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The Jazz Ear: Conversations over Music download epub

by Ben Ratliff


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In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them.

In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them. In the process, he skillfully coaxes out a profound understanding of the men and women themselves, the context of their work, and how jazz-from horn blare to drum riff-is created conceptually.

Ratliff's book stands ou. .In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them

Ratliff's book stands ou.admirably provides an unpretentious and reader-friendly window into jazz esthetics. -The Ottawa Citizen. In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them.

Ratliff, Ben. Publication date. New York : Times Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ymusic; americana; audio music. The Archive of Contemporary Music. Wayne Shorter - Street music : Pat Metheny - Jazz means freedom : Sonny Rollins - As good as you think : Andrew Hill - I know who you are : Ornette Coleman - The flying modulation : Maria Schneider - You've got to finish your thought : Bob Brookmeyer - It's your spirit : Dianne Reeves - Head of.

Автор: Ratliff Ben Название: The Jazz Ear: Conversations Over Music . This book offers a narrative of Coltrane& life and also discusses this saxophonist& unique sound

This book offers a narrative of Coltrane& life and also discusses this saxophonist& unique sound.

In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them

In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them. In the process, he skillfully coaxes out a profound understanding of the men and women themselves, the context of their work, and how jazz-from horn blare to drum riff-is created conceptually

Электронная книга "The Jazz Ear: Conversations over Music", Ben Ratliff.

Электронная книга "The Jazz Ear: Conversations over Music", Ben Ratliff. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Jazz Ear: Conversations over Music" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In The Jazz Ear, acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff discusses with jazz .

In The Jazz Ear, acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff discusses with jazz greats the recordings that most influenced them and skillfully coaxes out a profound understanding of the men and women themselves, the context of their work, and how jazz-from horn blare to drum riff-is conceptualized. The Jazz Ear will be a permanent part of learning how to listen inside the musicians playing. -Nat Hentoff, Jazz Times

Jazz is conducted almost wordlessly: John Coltrane rarely told his quartet what to do, and Miles Davis famously gave his group only the barest instructions before recording his masterpiece "Kind of Blue".

Jazz is conducted almost wordlessly: John Coltrane rarely told his quartet what to do, and Miles Davis famously gave his group only the barest instructions before recording his masterpiece "Kind of Blue". Musicians are often loath to discuss their craft for fear of destroying its improvisational essence, rendering jazz among the most ephemeral and least transparent of the performing arts. In "The Jazz Ear", the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them.

The Jazz Ear: Conversations Over Music. Times Books, New York, 2008. Coltrane: The Story of a Sound. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2007. The New York Times Essential Library: Jazz. Times Books, New York, 2002. "National Book Critics Circle: NBCC Award Finalists in Criticism: Ben Ratliff's "Coltrane" - Critical Mass Blog". "Ben Ratliff - NYU Journalism". JJA Jazz Awards 2018. May 4, 2018 – via NYTimes.

An intimate exploration into the musical genius of fifteen living jazz legends, from the longtime New York Times jazz critic

Jazz is conducted almost wordlessly: John Coltrane rarely told his quartet what to do, and Miles Davis famously gave his group only the barest instructions before recording his masterpiece “Kind of Blue.” Musicians are often loath to discuss their craft for fear of destroying its improvisational essence, rendering jazz among the most ephemeral and least transparent of the performing arts.

In The Jazz Ear, the acclaimed music critic Ben Ratliff sits down with jazz greats to discuss recordings by the musicians who most influenced them. In the process, he skillfully coaxes out a profound understanding of the men and women themselves, the context of their work, and how jazz—from horn blare to drum riff—is created conceptually. Expanding on his popular interviews for The New York Times, Ratliff speaks with Sonny Rollins, Ornette Coleman, Branford Marsalis, Dianne Reeves, Wayne Shorter, Joshua Redman, and others about the subtle variations in generation, training, and attitude that define their music.

Playful and keenly insightful, The Jazz Ear is a revelatory exploration of a unique way of making and hearing music.


Comments: (7)

Mamuro
Very much enjoyed this book. As a novice to jazz history I especially enjoyed the format of this book in which Ratliff interviews well known jazz artists (those in late career or retirement as well as some in their early careers). InterestinglyRatliff does not directly ask those he interviewed about their own music and careers...rather he asks about the artists who have most influenced those interviewed. Using this strategy, Ratliff covers a broad range of jazz history. I learned a lot..very interesting.
Whitehammer
I got this as a gift for my father who loves jazz, he liked it a lot, it brought to life many of the big names he has known and listened to. It is good for basic to advanced fans of jazz, he probably fall somewhere in between and felt the content was not too technical.
Blacknight
As with any rewarding relationship, listening is central to creating a genuine friendship with jazz. Ben Ratliff's conversations with some of the living masters of the music suggest paths you may take. Ultimately, it is the music that matters most, and each of us will find our own way to it. This book offers insights that will enrich even a longtime jazz aficionado's appreciation and enjoyment of this uniquely dynamic music, which can never really be explained in words. But this is no less a fascinating book. It's a gem, one I suspect will interest and inform readers for a long time.
Gadar
i got this for someone as a Christmas gift and they started reading it that night. It seems really interesting and they really liked it.
Wyameluna
I received the book in a timely manner. It arrived in excellent condition. It is well written, and very informative. My experiences in ordering materials from Amazon have been excellent.
anneli
Since I'm going to voice concerns about jazz writing in general, let me start by saying that I like this book a lot. I read it in one sitting and I underlined numerous passages to copy. Having said that....

