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The Book of Salsa: A Chronicle of Urban Music from the Caribbean to New York City (Latin America in Translation/en Traducción/em Tradução) download epub

by César Miguel Rondón


Epub Book: 1179 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1889 kb.

Venezuelan TV producer Rondón documented salsa music from the 1950s to the 1970s in this survey, first .

Crossing continents, from New York City and Puerto Rico to Venezuela, Rondón examines salsa's working-class origins, conceived, nurtured and developed in the urban barrio as a type of music produced not for the luxurious ballroom but for hard life on the street, and he relates the difficulties of marginalized barrio life to the music's international appeal.

Venezuelan TV producer Rondón documented salsa music from the 1950s to the 1970s in this survey, first published in. .wonderful chronicle of the Latin urban music that ruled from the Caribbean to New York City from the mid-sixties to the late-seventies.

wonderful chronicle of the Latin urban music that ruled from the Caribbean to New York City from the mid-sixties to the late-seventies. This book is one of the best single comprehensive chronicles of this music and its industry, the musicians and their performances, styles, movements and productions.

The Book of Salsa book. This lively translation provides for English-reading and music-loving fans the chance to enjoy Cesar Miguel Rondon's celebrated El libro de la salsa

The Book of Salsa book. This lively translation provides for English-reading and music-loving fans the chance to enjoy Cesar Miguel Rondon's celebrated El libro de la salsa. Rondon tells the engaging story of salsa's roots in Puerto Rico, Cuba, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, and Venezuela, and of its emergence and development in the 1960s as a distinct musical movement in New York.

Salsa is one of the most popular types of music listened to and danced to in the United States

Salsa is one of the most popular types of music listened to and danced to in the United States.

eISBN: 978-1-4696-0380-3. Subjects: Music, History.

Salsa is one of the most popular types of music listened to and danced to in the United States. eISBN: 978-1-4696-0380-3.

The Book of Salsa: A Chronicle of Urban Music from the Caribbean to New York City. Rondon presents salsa as a truly pan-Caribbean phenomenon, emerging in the migrations and interactions, the celebrations and conflicts that marked the region

The Book of Salsa: A Chronicle of Urban Music from the Caribbean to New York City. by César Miguel Rondón. Rondon presents salsa as a truly pan-Caribbean phenomenon, emerging in the migrations and interactions, the celebrations and conflicts that marked the region. Although salsa is rooted in urban culture, Rondon explains, it is also a commercial product produced and shaped by professional musicians, record producers, and the music industry. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Crossing continents, from New York City and Puerto Rico to Venezuela, Rondon examines salsa's .

Crossing continents, from New York City and Puerto Rico to Venezuela, Rondon examines salsa's working-class origins. and relates the difficulties of marginalized barrio life to the music's international appeal. Along with insightful analyses of styles, music, movements, performances, production and marketing, offers detailed coverage of such highly influential talents as Willie Colon, Eddie Palmieri and Ray Barretto. The concluding 'Basic Discography' serves as a great collecting guide.

Rondón presents salsa as a truly pan-Caribbean phenomenon, emerging in the migrations and interactions, the celebrations and conflicts that marked the region. Although salsa is rooted in urban culture, Rondón explains, it is also a commercial product produced and shaped by professional musicians, record producers, and the music industry. from publisher description.

This chapter examines the popularity of salsa in New York City. Before discussing salsa's invasion of the Caribbean, it gives consideration to trends in Latin American popular music from the tango of the 1930s to the rock and romantic pop ballads of the 1970s, followed by disco music, and so on. Attention then turns to the distinction between the trends created by the industry and the more. intrinsic values and meanings that salsa holds

Salsa is one of the most popular types of music listened to and danced to in the United States. Until now, the single comprehensive history of the music--and the industry that grew up around it, including musicians, performances, styles, movements, and production--was available only in Spanish. This lively translation provides for English-reading and music-loving fans the chance to enjoy Cesar Miguel Rondon's celebrated El libro de la salsa.Rondon tells the engaging story of salsa's roots in Puerto Rico, Cuba, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, and Venezuela, and of its emergence and development in the 1960s as a distinct musical movement in New York. Rondon presents salsa as a truly pan-Caribbean phenomenon, emerging in the migrations and interactions, the celebrations and conflicts that marked the region. Although salsa is rooted in urban culture, Rondon explains, it is also a commercial product produced and shaped by professional musicians, record producers, and the music industry. For this first English-language edition, Rondon has added a new chapter to bring the story of salsa up to the present.

