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Johnny Appleseed: The Man, the Myth, the American Story download epub

by Howard Means


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Howard Means produces a feast of a story that strips away the myths of this folk-tale hero and gives us the real .

Howard Means produces a feast of a story that strips away the myths of this folk-tale hero and gives us the real John Chapman and the rough-and-tumble world he lived in. This is a thoroughly fascinating and fun book. Jay Winik, author of April 1865 and The Great Upheaval. With insight and a lively touch, Howard Means tells us the story of the real Johnny Appleseed, John Chapman, a mystic and visionary who turns out to be a most memorable American character. Evan Thomas, author of The War Lovers.

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This portrait of Johnny Appleseed restores the flesh-and-blood man beneath the many myths. It captures the boldness of an iconic American life and the sadness of his last years, as the frontier marched past him, ever westward

This portrait of Johnny Appleseed restores the flesh-and-blood man beneath the many myths. It captures the boldness of an iconic American life and the sadn. It captures the boldness of an iconic American life and the sadness of his last years, as the frontier marched past him, ever westward. And it shows how death liberated the legend and made of Johnny a barometer of the nation’s feelings about its own heroic past and the supposed Eden it once had been. It is a book that does for America’s inner frontier what Stephen Ambrose’s Undaunted Courage did for its western one.

No American folk hero-not Davy Crockett, not even Daniel Boone-is better known than Johnny Appleseed, and none has become more trapped in his own legends.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. No American folk hero-not Davy Crockett, not even Daniel Boone-is better known than Johnny Appleseed, and none has become more trapped in his own legends. The fact is, John Chapman-the historical Johnny Appleseed-might well be the best-known figure from our national past about whom most people know almost nothing real at all. One early historian called Chapman the oddest character in all our history, and not without cause. And it shows how death liberated the legend and made of Johnny a barometer of the nation?s feelings about its own heroic past and the supposed Eden it once had been.

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Book Format: Choose an option. Howard Means does for America's inner frontier what Stephen Ambrose's Undaunted Courage did for its western one. Finally, the cliché is peeled away and the essence of this utterly American character is so revealing. John Chapman comes alive here and it is a thrilling experience to escape the specific gravity of the decades of myth (Ken Burns). This portrait of Johnny Appleseed restores the flesh-and-blood man beneath the many myths. It captures the boldness of an iconic American and the sadness of his last years, as the frontier marched past him, ever westward.

Johnny Appleseed Planted Stories Of Myth, Adventure Johnny Appleseed is the legendary frontiersman who planted . But how did John Chapman the man become Johnny Appleseed the folk hero? Means says Chapman may have helped his own legend grow

Johnny Appleseed Planted Stories Of Myth, Adventure Johnny Appleseed is the legendary frontiersman who planted orchards all over what's now the Midwest. But he was also a real man, a wanderer and evangelist who actively contributed to his own myth. Johnny Appleseed Planted Stories Of Myth, Adventure. But how did John Chapman the man become Johnny Appleseed the folk hero? Means says Chapman may have helped his own legend grow. I think at some point in his life, he set out to become Johnny Appleseed," Means says. He told a lot of stories about his adventures.

According to Howard Means, author of Johnny Appleseed: The Man, the Myth, the American Story no American folk hero has been more widely and diversely celebrated than Johnny Appleseed. Many movies and books have been produced in honor of this exceptional man. Children love to hear about his adventures and so do adults. He is an American legend and celebrated as a national hero. Written by Ellen Lloyd – AncientPages. com All rights reserved.

This portrait of Johnny Appleseed restores the flesh-and-blood man beneath the many myths. It captures the boldness of an iconic American life and the sadness of his last years, as the frontier marched past him, ever westward. And it shows how death liberated the legend and made of Johnny a barometer of the nation’s feelings about its own heroic past and the supposed Eden it once had been. It is a book that does for America’s inner frontier what Stephen Ambrose’s Undaunted Courage did for its western one. No American folk hero—not Davy Crockett, not even Daniel Boone—is better known than Johnny Appleseed, and none has become more trapped in his own legends. The fact is, John Chapman—the historical Johnny Appleseed—might well be the best-known figure from our national past about whom most people know almost nothing real at all. One early historian called Chapman “the oddest character in all our history,” and not without cause. Chapman was an animal whisperer, a vegetarian in a raw country where it was far easier to kill game than grow a crop, a pacifist in a place ruled by gun, knife, and fist. Some settlers considered Chapman a New World saint. Others thought he had been kicked in the head by a horse. And yet he was welcomed almost everywhere, and stories about him floated from cabin to cabin, village to village, just as he did. As eccentric as he was, John Chapman was also very much a man of his times: a land speculator and pioneer nurseryman with an uncanny sense for where settlement was moving next, and an evangelist for the Church of the New Jerusalem on a frontier alive with religious fervor. His story is equally America’s story at the birth of the nation. In this tale of the wilderness and its taming, author Howard Means explores how our national past gets mythologized and hired out. Mostly, though, this is the story of two men, one real and one invented; of the times they lived through, the ties that link them, and the gulf that separates them; of the uses to which both have been put; and of what that tells us about ourselves, then and now.

