» » Creating Unforgettable Characters: A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories

Creating Unforgettable Characters: A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories download epub

by Linda Seger


Epub Book: 1681 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1991 kb.

Creating Unforgettable Characters.

Creating Unforgettable Characters. For this book, I've interviewed over thirty writers who have articulated and affirmed these concepts; these include novelists and writers for film.

Chapter 5: Creating Character Relationships. Chapter 6: Adding Supporting and Minor Characters

Creating Unforgettable Characters book. a good reminder of how vital it is to get down within a character that I am creating, to ensure that they carry their weight throughout the story.

Creating Unforgettable Characters book. including you and I. She makes many references to various sectors of character-driven media (. movies, television shows, et., which can all be applied to creating characters within any type of narrative.

Электронная книга "Creating Unforgettable Characters: A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories", Linda Seger

Электронная книга "Creating Unforgettable Characters: A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories", Linda Seger. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Creating Unforgettable Characters: A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Interviews with today's top writers complete this essential volume.

Short Title CREATING UNFORGETTABLE CHARACT. Linda Seger runs a leading film script consultancy, and is author of ten books. She is an international authority on screenwriting. Read full description. Creating Unforgettable Characters: Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels and Short Stories by Linda Seger (Paperback, 1990). Brand new: lowest price.

Creating Unforgettable Characters: Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels and Short Stories. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Interviews with today's top writers complete this essential volume. Linda Seger is the author of Making a Good Script Great. She is married and lives in Venice, California. Country of Publication. Usage & Writing Guides. Henry Holt & Company Inc. A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories. Connect with the author.

In this book, Linda Seger shows how to create strong, multidimensional characters in fiction, covering everything from research to character block. Interviews with today's top writers complete this essential volume.


Comments: (7)

Mataxe
Good advice, and while I don't subscribe to researching your character for 7 years as in "Witness" , but, again, people write in different speed. I would say, when a character "speaks" to you and by that I mean when you know exactly what they say and how they say it, and what would they do, which is exactly their nature, because you know them well - then it's the time you know them enough; be it just months or years.
Umge
This is one of the most detailed books on character psychology and development for storytelling that I've encountered. Most books out there seem to focus on plot. The holy trinity is premise, plot and characters. This book is a must have for anyone that takes writing seriously. It justly references another must have, "The Art of Dramatic Writing", by Lajos Egri. It's the one book that I would say really adds to Egri's work.
Shakar
Sad to say,I agree with "Thin" and "Forgetable". Probably worth the $1.06 used price... maybe. Such a difference from Seger's earlier book, "Making a Good Script Great", which I liked very much.

It seems like such a rehash of the obvious, after which we get painfully detailed exposition about what, for example, "Conflict is an essential element of almost all fiction writing" means (p.92). Do we need examples of conflict dialogue ? Maybe??

I am not a novice screenwriter, so maybe I'm being too critical, but I have not learned one thing from this book. Sorry Linda.
GWEZJ
In the preface, Linda Seger observes: "The concepts within this book relate to the creation of all fiction characters and are based on the principles I've discovered as a drama professor, a theater director, and script consultant.... For this book, I've interviewed over thirty writers who have articulated and affirmed these concepts; these include novelists and writers for film."

Her how-to book comprises ten engaging chapters, each concluding with a case study on a well-known screenscript such as "Ordinary People," "Gorillas in the Mist," and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." The chapters also provide a detailed application checklist to guide the reader during the character-creation process.

Some of the highlights of the ten chapters are as follows.

Chapter 1: Researching the Character. "Research can take longer than any other part of scriptwriting." Seger quotes William Kelley, writer of WITNESS: "I researched the Amish for seven years, and Earl and I wrote the script during the 1980 writers' strike, which lasted about three months" (p 17).

Chapter 2: Defining the Character: Consistencies and Paradoxes. "Shaping the clay of your character is a six-step process." One of these steps is "adding quirks, the illogical, the paradoxical" (p 46).

Chapter 3: Creating the Backstory. "Finding the backstory is a process of discovery. The writer needs to work back and forth constantly -- asking questions about the past to understand the present" (p 62).