Comments: (7)

Pedora
Very accurate and well written, although the Spanish version remains superior.
Barit
Good buy and prompt delivery. Thank you!
Onetarieva
I would ordinarily not review a book I didn't finish, but Rondón made two errors in the first 28 pages so grievous that I put the book down for good. First, about the debut album from Eddie Palmieri's band La Perfecta, he claims: "Eddie's older brother, Charlie, was the pianist and in charge of composing and arranging most of their repertoire." If he owned this album--one of the most important in the history of salsa--he could plainly see that Charlie wrote the liner notes and did nothing else on it.

Then, a few pages later, he attributes the song "Micaela" to Pete "El Conde" Rodriguez. Now this is an error so common that Fania records itself has made it on at least one of their compilations, but Rondón should know better. There were two different artists named Pete Rodriguez on the Fania label--Pete "El Conde" Rodriguez, the salsa singer who did "Catalina La O," among other classics, and Pete Rodriguez (and his Orchestra), who was dubbed "The King of Boogaloo." It was the latter who did "Micaela."

It's bad enough that Rondón, a Venezuelan, tries desperately to maintain that Venezuela was as important to the history of Salsa as Puerto Rico, but these huge factual errors (as well as minor ones--the original Perfecta included a flautist and was heavily influenced by charanga, though Rondón seems not to know this) indicate a stunning lack of knowledge about his subject and a failure to get anyone to fact check his work.
Naktilar
This is by far the best Android YouTube app, much better than YouTube's own app.

For one, you can download almost all of the videos, even ones where the unloader doesn't want you to be able to watch. (Read below) And you can download on many

There are a few annoyances however, snd that's why it deserves the 4 star rating. It doesn't multitask video playing, although I suspect that's Google's fault. Android "multitasking" is a lie. The organization of the videos is not very well developed.

But it's fairly reliable.

Hint: Use this in conjunction with the Soul Player app, the best video playing app I've found so far.

When you come across a video that YouTube says you can't watch on mobile devices, either touch the green down arrow or the maximize button on the video screen. They both do the same thing: bring up the download screen. From there you can download and sometimes play the video anyway. In fact, sometimes the green arrow doesn't show up. Press the maximize window button. You can download from there.
Ral
Why confuse myself by reading this book. . .;
Saying that Johnny Pacheco sounded like the Sonora Mantancera and had same instrumentation on the first 2 recordings with Celia Cruz was absurd and enough to make me skeptical of all the contents of the book, that is, not knowing what to trust. No solid ground here. Instead of bongo the Sonora had palitos or timbalitos, sort of miniature timbales played with sticks. Also, Pacheco had 2 congas, when the Sonora always had one and he played a sparser pattern than that typically used for salsa. Additionally, the bongos with Pacheco riff or speak a lot, weaving in and out of the rhythm. The paila player with Sonora played straight much more of the time. The texture of the bands was very distinct and also what some might call the feeling which includes the rhythmic feel. All salsa is relatively square or quadrato whereas Cuban son is sinuous. The rhythm is more subtle, less in your face, especially in septeto or sexteto style.
Yet more . . . author says the guitar with the Sonora Mantancera was not audibile in person or on recordings. Wrong, of course. On Melao de Cana the guitar is prominent, complimenting perfectly the guajira nature of the song. And more, the trumpets with Sonora did not play improvised solos as is done in son and salsa, yet of course they did on Pacheco records.
I am plagued, finally, by wondering whether this author in fact LISTENED to music.
Mettiarrb
I read this book in it's original Spanish version, so I can't comment on the translated English version now available. The Spanish version was an entertaining read with a "Sociological Perspective" about the rise of Salsa in the 60's and 70's mostly focused on the artists on the Fania label - which is considered the "Golden Age" of Salsa Music. If you're a fan of that era, it's definitely worth a read. It'll bring back lots of memories. I only gave it 4 stars because the author, as has been pointed out by other reviewers, was a little loose with the facts and sometimes gets some of the details wrong. Although overall he gets the gist and spirit of the music and the times right. The other thing is that the author refers to Venezuela quite a bit, his home country, when this story is really more about Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico and New York who were the real stars of this music (besides Celia Cruz of course). But, cut the dude some slack, he's proud of his home country like everyone in the Caribbean is... (Que viva Colombia !Carajo!) Highly Recommended to fans of Old School Salsa.
The Book of Salsa: A Chronicle of Urban Music from the Caribbean to New York City (Latin America in Translation/en Traducción/em Tradução) download epub
Music
Author: César Miguel Rondón
ISBN: 0807831298
Category: Arts & Photography
Subcategory: Music
Language: English
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (March 10, 2008)
Pages: 352 pages