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The Grand Turk: Sultan Mehmet II - Conqueror of Constantinople and Master of an Empire download epub

by John Freely


Epub Book: 1906 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1901 kb.

When reading the legend of the Grand turk one is expected to learn famous conquest of Constantinople (no matter how .

When reading the legend of the Grand turk one is expected to learn famous conquest of Constantinople (no matter how many authors have covered the story before) as it is the pinnacle of Mehmet II's reign/life. However, the chapter was very short and brief. He describes Mehmet II’s ascension to power, at the young age of 21, beginning with his conquest of Constantinople in May of 1453, the last remnant of the Byzantine Empire.

the Grand Tur. Melville Jones, p. 12659 He is a man continuall. ibid. Sultan invade., Sphrantzes, p. 17663-64 He saw it and was amaze., Kritoboulos, p. 13664 ‘Proceeding according to pla., ibid.

II, p. 15058 ‘son of Sata. 58 ‘even to the sheddin., ibid ow very much indee. . 6559 ‘they shall be saf. p. 14159 The sovereign, the Grand Tur.

Also by John C. Maxwell: Empire crumbled but the other two imperial rulers of Europe, Kaiser Wilhelm. Maxwell:. of the evening, as Steve and I were walking to our car, he said to me, John, I bet That. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. Empire crumbled but the other two imperial rulers of Europe, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany and Tsar. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy.

Mehmet was barely twenty-one when he conquered Byzantine Constantinople, Sultan Mehmet II, known to his countrymen as 'the Conqueror' and to much of Europe as 'the Terror of the World,' was once Europe's most feared and powerful ruler. Now, Turkey?s most beloved American scholar, John Freely, brings to life this charismatic hero of one of the richest histories in the world.

Mehmet himself was an enigmatic figure

Three popes called for crusades against him as Christian Europe came face to face with a new Muslim empire. Mehmet himself was an enigmatic figure. Revered by the Turks and seen as a cruel and brutal tyrant by the west, he was a brilliant military leader but also a renaissance prince who had in his court Persian and Turkish poets, Arab and Greek astronomers and Italian scholars and artists.

Автор: Freely John Название: The Grand Turk: Sultan Mehmet II.Jem Sultan was a son of Sultan Mehmet II, known as the Conqueror after his capture of Constantinople in 1453

This book captures the flavour of daily life as well as court ceremonial and intrigue. It also includes a gazetteer of major monuments and museums. Jem Sultan was a son of Sultan Mehmet II, known as the Conqueror after his capture of Constantinople in 1453. When Mehmet died in 1481 Jem and his brother Beyazet fought a year-long war for the succession.

Sultan Mehmet II, known to his countrymen as the "the Conqueror" and to much of Europe as "the Terror of the World," was once Europe's most feared and powerful ruler. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Sultan Mehmet II, known to his countrymen as 'the Conqueror' and to much of Europe as 'the Terror of the World .

Sultan Mehmet II, known to his countrymen as 'the Conqueror' and to much of Europe as 'the Terror of the World,' was once Europe's most feared and powerful ruler. Three popes called for crusades against him as Christian Europe came face to face with a new Muslim empire.

Автор: Freely John Название: The Grand Turk: Sultan Mehmet II - Conqueror of Constantinople and Master of an Empire Издательство: Random House (USA) Классификация: ISBN: 159020400X ISBN-13(EAN): 9781590204009 ISBN: 1-59020-400-X ISBN-13(EAN): 978-1-59020-40 Обложка/Формат: Paperback Дата издания: 3. 0. This book captures the flavour of daily life as well as court ceremonial and intrigue.

About book: THE CAPTURE OF OTRANTO 163 ‘for it is of cours., Setton, vol. II, p. 361164 We think of nothing els. Other books by John Freely. Strolling Through Istanbul: The Classic Guide to the City. 343165 ‘fire, flame, rui., Babinger, p. 391165 This morning four horseme. Setton, vol. 343165 ‘the number of ship. pp. 343-4165 ‘who says tha. 344166 ‘by a great miracl., Schwoebel, p. 144166 ‘Venetian merchants had suffere. 340167 In Rome the alar. Pastor, vol. IV, p. 334168 Sixtus IV would hav.

Sultan Mehmet II, known to his countrymen as the "the Conqueror" and to much of Europe as "the Terror of the World," was once Europe's most feared and powerful ruler.

Comments: (7)

LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
The book lacks the insight into who Mehmet was i.e the person. Instead it dwelt on the battles he won without a map to explain where and how the battles were won and lost. With a book like this, a reader expects to make reference to the 15th century map of the area. There are only two maps in the entire book. The first one is the monuments in Istanbul probably taken from a tourist guide or something. The second one is a map of the region but sadly it is totally illegible in terms of font size and resolution. The readers were thus left dumbfounded and overwhelmed with unfamiliar names and places.

When reading the legend of the Grand turk one is expected to learn famous conquest of Constantinople (no matter how many authors have covered the story before) as it is the pinnacle of Mehmet II's reign/life. However, the chapter was very short and brief.