Chapter 4: Understanding Character Psychology. Seger quotes Barry Morrow, writer of RAIN MAN, "Half of writing is psychology. There's a consistent core, or a consistent unity to behavior.... Every action has motivation and intention" (p 63). This chapter includes an insightful section on "how inner backstory defines character," citing Freud and Jung's theories. Also a section on "how abnormal behavior defines character," citing Woody Allen's HANNAH AND HER SISTERS among others.

Chapter 5: Creating Character Relationships. Seger notes that "some of the most successful films and television series have featured two stars, not one" (p 91), citing examples of THE AFRICAN QUEEN, ADAM'S RIB, LETHAL WEAPON among others.

Chapter 6: Adding Supporting and Minor Characters. Seger notes that "many of the best stories are memorable because of their supporting characters" and quotes James Dearden, writer of FATAL ATTRACTION: "Within the context of reality, you can make your little characters interesting...keeping people's eyes moving and their ears flapping and their brains working. It's those little details that make something come alive" (p 145).

Chapter 7: Writing Dialogue. "Great dialogue has conflict, emotions, and attitudes. It also has another essential component: the subtext. Subtext is what the character is saying beneath and between the lines. One of the most delightful examples of subtext comes from the film "Annie Hall," written by Woody Allen. When Alvie and Annie first meet, they look each other over. Their dialogue is an intellectual discussion about photography, but their subtexts are written in subtitles on the screen." Subtextually, "she wonders if she's smart enough for him, he wonders if he's shallow; she wonders if he's a shmuck like other men she's dated, he wonders what she looks like naked. Both understand the subtext of their conversation" (p 148). I found this chapter the most instructive of all.

Chapter 8: Creating Nonrealistic Characters. Examples cited include "E. T.,' "King Kong," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," "Superman," and "The Phantom of the Opera."

Chapter 9: Beyond Stereotyping. Example of stereotyping: "Blacks are often portrayed as comical or as perpetrators of crimes" (p 197). "A character type is not the same as a stereotype. The doddering father or the braggadocio soldier are character types, not stereotypes, because the portrayal is balanced with other images of fathers and soldiers" (p 198).

Chapter 10: Solving Character Problems. "Writing good characters is a complicated process. Getting stuck happens to even the best of writers. Turning to some of these problem-solving techniques can lead to breakthroughs that can help make your characters work." Yes, indeed.

This outstanding book merits high priority on the aspiring screenwriter's craft-study list.

-- C J Singh
Vudogal
I don’t know where to begin, but if you are ever interested in writing, this book is awesome! Seger really explains how to make these characters believable. I just read this book, and read another online book with her teachings in mind. With this, I could see exactly where the author got it right. I would highly recommend this if you want to start learning to write.
-Abe’s Cakes
Sharpbrew
I found this book delightful, practical and extremely useful. Not only was it very readable, but it will be a resource I'm sure I will turn to again and again whenever I'm stuck with a character that just won't move. I'm delighted to have found this book, and I recommend it to anyone who is looking for something to have on the shelf for those days when your story seems to have stopped dead in its tracks. Linda Seger will get you going again, and you'll have fun at the same time!
Fordrelis
Fixing the new HBO series, Luck. By the end of the first episode my wife was complaining that the characters were not engaging, particularly in comparison with Boardwalk Empire. One of the reviews says "starts off slow and picks up." When? The people who wrote Luck should have done more prep on the characters, and their bosses should have paid more attention. We can see that they learned the lingo of the track. So what? With the possible exception of the Nick Nolte character and the Latino trainer, the people in this series are little more than stick figures. The Irish jockette has possibilities. If you want to write for film or TV, buy this book and do the work.
Creating Unforgettable Characters: A Practical Guide to Character Development in Films, TV Series, Advertisements, Novels & Short Stories download epub
Performing Arts
Author: Linda Seger
ISBN: 0805011714
Category: Arts & Photography
Subcategory: Performing Arts
Language: English
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks; 1st edition (July 15, 1990)
Pages: 256 pages