Jazz is my favorite and longest held music, but unlike classical music, it suffers from a dearth of serious, sustained popular critical writing. There are exceptions to this statement, most notably Gunther Schuller's studies of early swing and Ellington. Some jazz musicians, principally composers and arrangers, have written at length on how to construct a jazz piece and do a solo. But most books on jazz today for a lay audience are either biographical or reminiscent in nature (John Szwed on Sun Ra and Miles, Andy Hamilton on Lee Konitz, Laurence Bergreen on Louis Armstrong, Bill Crow's hilarious and fascinating anecdotes about the jazz life) or journals and reviews (Whitney Balliett's Collected Works: A Journal of Jazz 1951-2000, Gene Lees's and Balliett's essays on various pop and jazz singers, countless collections of interviews). Even Gary Giddins's Visions of Jazz: The First Century, a book I like a great deal, is basically a collection of occasional essays, relieved by a few record reviews (e.g., of Hank Jones and Charlie Haden's Steal Away).

Ben Ratliff has been jazz critic at the New York Times since 1996. He knows the jazz scene, he knows his music and he writes sympathetically and perceptively about this elusive American music. This is a good book. I read it in one sitting. I had read it all it four hours after I picked it up and I enjoyed it thoroughly. Nonetheless, I was frustrated that it didn't do more than it does.

The hook in this highly readable collection of essays is that Ratliff asked a number of prominent jazz musicians to pick recordings, a maximum of six, to listen to and talk about with him. They didn't have to be jazz recordings. Several weren't: Wayne Shorter wanted to listen to Vaughan Williams, Pat Metheny to Bach and Ornette Coleman to a Jewish cantor recorded in 1916; Maria Schneider chose Martha Argerich's recording of the Ravel piano concerto in G major and Branford Marsalis selected Stravinsky and Wagner). One rule applied: they couldn't select a recording on which they themselves played. One musician, Ornette Coleman, refused to comply with that rule but then, Coleman has seldom followed other people's rules. Ratliff's idea was that in talking about others' music, his artists would reveal much about their own musical history, preferences and ideas. He was right. They did. The result is a set of fascinating interviews with some of the most important and representative artists in jazz today. In addition to the artists mentioned above, they include such luminaries as Bob Brookmeyer, Hank Jones, Dianne Reeves, Branford Marsalis Joshua Redman, Roy Haynes, Paul Motian, and Andrew Hill.

It's not a fault of this book to say that I wish he had included some other musicians. I would love to have heard from more musicians who live on the fringes of success -Roscoe Mitchell or Muhal Richard Abrams, for instance, from the AACM; soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom, who seems to owe allegiance to no one except herself and has been woefully neglected b y listeners; David Murray, my personal favorite among modernists; Billy Bang; William Parker. And I hope someday someone writes about the European modernists, from Peter Brotzman and Evan Parker and Hann Bennink and Derek Bailey to Enrico Rava, Tomasz Stanko, Gianluigi Trovesi and Stefano Bollano.

Jazz is a spacious house. It's not to Ratliff's discredit that he hasn't spread his net wider, but I hope he keeps writing this series. And I hope that someday he combines his insights into this fragile, evanescent, glorious music and produces a capacious study of the music's sources, strengths and techniques.
Anicasalar
Normally when we think about musicians and "their music", we think about the music that they write, perform, and record. But author Ben Ratliff (jazz critic for the New York Times) decided to ask a different question. What do these musicians listen to and find influential? What are they thinking and hearing as they listen to the music? So Ratliff met with a dozen or so noted jazz musicians, asked them what tracks they'd like to listen to, and then relates to us the experience and conversations of listening to the music with the musicians. The result is The Jazz Ear: Conversations Over Music. It turns out to be fascinating stuff.

Though I am a musician and fancy myself a fan (though not a hardcore aficionado) of jazz, it quickly became clear to me that the plane these guys think on is just incredibly high. It is fascinating in its own way, though, listening to serious jazz players talk about how they think about jazz. My favorite part of the book, though, was the reference list at the back, where Ratliff lists each recording that he listened to with each of the musicians. It has been a great input for my personal playlist... so much to explore.

If you're a musician, like jazz, or just want to explore the minds of some great musicians, I'd recommend picking up The Jazz Ear. It's a short read, but quite worth it.
What a novel concept to take the world's best living jazz artists and ask them to bring five or six pieces with them to discuss. Then have a conversation about music and what is important to them in the pieces they have chosen. This will appeal to all music lovers, not just jazz afficionados, as the first conversation with Wayne Shorter describing why he likes Ralph Vaughan Williams's symphonies can attest. A great selection of living jazz legends - Shorter, Metheny, Rollins, Coleman, Redman, Marsalis, et al. Highly recommended.
The Jazz Ear: Conversations over Music download epub
Music
Author: Ben Ratliff
ISBN: 0805081461
Category: Arts & Photography
Subcategory: Music
Language: English
Publisher: Times Books; First Edition edition (November 11, 2008)
Pages: 256 pages