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There's A Riot Going On: Revolutionaries, Rock Stars, and the Rise and Fall of '60s Counter-Culture download epub

by Peter Doggett


Epub Book: 1310 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1915 kb.

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This book follows the counter-culture's various political movements from 1965 to 1972. Most of the information focuses on the happenings in the . though Peter Doggett does touch upon other countries and how the turmoil connected. Doggett covers the Weathermen, the Black Power groups, Yippies, the start of the Women's Movement, the political activists such as Abbie Hoffman, and the musicians who got involved. Doggett gives us insight into why the underground movements took off the way they did, as well as why many fizzled into nothing in the end.

There's A Riot Going On book.

Peter Doggett is one of the UK's leading rock writers and journalists. His most recent book is Are You Ready for the Country? (Viking), an authoritative history of country rock. He has also written biographies of John Lennon and Lou Reed. Country of Publication. The World, Ideas, Culture": General Interest.

He is a regular contributor to publications such as Mojo, Q, and GQ. Some of his books are The Art and Music of John Lennon, Are You Ready for the Country, and You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After The Break Up.

Manufacturer: Canongate Books Ltd Release date: 6 November 2008 ISBN-10 : 1847671144 ISBN-13: 9781847671141. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york. though Peter Doggett does touch upon other. Peter Doggett is one of the UK's leading rock writers and journalists. Библиографические данные.

In There's A Riot Going On, Peter Doggett documents the rollcall of rock musicians who wrote the anthems of. .

In There's A Riot Going On, Peter Doggett documents the rollcall of rock musicians who wrote the anthems of protest and revolt, those who spurned a union of song and politics, and those who were ambivalent or merely dabbled in the political turmoil.

Published by Canongate Books Ltd. 6 November 2008. Rock and soul music supplied the revolutionary tide with anthems and iconic imagery; and renowned musicians such as John Lennon, Mick Jagger and Bob Dylan were particularly influential in the movement.

Between 1965 and 1972, political activists around the globe prepared to mount a revolution, from the Black Panthers to the Gay Liberation Front, from the Yippies to the IRA. Rock and soul music supplied the revolutionary tide with anthems and iconic imagery; and renowned musicians such as John Lennon, Mick Jagger and Bob Dylan were particularly influential in the movement. This is the definitive account of this unique period in modern history; a compelling portrait of an era when revolutionaries turned into rock stars, and rock stars dressed up as revolutionaries.

Comments: (7)

Just_paw
As a reader who lived through all of the 50s, 60s and 70s as an increasingly mature adult (born 1934 and a rock fan), this book provided not only both a very detailed but comprehensive overview of the music, musicians and songwriters of the 60s in particular, it also provided a very detailed backdrop against which this very turbulent period unfolded. Highly recommended.
Goldcrusher
One of the best books I've read in months. A sweeping inclusive view of history of the "revolution" from the mid sixties through the end of the Symbionese Liberation Army. If you lived through these times, this book will help put it all into perspective.
Marirne
This book does a very good job of blending the counterculture movement of the 60s and early 70s with the music scene of the time. More importantly, it personalizes the iconic music figures, such as Bob Dylan and John Lennon, as the antitheses and embodiment of the often-confused, inconsistent bandwagoners of the proto-revolutionary fervor that stemmed from the Vietnam war, the Cold war and the civil right struggles. Dylan, despite his lyrics, refused to be used as symbol of the leftists, all the while toying with Zionism, whereas Lennon experimented with drugs, eastern religious figures and Yoko Ono in order to configure himself as some kind of spokesman for disillusioned and idealistic youth. The Black Panthers play a role in this process also, though the book tends to minimize the influence of music in the movement and focuses on their internal, fratricidal struggles. The counterculture celebrities, like Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, even got caught up in the rock star imagery, with the predictable result that their dedication to the "Revolution" became less and less a focal point in their lives. The book ends with the terminal event of the Proto-Revolution That Wasn't with George McGovern's devastatingly brutal defeat in the 1972 presidential election versus Nixon, the personification of conservative, reactionary American evil. It is a long book, but well paced and full of the quirky rock star-counterculture anecdote, such as Dylan's struggle with the Dylan Liberation Front, that spent a good deal of time going through his garbage. I recommend this to rock music historians and anyone interested in the countercultural movement.
Goldfury
This book follows the counter-culture's various political movements from 1965 to 1972. Most of the information focuses on the happenings in the U.S., though Peter Doggett does touch upon other countries and how the turmoil connected. Doggett covers the Weathermen, the Black Power groups, Yippies, the start of the Women's Movement, the political activists such as Abbie Hoffman, and the musicians who got involved.

Doggett gives us insight into why the underground movements took off the way they did, as well as why many fizzled into nothing in the end. While the book is divided by year, at times Doggett jumps around in his attempt to cover a person or movement's activities. For the most part, I didn't have a problem with the format. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the period of history that sparked an incredible amount of change in our lives.
Hystana
Peter Doggett did a ton of research for this book. He uncovered stories and facts and information from everywhere. If anything there is too much in this book, and some judicious editing would have improved it. But that's just a quibble. This book is a rich vein of lore that you can follow for days and still find something new. Does he prove his thesis, whatever it is? Frankly, dear reader, I don't give a damn--it's the stories that keep me reading. Enjoy.
Quynaus
In taking a line from The Beach Boys' `Student Demonstration Time'- to name but one reference - as its title, author Doggett makes it clear his massive tome is directed at describing the relationship between what I will call popular music and the multi-headed beast of socio-economic-political action. It's not a new topic, nor is it a topic not already in the consciousness of many - if not most folks. Music has always been a medium discourse - both pro and con. It is also part of the fabric of our lives as a means to expression, both individually and in groups. The issue of what music means - both as a manifestation of our culture and as a tool of change - has also been addressed before; some of Ian Whitcomb's books come to mind immediately.

What Doggett has done is take the period from roughly 1950 to 1975 and provide a narrative history of how music and - more importantly - the musicians were involved in the politics of change taking place. So, it is really much more a story of the music industry and its participants than a history of change.

What we find is not surprising in that those involved, more often than not, had their own agenda. In fact, often these self-interests were at odds or even totally opposed to the events. Bob Dylan never became the anti-war/antiestablishment leader that his iconic stature implied. John Lennon may have sang "Women are the [......] of the world," but his actions indicated that his heart (maybe [....] is a better choice of words) lay in maintaining and enjoying a feminine-servile condition. In fact, Doggett repeatedly complains - to the point of carping - that misogynistic attitudes permeated the music scene and its spillover into politics.

None of this should have been surprising to Doggett or anyone else, for that matter, as books, films, plays, songs, newspaper and reality television have all addressed this issue. Yes, there are exceptions; there always are. But, this period in rock 'n' roll - a period before Heart, Hole, The Runaways, Fanny, The Slits and Madonna - was a male playland.

To make the failure of our music idols to embrace the "revolution" the centerpiece of a book this sprawling is an exercise in the self-obvious. There are better ways to learn about the history of this period. What happenhs here is that the author castigates failure to live up to the dogma and doctrines of revolution. How could you excpect otherwise from a medium like popular music where excess is applauded?
There's A Riot Going On: Revolutionaries, Rock Stars, and the Rise and Fall of '60s Counter-Culture download epub
Music
Author: Peter Doggett
ISBN: 1847671144
Category: Arts & Photography
Subcategory: Music
Language: English
Publisher: Canongate Books; Main edition (November 6, 2008)
Pages: 608 pages