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Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps download epub

by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald


Epub Book: 1404 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1826 kb.

Looking Like the Enemy book. The author at 16 years old was evacuated with her family to an internment camp for Japanese Americans, along with 110,000 other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast.

Looking Like the Enemy book. She faced an indefinite sentence behind barbed wire in crowded, primitive camps. She struggled for survival and dignity, and endured psychological scarring that has lasted a lifetime.

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald lives in Seattle, Washington. She will be 80 years old in 2005 when this book is published

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald lives in Seattle, Washington. She will be 80 years old in 2005 when this book is published. This is her first book and of considerable significance for her generation and as a Nissei. She will be breaking the silence of telling her story, in-depth, about her years imprisoned for being Japanese in America. Heartbreaking and insightful, "Looking Like the Enemy" is a book that deserves to be read by every American so that the crime that was committed during World War II might not be committed again. It should be included on every High School reading list.

They were sent to California's Tule Lake Internment Camp.

By Mary Matsuda Gruenewald. How to cite this paper: Cheung, F. (2014). American Internment Camps. By Mary Matsuda Gruenewald. xi-227 pp. Advances in Literary Study, 2, 93-94. Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of. Imprisonment in Japanese American.

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald’s book, published in 2005, deviates from this trend. on the 442nd Regimental Combat Team; her own training as a nurse; and her family’s eventual return to Vashon Island.

The author at 16 years old was evacuated with her family to an internment camp for Japanese Americans, along with 110,000 other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast.

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In 1941, Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was a teenage girl who, like .

In 1941, Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was a teenage girl who, like other Americans, reacted with horror to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. For sixty years, Mary Matsuda Gruenewald chose not to talk about her experiences in the Japanese-American internment camps during the Second World War. Forced into those camps as a confused, na?ve seventeen-year-old, she was unable to comprehend her situation, and until the early twenty-first century was not prepared to explore this region of her personal - and her country's - history.

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald. Looking Like the Enemy is a captivating read that answered a lot of questions I had regarding the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII. Knowing several Japanese-Americans while going to school.

The author at 16 years old was evacuated with her family to an internment camp for Japanese Americans, along with 110,000 other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast. She faced an indefinite sentence behind barbed wire in crowded, primitive camps. She struggled for survival and dignity, and endured psychological scarring that has lasted a lifetime.This memoir is told from the heart and mind of a woman now nearly 80 years old who experienced the challenges and wounds of her internment at a crucial point in her development as a young adult. She brings passion and spirit to her story. Like "The Diary of Anne Frank," this memoir superbly captures the emotional and psychological essence of what it was like to grow up in the midst of this profound dislocation and injustice in the U.S. Few other books on this subject come close to the emotional power and moral significance of this memoir.In the end,the reader is buoyed by what Mary learns from her experiences and what she is able to do with her life. In 2005 she becomes one more Nissei who breaks her silence.

Comments: (7)

Nenayally
My parents were interned at Heart Mountain Wyoming while my Uncle was a part of the MIS. They never talked about their experience as if it was an embarrassment. My mother would only refer to their time in relocation as being in "camp". After reading this book, I realized that the amount of discrimination experienced by my parents in So, California was far greater than what the author experienced in Washington. Nevertheless, I was glad to read that the author was willing to bear her soul in writing this book and expose what has been hidden in mine. Thank you.

A must-read for all those to compare what is being debated today. The difference however legal vs illegal
anneli
A very engaging personal account of a dark period in our country's history of which many have little or no knowledge. As a result of reading this book I was pleased to have the opportunity to visit Manzanar, a fine museum in California.which preserves some buildings and much of the history of this internment camp. As informative and interesting as the visit was it would have been far less meaningful had I not read this book. I have recommended this book to many others, as I believe it is particularly relevant given our current political climate. The observant and sensitive reader will undoubtedly find many disturbing parallels.
fire dancer
Most of us have probably read "Farewell to Manzanar". In "Looking Like the Enemy" we are offered yet another perspective, one written by an older woman looking backwards, a woman who had grown up in the relatively protected world of the Pacific Northwest, in a place where people were her friends and saw the forced internment of the Japanese-Americans as fundamentally wrong. Heartbreaking and insightful, "Looking Like the Enemy" is a book that deserves to be read by every American so that the crime that was committed during World War II might not be committed again. It should be included on every High School reading list.
Uanabimo
Everybody should learn about what the japanese in this country were put through during WW2, because I had no idea, Im 34yrs..and I didn't learn about this till recently and I think I stumbled upon a comment someone made from a video I watched on youtube.. unrelated to the subject, someone made a comment on internment camps..I was like huh? what the hell is that? we did what? So I started looking up for books on amazon about it and this is one I found. If your curious read this book, or want to know a dark part of our history, read this book.
Jaiarton
This is a great story about a dark time in America's history. Post Pearl Harbor, there was a scare across America of who was able to be trusted. Many families had come to America from Asia looking for a better life. Even though many of the children were full American citizens, the scare was too strong. We placed our own people in camps to make sure the country was safe. Many people lost their land, possessions, family members, and opportunities to move forward.
Ueledavi
Excellent book about true events experienced by Japanese Americans who were hard-working citizens. The paranoia and ignorance that came from U.S. citizens and the gov't cannot be forgotten or repeated. Japanese Americans were guilty by reason of race, and were considered as being enemy aliens. The Japanese people have a culture filled with integrity. strength, courage, and honor.
Burking
Even if one is aware of the internment of the American Japanese, I doubt that most people can form any real idea of what it was like without reading a personal chronicle like this. It is difficult to express how painful it is to read, and I already knew the basic story. Sure, now we know that it didn't turn into a second Holocaust, but the people in the camps didn't have that comforting foreknowledge. One needs to be reminded that although the intense portions of a tragedy may be long over with, the ramifications for the people who suffered through it can last all their lives, even for those who didn't lose everything that they had owned before the catastrophe.

Jeanne Wakatusi Houston also wrote a classic memoir: Farewell to Manzanar: A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment, and it is well worth reading both of the books for the similarities and differences between the two experiences. Houston was perhaps 8 or 10 years younger than Mary Matsuda, and her family dynamics were quite different, so they really complement one another. Being older, Mary Matsuda had to confront personally and directly issues that Jeanne Wakatusi Houston didn't, although of course her family members did. JWH tells us more about her life after the camps; MMG ends her books in 1945, with only an afterword summarizing the later lives of the Matsudas.

I found the book very vivid. I could easily imagine how I would feel having to destroy so much family history, even being afraid to keep a set of dolls lest it add fuel to the anti-Japanese fervor. And I feel that I have some inkling of what it was like to live for years under constant strain, not knowing what would come next, or if it would ever end. I was close to crying at points, which is unusual for me. The Matsudas lived on Vashon Island in the Puget Sound, which should make the book all the more interesting to fans of Guterson's Snow Falling on Cedars: A Novel.

The book includes a bibliography, a glossary and numerous black-and-white photographs of the Matsudas and the camps.
I enjoy all the Manzanar (and other concentration camps) books and have many. Most of my childhood friends and their families were in these camps. Sad time in our history.
Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps download epub
Leaders & Notable People
Author: Mary Matsuda Gruenewald
ISBN: 0939165538
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: NewSage Press; F First Paperback Edition Used edition (March 10, 2005)
Pages: 240 pages