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Van Gogh at Work download epub

by Marije Vellekoop


Epub Book: 1895 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1706 kb.

Marije Vellekoop is curator of prints and drawings at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. An amazing Van Gogh book. Includes excellent images of many of Van Gogh's works throughout his career (including paintings, drawings, watercolours, etc)

Marije Vellekoop is curator of prints and drawings at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Includes excellent images of many of Van Gogh's works throughout his career (including paintings, drawings, watercolours, etc). The accompanying text is also excellently written and complements the images well.

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In reality, Van Gogh learned extensively from others, exchanged ideas with his contemporaries, and often made use of prevailing methods and techniques to hone his skills. This extraordinary book explores the workmanship behind his artistry.

Vincent van Gogh () is often considered to be a genius in a class of his own, an exceptional self-taught artist who paid little attention to the art world around him. In reality, Van Gogh learned extensively from others, exchanged ideas with his contemporaries, and often made use of prevailing methods and techniques to hone his skills.

Vellekoop Marije Bakker Nienke. Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) is often considered to be a genius in a class of his own, an exceptional self-taught artist who paid little attention to the art world around him. This extraordinary book explores the workmanship behind his artistry

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Houses at Auvers is an oil painting by Vincent van Gogh, painted towards the end of May or beginning of June 1890, shortly after he had moved to Auvers-sur-Oise, a small town northwest of Paris, France.

Houses at Auvers is an oil painting by Vincent van Gogh, painted towards the end of May or beginning of June 1890, shortly after he had moved to Auvers-sur-Oise, a small town northwest of Paris, France.

Marije Vellekoop studied art history at Utrecht University and has worked at the Van Gogh Museum since 1995, holding .

Marije Vellekoop studied art history at Utrecht University and has worked at the Van Gogh Museum since 1995, holding the position of Curator of Prints and Drawings since 1999. An international symposium on Van Gogh’s working methods will be organised under her auspices and held in June of this year, and she is also responsible for the exhibition Van Gogh at work, which will open on 1 May 2013 at the Van Gogh Museum.

Art books, art products. The publisher Mercatorfonds and author/curator Marije Vellekoop have spared no effort at making this an excellent artbook on Van Gogh. Submitted by Teoh Yi Chie on March 31, 2014 - 10:51am. This is the companion artbook to the exhibition Van Gogh at Work at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, that was held on 1 May 2013 to 12 January 2014. It's a huge hardcover book with 304 pages. Paper and reproduction are fantastic. It's satisfying to look at all the paintings huge and marvel at the texture, colours and details.

Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890) is often considered to be a genius in a class of his own, an exceptional self-taught artist who paid little attention to the art world around him. In reality, Van Gogh learned extensively from others, exchanged ideas with his contemporaries, and often made use of prevailing methods and techniques to hone his skills.

This extraordinary book explores the workmanship behind his artistry. The reader follows Van Gogh’s quest to perfect his skills and the way he adopted various drawing and painting techniques; acquired information about materials; learned about the physical characteristics of canvasses, paint, paper, chalk, and other materials; how he approached working on paper and canvas and which factors influenced his working practice. Showing his work alongside that of other artists demonstrates the degree to which he followed examples set by his contemporaries. Van Gogh’s working methods are explored along with his most famous works, addressing topics as the use of a perspective frame, color theory, the influence of contemporaries and the famous repetitions of a theme as in the Sunflowers and the Bedroom series.


Comments: (7)

Ndyardin
This is the volume published to accompany the exhibition of the same name at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam from May 2013 until January 2014. It is edited and largely written by Marije Vellekoop, who is Head of Collection, Research and Exhibitions at the Museum and since 2008 the leader of an extensive multidisciplinary research project on Van Gogh's studio practice. It has contributions by several other curators and conservators, and it is a superb book. Over the course of many years' appreciation of his art I have accumulated some fifty or sixty books about him, ranging from small monographs on particular works to some blockbuster coffee-table editions and retrospectives and exhibition catalogues large and small in between, and this is one of the very best of them. (That number does not yet include the major result of Dr. Vellekoop's project, the simultaneously published volume "Van Gogh's Studio Practice," which is a larger, more comprehensive and apparently much more scientifically detailed account, to which this "At Work" volume is a more approachable companion.)

Van Gogh came late to painting (already twenty-seven), and he knew he had to make up for lost time. That probably explains the monomaniacal intensity with which he threw himself into acquiring the roots and fundamentals of his new study and which struck some people as fanatic, abrasive and irritating. It is the great merit of this book to concentrate on demonstrating how Vincent went about learning what it was he needed to know and to avoid the kind of biographical attention that his singular personality tends to invite. Thus the whole Christmas Eve blow-up with Gauguin, frequently so luridly described, is here soberly dismissed as a "row" that "threw [him] into a mental crisis and he wounded himself in the ear" (191). Instead, the emphasis is on how eager Van Gogh was to learn from the more experienced artist and how he studied the double portraits that Gauguin and Emile Bernard had sent to him for clues about the new painting. That is the focus throughout: interactions with other people are recorded only in so far as they affected his work, i.e., the artists with whom he painted and whose studios he visited, etc.; the only woman mentioned is Sien Hoornick, who appears only in her function as an unpaid model for him, and a nude one at that.

