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Fortune's Children download epub

by Arthur T. II Vanderbilt


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In Fortune's Children, Arthur T. Vanderbilt II paints a vivid portrait of his ancestors

In Fortune's Children, Arthur T. Vanderbilt II paints a vivid portrait of his ancestors. The author states that the fortune dissipated quickly because the Commodore was the first and only Vanderbilt who was obsessed with making money. The Vanderbilt men who followed were obsessed with keeping it. You need both to maintain those bank balances.

FORTUNE’S CHILDREN Arthur T. Vanderbilt II EPIGRAPH Generations pass while some tree stands, and old families last not three oaks. sir thomas browne contents epigraph. Arthur T. Vanderbilt II. EPIGRAPH. Generations pass while some tree stands, and old families last not three oaks.

Fortune's Children book. Vanderbilt: the very name signifies wealth.

Vanderbilt: the very name signifies wealth. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. The family patriarch, "the Commodore," built up a fortune that made him the world's richest man by 1877. Yet, less than fifty years after the Commodore's death, one of his direct descendants died penniless, and no Vanderbilt was counted among the world's richest people. Fortune's Children tells the dramatic story of all the amazingly colorful spenders who dissipated such a vast inheritance. Biographies Politicians & Historical Figures.

When Dr. Linsly told the Commodore he was well enough to see all of his children, the Commodore responded in a sudden rage, No, damn them, they are all bastards but Bill.

Fortune's Children - Arthur T. VANDERBILT. When Dr. Alone in the large, sunny second-floor room at the southeast corner of the house, propped up in his bed in the middle of the chamber where he could gaze out the window or at his safe in the corner, the Commodore dozed and dreamed, drifting in and out of consciousness.

Fortune's Children tells the dramatic story of all the amazingly colorful spenders who dissipated such a vast inheritance.

Imprint: William Morrow Paperbacks.

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The family patriarch, "the Commodore," built up a fortune that mad.

Arthur T. The family patriarch, "the Commodore," built up a fortune that mad. ISBN10 : 9780688103866, ISBN13 : 0688103863.

For fans of Downton Abbey, a real-life American version of the Crawley familyFortune's Children is an enthralling true story that recreates the drama, splendor, and wealth of the legendary Vanderbilts. Vanderbilt: The very name is synonymous with the Gilded Age. The family patriarch, "the Commodore," built a fortune that made him the world's richest man by 1877.

For fans of Downton Abbey, a real-life American version of the Crawley family—Fortune's Children is an enthralling true story that recreates the drama, splendor, and wealth of the legendary Vanderbilts.

Vanderbilt: The very name is synonymous with the Gilded Age. The family patriarch, "the Commodore,” built a fortune that made him the world's richest man by 1877. Yet, less than fifty years after his death, no Vanderbilt was counted among the world's richest people. Written by descendant Arthur T. Vanderbilt II, Fortune's Children traces the dramatic and amazingly colorful history of this great American family, from the rise of industrialist and philanthropist Cornelius Vanderbilt to the fall of his progeny—wild spendthrifts whose profligacy bankrupted a vast inheritance.


Comments: (7)

Ubranzac
I almost never buy paper copies of books, but after reading this on my Kindle I went and purchased this in physical form to give out to friends.

I had just got done reading an extremely dry, very boring, biography of Commodore Vanderbilt. I frankly do not know why I tortured myself with finishing it. However, Fortune's Children, was a breath of fresh air after that. It is anything but boring and dry.

This book breathes life into a fascinating sociological part of American history: the Gilded Age. Prior to reading this book, I really did not have an appreciation for this time in history. The extravagance and the opulence (before income tax existed!) that this book details is fascinating. The book delivers its message without being gossipy, but it also does not bore with dry and academic droll. The author has a wonderful grasp on his style, and walks the line between personal family history and historical account with wonderfully professional ability. At no point did I feel like I was reading a gossip tabloid (I am currently reading a bio by another author that feels that way and it feels cheap and sultry).

In summary the book was extremely well written, captured my attention on every single page, and was one of my most favorite historical bio books of all time.
Beydar
By fair means and foul, Cornelius "Commodore" Vanderbilt built a fortune of $105 million in the mid-nineteenth century. One hundred years later, most of that fortune was gone.

In Fortune's Children, Arthur T. Vanderbilt II paints a vivid portrait of his ancestors. The Commodore is one of the most important capitalists this country has ever produced, and with the marriage of his great-granddaughter to the Duke of Marlborough, this book will make excellent reading for any fan of Downton Abbey.

