» » Memoirs of a Bastard Angel

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel download epub

by James Baldwin,Harold Norse


Epub Book: 1171 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1422 kb.

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel traces Norse's life and literary career with Auden, Christopher Isherwood, E. E. Cummings, Tennessee Williams, William Carlos Williams, James Baldwin, Dylan Thomas, William Burroughs, Allen.

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel traces Norse's life and literary career with Auden, Christopher Isherwood, E. Cummings, Tennessee Williams, William Carlos Williams, James Baldwin, Dylan Thomas, William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Paul Bowles, Charles Bukowski, Robert Graves and Anaïs Nin. With Carnivorous Saint: Gay Poems 1941-1976 Norse became a leading gay liberation poet. New Directions 13, ed. James Laughlin, 1951. Mentor, New American Library, 1958. City Lights Journal, ed.

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel Hardcover – November 1, 1989. Norse, author of Beat Hotel (1983) and over a dozen book of poetry, has written a gossipy, bawdy memoir recounting an adventurous life on three continents. by. Harold Norse (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Although he describes himself as an outsider, Norse was friendly with some of the most important writers of his time, and his book includes anecdotes on a host of literary lions, among them . Auden, James Baldwin, William Carlos Williams, Tennessee Williams, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs.

Norse was acquaintanced with writers ranging from . Harold Norse, although unknown by many, was at the center of American poetry. Auden, James Baldwin, Tennessee Williams, William Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg to Charles Bukowski and Ezra Pound. He recalls them all in this 1989 memoir. He met Ginsberg on a subway in the 1940's, he lived in the Beat Hotel in Paris and did cutups, he was a secretary for WH Auden and had a long correspondence with both William Carlos Willians and Charles Bukowski. He chose the American idiom of Williams over the English formalism of Auden.

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel book. In Greenwich Village Norse became an intimate of James Baldwin (then working on his first novel) and in Provincetown lived with Tennessee William Harold Norse has spent half a century simultaneously at the center and in the vanguard of literary and homosexual subcultures. His career began in 1939, when W. H. Auden seduced and married Norse's college lover, Chester Kallman.

MEMOIRS OF A BASTARD ANGEL by Harold Norse. Preface by James Baldwin). Yellow printed wrappers, 536 pages. Auden while still a student. Reader of James Baldwin's first novel before it found a publisher. Close friend of William Burroughs when the two were living in the famous 'Beat Hotel' in Paris. Harold Norse's candid autobiography is, in its own right, a classic in the genre.

In Greenwich Village Norse became an intimate of James Baldwin (then working on his first novel) and in Provincetown lived with Tennessee Williams, who was completing The Glass Menagerie. In 1952, William Carlos Williams presented Norse at his reading debut calling Norse "the best poet of your generation. Other admirers included Anais Nin, Dylan Thomas, Christopher Isherwood, and . In the 1960s in Paris, Norse codeveloped the innovative Cut-up method while living in the Beat Hotel with William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Gregory Corso.

The Estate of James Baldwin would like to extend appreciation to Erroll McDonald, Randall Kenan . A Quarter-Century of Un-Americana. Memoirs of a Bastard Angel: A Fifty-Year Literary and Erotic Odyssey by Harold Norse.

The Estate of James Baldwin would like to extend appreciation to Erroll McDonald, Randall Kenan, Lily Evans, Eileen Ahearn, Douglas Field, Rene Boatman, and Quentin Miller for bringing this collection to fruition. Daddy Was a Number Runner by Louise Meriwether.

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel traces Norse's life and literary career with Auden, Christopher Isherwood, . Cummings, Tennessee Williams, William Carlos Williams, James Baldwin, Dylan Thomas, William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Paul Bowles, Charles Bukowski, Robert Graves and Anaïs Ni. .Caneggio, Switzerland: Stamperia della Frontiera, 1985. Memoirs of a Bastard Angel (autobiography; preface by James Baldwin). New York: William Morrow, 1989; London: Bloomsbury, 1990. in French (translated by Richard Crevier).

Memoirs of a bastard angel Harold Norse. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Memoirs of a bastard angel Harold Norse. Download PDF book format. Download this format book. Book's title: Memoirs of a bastard angel Harold Norse. Library of Congress Control Number: 89033010.

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel" traces Norse's life and literary career with W. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, E. Cummings, Tennessee Williams, William Carlos Williams, James Baldwin, Dylan Thomas, William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Paul Bowles, Charles. ] With "Carnivorous Saint: Gay Poems 1941-1976" Norse became a leading gay liberation .

The author recounts his experiences in the literary and homosexual cultures of Europe, Africa, and America from the 1940s to the present, discussing his associations with W.H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, and others

Comments: (4)

Ber
I'd never heard of this guy until I stumbled onto the anthology he appeared in with Lamantia and Bukowski. He's one of the lesser lights of the Beat generation, although he's happy to be categorized as a 'raw-meat' poet.

I got tired of Norse about half way through. This is common for me. I like reading about young people's struggling more than mature people's determined slog.

I enjoyed the gossipy aspect of this. Norse certainly knew a lot of famous people.

