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Street Without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria download epub

by Kapka Kassabova


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Kapka Kassabova has written a superb book that I highly recommend to anyone interested in good writing, Bulgaria, Eastern Europe, life under Communism, the rich history and mystifying mythology of that area of the world. It has an intimate quality about it that makes her personal reflections about her life, family and country poignant, totally captivating and universally appealing. Don't be fooled by the sad quality of the opening chapters on her childhood.

Street Without a Name book. Unfortunately, the travel section is the longer, so I’m rounding down.

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Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Street Without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria. Kapka Kassabova has written a superb book that I highly recommend to anyone interested in good writing, Bulgaria, Eastern Europe, life under Communism, the rich history and mystifying mythology of that area of the world.

Street Without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria. Kapka Kassabova's experience was rather different. While most people in Europe have heard of Bulgaria, very few can claim to know anything about it, its culture and its people. 352pp, Portobello Books, £1. 9. Britons don't face too much grief when travelling abroad. She learned early on, after moving to England in her teens in 1990, that her Bulgarian heritage bred not interest among her classmates but contempt: "The chief heart-throb, Jamie, was also the chief bully.

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ISBN 13: 978-1-74253-900-3. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Categories: Non-fiction. 1. Worldviews: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Science.

Bulgarian emigré Kapka Kassabova has written Street without a Name: Childhood and Other . KAPKA KASSABOVA was born in Bulgaria in 1973 and learned to speak English at the age of 16 when her parents emigrated to England and then New Zealand.

Bulgarian emigré Kapka Kassabova has written Street without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria (2008), both moving. STREET WITHOUT A NAME: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. She now lives in Edinburgh, and is the author of two novels, four poetry collections (the latest, Geography for the Lost, published by Bloodaxe in April 2007) and a couple of travel guides.

It is from this implausible position that Kapka Kassabova's bitterly funny, brilliantly clever journey through her childhood and her troubled country breaks down a Berlin Wall of indifference towards her compatriots. Observing that Bulgaria generally merits the shortest entry in any travel book, she resolves in her opening chapter "to write my own Bulgaria into being". You are currently logged out.

Kapka Kassabova (born in November 1973, in Bulgarian Капка Касабова) is a. .

Kapka Kassabova (born in November 1973, in Bulgarian Капка Касабова) is a poet and writer of fiction and narrative non-fiction. Her mother tongue is Bulgarian, but she writes in English. Scotland on Sunday described it as "A memorable piece of acutely observed writing where events are relayed. with a novelist’s eye.

Kassabova was born in Sofia, Bulgaria and grew up under the drab, muddy, grey mantle of one of communism’s most mindlessly authoritarian regimes. Escaping with her family as soon as possible after the collapse of the Berlin Wall, she lived in Britain, New Zealand, and Argentina, and several other places. But when Bulgaria was formally inducted to the European Union she decided it was time to return to the home she had spent most of her life trying to escape. What she found was a country languishing under the strain of transition. This two-part memoir of Kapka’s childhood and return explains life on the other side of the Iron Curtain.

Comments: (7)

Jarortr
Kapka Kassabova has written a superb book that I highly recommend to anyone interested in good writing, Bulgaria, Eastern Europe, life under Communism, the rich history and mystifying mythology of that area of the world. It has an intimate quality about it that makes her personal reflections about her life, family and country poignant, totally captivating and universally appealing. Don't be fooled by the sad quality of the opening chapters on her childhood. The narrative builds as her tour of her country progress through her journey to all the places in her memory and through the geography and history of one of the oldest and most complex places in Europe. She returned from a 14 year exile and world travel to find her roots, or what is left of them, in her place of birth. Full of memorable stories, her story of meeting a woman survivor of the communist era concentration camps during one of her many train rides was most remarkable. The woman characterizes the camp as being like the ones that the Nazi's had. Then she qualifies that by saying that the Holocaust was really over-stated and that it never really happened. Why do you care about Jews, she asks Kapka. Are you a Jew? The ironies and complexities of our past rise to the top throughout this fine volume. I don't know if Kassabova found the peace in her soul that she was searching for, but she certainly provides a soulful experience for anyone who reads this book.
Kagda
This is a beautifully written nostalgic tour through the author and Bulgaria's history. Humorously sharing stories from her Cold War childhood, Kassabova recounts her past and current travels throughout the country. Never mocking, but always with an honest eye, she shares the varied histories of the towns and the people she encounters along the way.
Flower
This is the author's personal reflection of her life in Bulgaria under the last 2 decades of socialism and a trip to revisit places of personal importance for her 20 years later. While the account of life under socialism is very accurate, it has a darker hue, which may not be shared by other people who lived in those times there. Yet, it is a personal reflection, of a child growing up in the ugly panel block suburbs, in a young family who struggled to create a normal life and home, while managing two careers and two young daughters. Despite the darker hue of the pictures I find the account lovable with its honesty and sense of humour. The account of the journey 20 years later is also delightful and honest. A highly recommended book for anyone interested in Bulgaria.
Anardred
A really interesting perspective on Bulgaria. I thoroughly enjoyed this book as an introduction to the complxity of the country and it's people. I started reading this book on the plane into Sofia, and many of Kapka's observations ring true. (including my baggage being lost!!) a very readable insight into Bulgaria.
Erienan
5 stars though the translation was a little awkward. Beautiful funny political heartbraking and heartwarming all in one. Thank you Kapka.
Fonceiah
This is an eastern european travelogue from the point of view of an ambivalent expatriate returning home, which gives an added dimension compared to travelogues of interested foreigners like, say, Rebecca West. (There's a point when the narratives of this book and "Black Lamb and Grey Falcon" almost touch, in the chapter dealing with Macedonia.)

The first and more autobiographical half of the book was often quite poignant, as were the later parts in which the author visits her ailing, lonely relatives and the places of her youth.
Kulalas
This book of coming of age after the fall of communism in Bulgaria was fascinating. I enjoyed it tremendously,although once I moved to Bulgaria I found that many Bulgarian criticized it for the author's accuracy. That said, memoir is told from one's individual experience, as they interpret it. Overall, I think this is a fine book, by a fine writer.
Good read
Street Without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria download epub
Historical
Author: Kapka Kassabova
ISBN: 1602396450
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Historical
Language: English
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing; 1st Edition edition (August 1, 2009)
Pages: 348 pages