I dont usually notice typos in books but I noticed quite a few. In the last chapter about Istanbul, the typos related to the population in the city is glaring. He must have used "million" when he meant "thousand".
Monam
The book provided a lot of information on Constantinople (Istanbul) if you happen to being going there for a visit. The book really provided little insight into the person of Mehmet. It simply stated repeatedly that he won this battle or conquered this country/territory but never provided any insight into how the military functioned or why they were able to win every battle. Pretty dry but there are few books on Mehmet so it is somewhat useful for reference
Bremar
Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of the early period of the Ottoman Empire and the spread of Islam and Ottoman domination into Asia and Eastern Europe. However, I think it should be important to note this book doesn’t have enough maps. The ones included by the author in this book are shrunk down so far, that it’s difficult to see the tiny script. With this subject, most readers would need to refer to maps throughout the reading of the book.

Freely’s book is not deep in descriptive depth, but then……… the book is short at only 225 pages. He describes Mehmet II’s ascension to power, at the young age of 21, beginning with his conquest of Constantinople in May of 1453, the last remnant of the Byzantine Empire. But he is less vivid in his description of the actual, and verified by other chroniclers, murderous 3 day rampage of raping, killing, and looting through the captured city by his “soldiers of God” after they breached the walls. These were his rewards to his soldiers for their efforts during the 6 weeks of siege.

The description of Mehmet II, “The Conqueror” as he was called, shows his insatiable appetite for the destruction and subjugation of any civilizations that were not subservient to him and the Islamic religion. Maps and geography were studied intently by The Conqueror as he planned the next “campaign” for his generals and himself. Spaces on these maps that weren’t noted as “Ottoman,” were all targets. Only lightly does Freely describe what must have been the unbelievably savage attacks served up on these infidel nations and their citizens. An example, and only one of many slight notations in Freely’s book glossing over the brutality of his conquests was “…. Mehmet slaughtered all 6,000, or so inhabitants, including women and children – a savage example that lead Greeks in other places to surrender to him without a struggle.” The man was, in actuality, a blood-thirsty, remorseless killer. He lived for only one reason: war.

When reading Freely’s book, I’d recommend that the reader “prime” himself beforehand with other books on Turkish history, so that he can read between the lines and imagine the actual horror this “Grand Turk” foisted upon the world at that time, as it was obvious to me that Freely didn’t want to “tarnish” the legacy of the “Grand Turk.”

Freely touches on other subjects in complete chapters, such as a good description of the renovations and additions that Mehmet II made to his new capitol, Istanbul, after his conquest and during his reign. He also gives adequate descriptions of the governmental offices, administrators, and government structure he implemented during that time. These chapters give substance to his book, and make for interesting reading, and perhaps “humanize” this butcher a bit.

It’s a good read, and covers the time of the “Grand Turk” quite well, but the actual brutality of this man was minimized and does not adequately describe the barbarian that he actually was. As with any despot, his word was the final word and there was no power to overturn, or even discuss, any decisions he made. A mere question about any of his decisions could, and often did, mean execution. He executed anyone he wanted to execute, by any means he could dream up – impaling, gouging out of eyes, sawing people in half, burning them alive, etc. And of course, there was the fully endorsed enslavement of any women and boys who were captured as a result of his armies over running their opponents in battle, their fates only vaguely alluded to in Freely’s book.

His campaigns sent terror through European nations who envisioned his troops marching on their soil and sailing into their waters. He appeared to be an unstoppable force. But, he was confronted with a force with which he could form no defense …………… his own death. Fortunately for Europe at that time, after assembling another huge army, as he began a march south towards Rhodes or Egypt, (it was never revealed which was his target), he became ill. The illness was fatal and he expired in his 49th year, 1481, thereby halting another imminent slaughter of soldiers and citizens whose only crime was that they would not submit to him as his subjects and convert to his religion.
Phalaken
This is the first bio I have read about Sultan Mehmet, so I gained a great amount of new knowledge of the Ottoman Empire. Fairly impressed, although for the most part, this book is a bio of the warrior side of Sultan Mehmet. The last three chapters were quick overviews of the Ottoman Empire after his death, which does nothing for the biography. Very detailed about certain battles, about the rebuilding of Istanbul and about some of the erpsons important in his life. If viewed as a travel book of the area, it is very good for checking places to see. It is clear the writer loves the topic, the area and Turkey. Worth the read.
Zahisan
An easy read for a history book. Has enough background to set the stage for an overview of the man who made a major impact on civilization not just what he did. The Turks were a major player in how western and eastern Europe was shaped from 1071 (first defeat of Byzantine emperor by the Turks) to 1923 (the formation of modern Turkey) The book covers the key time period around 1453 when Constantinople was conquered. The only thing I found distracting was the effort the author spent unnecessarily in my opinion to use Turkish spelling of words author felt were exclusively Turkish. I was not interested in correct Turkish spelling or correct Turkish pronounciation.
funike
Biased. Author spends so much time trying to make Sultan Mehmet seem like a ruthless killer. Makes you questions all these executions that the author claims Sultan Mehmet II did, a man who built so many mosques, was inent on making sure other religions continued to practice their religions, a man who did not care much about looking fancy and wearing fancy clothing, a man who refused to destroy places of worship of the lands he conquered. This same man is executing all these people ruthlessly? something doesn't add up.
Shakataxe
Great book, shows the true man whom history has almost forgotten.
Quite uniteresting but very useful for the report I was doing
The Grand Turk: Sultan Mehmet II - Conqueror of Constantinople and Master of an Empire download epub
Historical
Author: John Freely
ISBN: 159020400X
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Historical
Language: English
Publisher: Overlook Books (December 28, 2010)
Pages: 265 pages