Comments: (7)

GawelleN
Howard Means has written a tremendously charming and instructive story that, if it were not true, would press the boundaries of a credible fictional figure. He takes the life of "Appleseed" and places it squarely in the context of 19th century "frontier" America, a place where characters as odd, as antisocial, as independent, as innovative, as other-worldly as Appleseed must have been more plentiful and -- more to the point -- where those oddities may have increased the chances of a successful life. The narrative is filled with endlessly interesting revelations about life in a country where the proximity and dynamic of the frontier were real and immediate: apple trees were, among other things, a method for perfecting a legal claim to a homestead; a way to get drunk as apples begat cider; and a biblical symbol. Like the sturdy, prolific and ultimately triumphant apple tree, this book rewards the reader with more than he bargained for. By all means, buy it, read it, give it as a gift, and then plant it when you are done.
Mamuro
Most of what I've known about Johnny Appleseed has been singing the song ("The Lord is good to me, and so I thank the Lord") and the tiny monument in Leominster on Rt 2, the "Johnny Appleseed Trail" (which later becomes the "Mohawk Trail)along the northern border of Massachusetts. It seems the challenge was in separating myth and legend from historic fact, with lots of myth and scarce reliable historical accounts available. Much time is spent putting John Chapman in his context, then tracing his wanderings. How does one get much to go on about a hermit? Part of the legend is Chapman's love of solitude, so his impact is sketchy at best. Nonetheless one gets about as clear a picture as can be expected in this interesting biography. I would have liked a photo section of how Chapman has been portrayed over the years; the illustrations that are provided are nonetheless helpful. A great book about a unique American.
I'm a Russian Occupant
If you count how many times the author says “not much is known about...” you will eventually wonder “why am I reading this?” I already knew not much about Johnny Appleseed.
Ygglune
Author Howard Means sets the tone of this work in the opening pages when says Johnny may be one of the oddest and yet most beloved characters in U.S. history. There is a real dichotomy here in that myth always supersedes the reality no matter how great it is of itself.

John Chapman aka Johnny Appleseed was born on 9/26/1774 to Nathaniel and Elizabeth Simons Chapman in Leominster, MA. He grew up with his sister Elizabeth and ten half-brothers/sisters near Longmeadow, MA before taking off when he was 22 with his half-brother Nathaniel who was six years his junior. With a family of 13 living in a small house one can understand why Johnny and Nathaniel might want to experience the west and more leg room as young vibrant males. The Chapmans first tramped about Pennsylvania for a while before moving westward into Ohio. In fact a great part of the book discusses the early settling of primarily Ohio with great mention of Pennsylvania with lesser note of Massachusetts, New York, and Indiana.

Johnny not only planted apple trees using the seeds he got free from Western Pennsylvania cider mills, as he thought that was more in keeping with God's way than grafting onto established trees. It was also infinity cheaper and he could carry all his future plants in a sack or two rather than needing a horse and wagon to transport seedlings. The problem was Johnny's big heart in giving away trees to people who couldn't pay. He did establish some orchards and sold some trees from them but was much more famous for simply planting apple seeds to start trees. Johnny supposedly loved all animals and nature alike. The myth goes that he would rather let a rattlesnake bite him than kill it. That seems to be a big of a stretch to me, but fighting the falsehoods in a legend is a no win situation. He is also credited with creating one of the first if not the first equine rescue operations in the country, which is another way he donated to the poor, in this case abused horses. It is assumed that Johnny actually started west to speculate in land which was a fairly good bet at the time, if you didn't give your profits away as Johnny did. In his lifetime he supposed purchased and lost some 1200 acres. He tried to buy some land from a Dutchman Peter Stednicki, whose land operation called the Holland Company would buy land at a million acres at a time get a bunch of investors to invest and then resell it to ultimate or intermediate buyers with them promising to settle the acreage or property. They would purchase the land from the government at 6 to 10 cents/acre [no that is not a misprint] and resell it for approximately 3.00/acre for farm acreage and 150 pounds for a town lot of 1/3 acre with a small house on it. This sounds surprisingly like the last real estate bubble to me. But like all Ponzi schemes, it works well for those who got in and out early in the game.

Johnny's main goal in life was to spread the word of a Swedish mystic named Emanuel Swedenborg, who founded the Church of the New Jerusalem or simply the New Church. Johnny really was a missionary with great zeal in everything he attempted, although a failure at what people who value monetary things the most would think.

Johnny died near Ft. Wayne, Indiana at age seventy.

I enjoyed the book and the history, but felt it got a little long in the tooth in the genealogy portions and the life of Swedenborg and his religious beliefs. But there are still many interesting facts and tales to keep you interested in this easily readable book of 320 pp with 40 pages of that index and notes.
Ceroelyu
This man has done his homework. A beautiful explanation of the real man behind the myth.
Watikalate
Johnny Appleseed, the man we all THINK we know. This book is extremely well-written and researched. Sometimes the author seems to squirrel off on a tangent, but he always brings it back. And his occasional one line zingers are a delight.
Keel
This efficient book is readable and well-researched. As the title says, it contains both the real history of Johnny Appleseed as we know him, and the various legends about him and the history of them. This is excellent writing and research, including the collateral subjects used to tell the related stories to the life of John Chapman.
Good book about the life of Jonatham Chapman aka Johnny Appleseed looks like spitter apples are in demand again to make the new cider brews. Genealogy of Johnny Appleseed in the book is very detailed and somewhat boring.
Johnny Appleseed: The Man, the Myth, the American Story download epub
Historical
Author: Howard Means
ISBN: 1439178259
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Historical
Language: English
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (April 12, 2011)
Pages: 336 pages