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The Objective Eye: Color, Form, and Reality in the Theory of Art download epub

by John Hyman


Epub Book: 1813 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1421 kb.

But subjectivists mistakenly take this insight toimply that the objective world, as it is independentlyof our experience of it, does not contain any colors.

The Objective Eye: Color, Form, and Reality in the Theory of Art. University of Chicago Press, 2006, xiv + 286 p. 8 color + 97 b&w illus. But subjectivists mistakenly take this insight toimply that the objective world, as it is independentlyof our experience of it, does not contain any colors. This mistake is based on the false presupposition thatfor colors to be part of the objective world, they mustbe theoretical posits that are invoked to explain howour experience of them is produced. This presuppo-sition is falsified by Hymans fundamental principle,which limits the causal efficacy of colors and restrictsthem from functioning as theoretical posits.

The objective eye. color, form, and reality in the theory of art. by John Hyman. Published 2006 by University of Chicago Press in Chicago, IL. Written in English. N. The Physical Object. xix, 286 p. ; Number of pages.

Article in Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65(4):417-419 · September 2007 with 62 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

John Hyman’s The Objective Eye is a radical treatment of this problem, deeply .

John Hyman’s The Objective Eye is a radical treatment of this problem, deeply informed by the history of philosophy and science, but entirely fresh. The book progresses from pure philosophy to applied philosophy and ranges from the metaphysics of color to Renaissance perspective, from anatomy in ancient Greece to impressionism in nineteenth-century France. Philosophers, art historians, and students of the arts will find The Objective Eye challenging and absorbing.

scrupulously dissects the various myths and confusions surrounding the concept of depiction, with the aim of rehabilitating realism as 'one kind of excellence in ar. Against the misgivings of sophisticates, it champions what it sees as the natural, pre-theoretical stance. Against the misgivings of sophisticates, it champions what it sees as the natural, pre-theoretical stance of artists themselves. The concept of modality is Hyman's most important innovation. It opens up the fascinating prospect of a cross-cultural history of pictorial representation, freed from dependence upon the psychology of illusion. Historians of art - take note.

The longer you work, the more the mystery deepens of what appearance is, or how what is called appearance can be made in another medium. -Francis Bacon, painter This, in a nutshell, is the central problem in the theory of art. It has fascinated philosophers from Plato to Wittgenstein.

The Objective Eye book. John Hyman’s The Objective Eye is a radical treatment of this problem, deeply informed by the history of philosophy and science, but entirely fresh. The questions tackled here are fundamental ones: Is our experience of color an illusion? How does the metaphysical status of colors differ from that of shapes? What is the difference between a picture and a written text? Why are some pictures said to be more realistic than others?

The Objective Eye' explores the fundamental concepts we use constantly in our innocent thoughts and conversations about art, as well as in the most sophisticated art theory

The Objective Eye' explores the fundamental concepts we use constantly in our innocent thoughts and conversations about art, as well as in the most sophisticated art theory. The book progresses from pure philosophy to applied philosophy and ranges from the meta-physics of colour to Renaissance perspective. No current Talk conversations about this book.

John Hymans The Objective Eye is a radical treatment of this problem, deeply informed by the history of philosophy and science, but entirely fresh. The questions tackled here are fundamental ones: Is our experience of color an illusion? How does the metaphysical status of colors differ from that of shapes? What is the difference between a picture and a written text? Why are some pictures said to be more realistic than others? Is it because they are especially truthful or, on the contrary, because they deceive the eye?

The longer you work, the more the mystery deepens of what appearance is, or how what is called appearance can be made in another medium.

“The longer you work, the more the mystery deepens of what appearance is, or how what is called appearance can be made in another medium."—Francis Bacon, painter This, in a nutshell, is the central problem in the theory of art. It has fascinated philosophers from Plato to Wittgenstein. And it fascinates artists and art historians, who have always drawn extensively on philosophical ideas about language and representation, and on ideas about vision and the visible world that have deep philosophical roots. John Hyman’s The Objective Eye is a radical treatment of this problem, deeply informed by the history of philosophy and science, but entirely fresh. The questions tackled here are fundamental ones: Is our experience of color an illusion? How does the metaphysical status of colors differ from that of shapes? What is the difference between a picture and a written text?  Why are some pictures said to be more realistic than others? Is it because they are especially truthful or, on the contrary, because they deceive the eye? The Objective Eye explores the fundamental concepts we use constantly in our most innocent thoughts and conversations about art, as well as in the most sophisticated art theory.  The book progresses from pure philosophy to applied philosophy and ranges from the metaphysics of color to Renaissance perspective, from anatomy in ancient Greece to impressionism in nineteenth-century France. Philosophers, art historians, and students of the arts will find The Objective Eye challenging and absorbing. 

Comments: (2)

TheFresh
I looked forward to reading this book. I was encouraged by the reviews and by the table of contents. But after spending the past several days with it, I have to say that I have gotten very little out of it at all. Perhaps it is because I do not have a background in philosophy and have not got a lot of patience for it. My background is in lit theory and art history. If you are an artist, I do not think you will find much that is helpful in this book. It's not that I expected anything practical. I expected a theorizing of the problems of depiction in art, including color and form. Instead, I found what seems to me like a lot of quibbling over, for instance, whether something looks like or represents something else. Yes, there is a difference. Does it actually matter? Maybe to philosophers it does. But to artists? I do not think so.
Malodor
At last we have a thorough going critique of the subjectivist position. This book is equally suited to those approaching the subject from the philosophical viewpoint and those who are active workers in the fields of visual representation.
The Objective Eye: Color, Form, and Reality in the Theory of Art download epub
Graphic Design
Author: John Hyman
ISBN: 0226365522
Category: Arts & Photography
Subcategory: Graphic Design
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 2006)
Pages: 300 pages