The author states that the fortune dissipated quickly because the Commodore was the first and only Vanderbilt who was obsessed with making money. The Vanderbilt men who followed were obsessed with keeping it. You need both to maintain those bank balances. Some-- like Alva Belmont Vanderbilt-- were obsessed with spending it to ram their way into New York's high society. Alva built some of the largest and most ostentatious homes ever to grace these shores, and the houses' interiors were even more lavish than their exteriors. Each of the author's ancestors is portrayed with wit and sorrow, which can often happen with the "advantage" of hindsight.

This is an absorbing tale of greed, snobbery, and profligacy that kept me fascinated from first page to last. If this is your cup of tea, I urge you to pour yourself some.
Deodorant for your language
Living close to Newport and the Mansions and having visited them many many times I was interested in the lives behind these fantastic houses. This book was extremely informative and easy to read. Some folks have commented that it was boring. I disagree, it wasn't at all and I never read these biography types of books. It was very interesting, it followed the generations down through the ages and explained exactly how they all squandered such a great fortune. Yes, most were an incredible bunch of snobs - its amazing how ridiculous they were and how they had to try to outdo each other, who they accepted into their "400" society, the rules of engagement, clothes of the day, fashion, "The Season", the trips to Paris, private yachts, Italian marble everywhere, marrying for money, many divorces - THUS the Gilded age, but truly they more or less lived in Gilded Cages and for the most part money didn't buy them all happiness but created unreasonable demands. A lot of historical information about the buildings of the first railroads. I wish the book had more photos; it has some. However, everytime a new Vanderbilt character was introduced in the book I simply searched them up on Yahoo. I do think its a shame that all of those beautiful, artistic mansions on 5th Avenue are gone though. I'm glad the Newport Preservation Society has saved the remaining mansions of the time in Newport. Ostentatious as they are, they are still a magnificent example of the architecture of the time and William Morris Hunt, et als, talents. If you ever get the chance to visit Newport, I do suggest Marble House and Breakers, also enjoy the Cliff Walk that takes you behind the mansions.

NOTE - This Kindle version has a bit of digital typos. Many times I saw "your" as "tour", the word I'll was I'11 and some odd characters. Also there are some things I read on the web that weren't in alignment with what was published in the book - some discrepancies. A few dates of marriage or ages at death, how a few folks met - nothing huge, just a few things that didn't line up, but who's to say which was incorrect; minor details that didn't distract from this fascinating history. The trial information on Gloria Vanderbilt Sr and Gloria Jr had contrasting views from the book to the information on various web pages. The book paints Gloria Sr as being more or less framed by her unstable mother and the Vanderbilts. It also portrays Gloria Jr as a spoiled horrible brat who acted and pretended to be sick so they could blame the mother and pull her away from her. A lot of the information on the web paints Gloria Sr as being a horrible mother and unstable herself . Regardless, its still amazing what money can buy - and it bought Gloria Jr the ponies, houses and friends she wanted.

Lastly - one reader makes note that Anderson Cooper wasn't mentioned in the book - No he wasn't.. the book was published in 1989, before Anderson's rise to fame and his OWN personal fortune. (He would have been 22 years old then!) It does omit that fact that Gloria Vanderbilt was one of the last of the name that is a millionaire though. It did say there was a reunion and not one was a millionaire - well maybe Gloria didn't show up! LOL!
Neol
An excellent book, keeps you wanting to read more and it gives it to you. This book tells of the gaining of the great wealth by Commodore Vanderbilt and what each one of his children and subsequent generations did with his money after his death, until, finally all was spent and there were no more Vanderbilt millionaires. I also enjoyed hearing about the "Gilded Age,"the mansions in Newport, R.I., where the "summer" cottages of the rich were. This book will not disappoint.
Inabel
Great historical book about the Commodore, what happened to the kids and the wealth. Just an amazing family and captivating story. Great American entrepreneurial story. And also a great study of how quickly 1-2 generations can drain a family's wealth dry. If you like reading about great American families that built America, and the gilded era, then you'll love reading this book. Just amazing how much land the Vanderbilt's owned in Manhattan. To think that all those stores along 5th Avenue were once Vanderbilt homes, sickens my stomach. We don't cherish history here in the US. Those great homes from this era should have been preserved, like they do in Newport, Rhode Island. I love looking for old photos on the Internet of these magnificent homes. It was an amazing era for America.
Fortune's Children download epub
Historical
Author: Arthur T. II Vanderbilt
ISBN: 0688103863
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Historical
Language: English
Publisher: WmMorrowPB; Reprint edition (February 20, 1991)
Pages: 512 pages