The book is divided into two parts. The first, a bit more than two-thirds of the whole, follows Vincent chronologically and geographically in fairly short segments that enable us to easily trace his path and his development. The first section, "Cuesmes, mid-August to mid-October 1880," records his decision to become an artist and his first steps in sketches, copies of prints and photographs, and his following the course of study in drawing manuals. The second, "Brussels, mid-October 1880," discusses his first studio course and experience of life drawing and his initial interaction with other art students. Then come "Etten, late April to late December 1881," with its charcoal drawings of the "Brabant types" and a brief excursion to The Hague, "The Hague, late December 1881 to mid-September 1883," with his study of watercolor with Anton Mauve, the nude drawing with Sien, his exploration of the perspective frame, etc., and so on until the end. All of these sections are extremely well illustrated with reproductions of Van Gogh's own work and that of other artists with whom he was working and studying, like Mauve himself and his fellow student Anton Van Rappard. There are descriptions and illustrations of aids like the perspective frame and the wooden drawing frame, of tools like pens and brushes, materials like paper and canvas, and of drawing materials in black and white and watercolors. There are discussions of color theory and his study of color charts, his fascination with Delacroix and experiments with color combinations, of oils and pigments and where he bought them, of kinds of supports and how he learned to treat them, etc., etc., just about every aspect of what he had to learn and do to make a painting. Much of the documentation is from his letters to Theo, and many of the letter sketches are also reproduced, especially when Vincent is describing a new technique or implement.

The second part of the book, about the last seventy-five pages, is topical, rather than chronological or geographical, and consists of short essays on specific subjects by contributing curators and conservators. These are very focussed pieces, also extensively illustrated, on matters such as "Painting thickly and thinly" (his experimentation in the summer of 1886 with pronounced brushwork, complementary colors, and thick impasto in the dozens of flower still lifes he painted in the style of Adolphe Monticelli; followed a few months later by experiments in painting thinly, almost as if drawing, in the manner adopted by his friend Toulouse-Lautrec). Other topics are the painterly relations of "Van Gogh, Bernard and Gauguin," "Reused canvases," "Van Gogh's new colors," "Van Gogh's cobalt blue analysed," etc. Indeed, color is one of the major priorities throughout this study, and much attention is paid to the artist's preoccupation with it. One particularly engaging strategy is the analysis of Van Gogh's self-portraits in the act of painting, where the author focusses on and discusses the paints on the painted palette, which by necessity are the same paints as were on the palette of the painter painting the portrait. By numbering the paints on the palette and treating them in turn, one can achieve a very coherent discussion of the paints in the portrait. The last section in the book is "Looking through the researchers' eyes," a brief discussion and explanation of the analytical tools available to the conservator and which were used in the evaluation of the paintings in the exhibition, things like X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and other advanced technologies. The volume concludes with some brief bibliographical references, an index of names and works, and a separate index of Van Gogh's works. This is a very serious treatment of those works as work, the hard work he had to do to get where he wanted to go. As I am not an artist, I can not judge the usefulness of the study to a working painter, although I can imagine that at the very least the many pages of blown-up pictures of the tubes and brushes and palettes and pencils that he used would be of interest to one. In any case, despite the variety and the excellence of the reproductions, this is not a book for someone who simply wants a nice representative selection of Van Gogh's oeuvre with some curatorial commentary. I myself found it greatly informative, as well as beautifully produced in all respects and, as I wrote, one of the very best of the huge Van Gogh literature.
Thordibandis
This is the complement to a current exhibition at the Van Gogh Museum. It is one of the most beautiful and intelligent art books I have ever read. I cannot praise it too highly. It is an absolute must for anyone who paints or draws and is interested in Van Gogh (that covers a lot of ground). It is not some piddling little survey with a few nice pictures and some vapid stuff about the arrival of oil paint in tubes -- this is the real thing: his easels, choice of paints, perspective frame, you name it, and all illustrated with amazing closeups, etc. There are beautiful, and I mean beautiful, photographs of Van Gogh's brushes, notebooks, charcoals, everything. As a painter myself, with, well, an obsession with materials, I confess that I have been wiping drool off the pages of this volume while reading along. Wow. Makes you want to get on a plane and head for Amsterdam.
dermeco
The Best Van Gogh book there is. This is the one I have been looking seeking for years. It shows how he did his amazing work. It's one thing to read about his activities, but to see how he worked is just awesome!
greed style
An amazing Van Gogh book. Includes excellent images of many of Van Gogh's works throughout his career (including paintings, drawings, watercolours, etc). The accompanying text is also excellently written and complements the images well. Highly recommended.
THOMAS
I love Van Gogh's work and this book does a great job explaining his paintings. Would recommend.
Goldcrusher
This is a remarkable book!!! The text is extensive but it is worth it, the images are beautiful.
Talvinl
This is a new book. It is everything it says it is in the title. It gives you a very good understanding of his work over time; how he learned to draw, the conditions he faced and how he taught himself to draw and paint in a style all of his own making. It has examples of the art materials he used; the brushes and paints; the plein-air materials; and many examples of his work. I've only read several chapters to this point and I am very impressed with this book.
The book is a marvelous display of Van Gogh's style and technique. You can really see the progress he made as an artists over his decade of work.
Van Gogh at Work download epub
Individual Artists
Author: Marije Vellekoop
ISBN: 0300191863
Category: Arts & Photography
Subcategory: Individual Artists
Language: English
Publisher: Mercatorfonds (August 20, 2013)
Pages: 304 pages