One tiresome quality was his repeated angry complaints about antisemitism, although it was rarely aimed at him directly. And Norse doesn't identify as a Jew in any other way than this.

I didn't get any feeling of Norse having any great depth of character or feeling. His ultimate success seemed more a triumph of persistence and will-power than anything else. He was a kind of protege of William Carlos Williams and Norse quotes Williams praising his work quite a bit, but that didn't make that much of an impression on me. But I'm not really a consumer of fine art.

Happily, Norse doesn't quote his own poetry in this volume very much.

The only Beat author I ever enjoyed was Burroughs, and that was mostly for his drug experiences. Bukowski makes a couple appearances towards the end. I liked Bukowski back when I was a young man. He's been an inspiration to me, I guess.

The overall impression that this left me is of a vast world of artificiality that attains the solidity of the physical world as a result of billions of people believing in it.

Oh, and the sex was nice but not that moving.
Cktiell
This should be required reading for anyone writing or considering writing his/her memoirs. What a fabulous read. It's like a face-to-face with a friend who likes to dish. If you are gay, this should be a part of your library. If you are straight, read this for a clearer understanding of gay culture.
Perius
Over the past decade or so, The Beats have become white hot...so much so imitators have come crawling out of the woodwork with their own bad poetry or semi-autobiographical tales of the East Village.
Make no mistake about it: Harold Norse is the real thing...and more. From Barry Miles's book, The Beat Hotel: "...for a brief period -- from just after the publication of Howl in 1957 until the building was sold in 1963 -- it was home to Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Brion Gysin, Peter Orlovsky, Harold Norse, and a host of other luminaries of the Beat Generation."
Norse was there -- no only as witness -- but, much more importantly, particpant. And he wrote. Here's one of my favorite parts of the book:
"In February 1960, before moving into the Beat Hotel, I began doing ink drawings and cut-up poetry at the Hotel Univers on rue St. Grégoire de Tours next door to Edouard Roditi. He had often put me up at number 8 where, he said, Théodore de Banville had rented a room for Rimbaud.
Shortly after I moved into the Beat Hotel in April, I wrote Sniffing Keyholes, a sex/dope scene between a muscular black youth called Melo and a blond Russian princess called Z.Z. It was my first narrative cut-up. I felt I had broken through semantic and psychological barriers; hashish and opium helped with the aleatory process.
My experience of breaking new ground alarmed and exhilarated me. For awhile I believed I had lost my reason but didn’t consider it a great loss—the mind works in mysterious ways. Actually, word, image, and perception come together in a simultaneous jumble, not, as grammar and logic would have us believe, in a linear structure. I telescoped language in word clusters in a way James Joyce had pioneered, but with this difference: I allowed the element of chance to determine novel and surprising configurations of language. John Cage had done it in music, Pollock in painting. When I showed it to Brion Gysin he raved, “You’ve done something new! It’s a gas! Bill must see this right away.”
Bill Burroughs came down to my room. “Well, Harold, Brion says you’ve written a very funny cut-up. I’d love to see it.” In his fedora and topcoat he sat at the edge of my bed reading the piece, exploding in little sniffs and snorts, his equivalent of lusty guffaws. “This is marvelous,” he said, looking up. “You must show it to Girodias.” Maurice Girodias, owner of Olympia Press, had published Naked Lunch; his father had published Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer. But I wasn’t so sure he’d go mad about a few typewritten pages of cut-up. Burroughs disagreed. “I’m calling him right away to get you an appointment.”
A day or two later I trekked over to the office a few blocks away on the rue St. Séverin. I was right. Girodias read it and thought it similar to Burroughs. He wanted to see more but didn’t sound enthusiastic. “He missed the point,” snorted Burroughs. “He rejected Naked Lunch the first time it was offered to him.”
Poetry (Norse is one of Ferlinghetti's "Pocket Poets"), cut-up, essays, important correspondence (his letters to William Carlos Williams have been published, and soon to be are his letters to Charles Bukowski) and, most recently, this memoir; it's a fascinating look into the life of a writer who can't be pigeonholed into any category, whether it's Beat, Gay, or Counterculture. Norse is more than any label the critics will try and stick on his forehead. If you ask me, he's one of the 20th century's most overlooked writers, and with the paperback edition of this fine work, maybe His Day is just around the corner.
Jothris
Harold Norse, although unknown by many, was at the center of American poetry. He met Ginsberg on a subway in the 1940's, he lived in the Beat Hotel in Paris and did cutups, he was a secretary for WH Auden and had a long correspondence with both William Carlos Willians and Charles Bukowski. He chose the American idiom of Williams over the English formalism of Auden. He lived in Greenwich Villarge, Spain, Italy, Paris, San Francisco and other spots. He said of Bukowski that he was at war with his body. Norse became a vegetarian, worked out, and lived into his 90's. He's a wonderful poet but the academics won't go for him because there's nothing for them to explain.
Memoirs of a Bastard Angel download epub
Arts & Literature
Author: James Baldwin,Harold Norse
ISBN: 0688067042
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Arts & Literature
Language: English
Publisher: William Morrow & Co; 1st edition (November 1, 1989)
Pages: 447 pages