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Loon: A Marine Story download epub

by Jack McLean


Epub Book: 1776 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1468 kb.

McLean's debut is a perceptive memoir of the Vietnam wa. cLean reconstructs his time in the Marines with a sharp eye for detail and very readable- at times almost poetic-prose.

McLean's debut is a perceptive memoir of the Vietnam wa. The third of four children, Jack McLean was born in Huntington, New York, on May 26, 1947. He was brought up in Summit, New Jersey, where he lived until admittance to Phillips Academy, Andover, at age fourteen.

In Loon, McLean takes readers from Andover’s privileged campus, to the infamous Marine Corps boot camp at. .The seeds for Loon: A Marine Story were planted in 1993. I was working in Washington, .

The seeds for Loon: A Marine Story were planted in 1993. I’d had no contact with my marine buddies since I departed Vietnam in July 1968.

Adjectives such as exceptional and sublime are accurate enough, and yet somehow do not convey the depth of my enjoyment and admiration for this memoir of a young man who left a life of comfort and privilege to enlist in the United States Marine Corps at a time when combat duty in Vietnam was all but certain.

Loon: A Marine Story. Loon: A Marine Story. Download (epub, . 7 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Book Description A lyrical memoir of a prep school boy who creates his own path to higher learning: enlisting in the .

Kids like me didn't go to Vietnam, writes Jack McLean in his compulsively readable memoir. Raised in suburban New Jersey, he attended the Phillips Academy in Andover, MA, but decided to put college on hold. After graduation in the spring of 1966, faced with the mandatory military draft, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps for a two-year stint. Vietnam at the time was a country, and not yet a war, he writes.

McLean’s story climaxes with the horrific three-day Battle for Landing Zone Loon in June, 1968. Fought on a remote hill in the northwestern corner of South Vietnam, McLean bore witness to the horror of war and was forever changed. He returned home six weeks later to a country largely ambivalent to his service.

Электронная книга "Loon: A Marine Story", Jack McLean

Электронная книга "Loon: A Marine Story", Jack McLean. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Loon: A Marine Story" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Presidio Press, 2009. At LZ Loon, McLean and his comrades-in-arms would spend the next three days in intense, almost uninterrupted combat against numerically superior NVA forces. For McLean, this was both his first and last major combat engagement. It was the bloody climax of his combat tour in Vietnam, and fittingly forms the absorbing climax of his memoir. For those three days in June 1968 Charlie and Delta Companies 1/4 were the war in Vietnam.

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“Kids like me didn’t go to Vietnam,” writes Jack McLean in his compulsively readable memoir. Raised in suburban New Jersey, he attended the Phillips Academy in Andover, MA, but decided to put college on hold. After graduation in the spring of 1966, faced with the mandatory military draft, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps for a two-year stint. “Vietnam at the time was a country, and not yet a war,” he writes. It didn’t remain that way for long.A year later, after boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina, and stateside duty in Barstow, California, the Vietnam War was reaching its peak. McLean, like most available Marines, was retrained at Camp Pendleton, California, and sent to Vietnam as a grunt to serve in an infantry company in the northernmost reaches of South Vietnam. McLean’s story climaxes with the horrific three-day Battle for Landing Zone Loon in June, 1968. Fought on a remote hill in the northwestern corner of South Vietnam, McLean bore witness to the horror of war and was forever changed. He returned home six weeks later to a country largely ambivalent to his service.Written with honesty and insight, Loon is a powerful coming-of-age portrait of a boy who bears witness to some of the most tumultuous events in our history, both in Vietnam and back home.

Comments: (7)

Rolorel
I was at LZ Loon. I served with Golf Battery 3/12 as an FO with Delta CO 1/4. Details are pretty accurate. I never knew this book existed. If a person is interested in knowing about the incompetence of Senior Officers without proper recon or intelligence, inserting two valiant Marine Companies into a hornets nest and subject them to direct fire from a known enemy artillery position in Laos, without artillery that could return fire and helicopters that were being shot down and rendered helpless, you should read the book. It is a true and accurate story. Many Marines fought that day, with rifles, e-tools, knives, rocks or whatever they could use to kill. Some died, many were wounded, but many more NVA lay dead......
Feri
This is a book that everyone who didn't serve in Vietnam should read. It tells it like it was, in a manner that shows what it was like to the 'grunt' who was the one who was on the front lines. There is no embellishment of war, nor is there any complaining about having to be there fighting the war that nobody wanted. It just tells it like it was! As a person who attempted to volunteer in 1963 and was told that I wasn't eligible, because I had a wife and two kids,, and then later became grateful that I couldn't go when I learned how we shouldn't have been there, I am grateful for those of my friends (and others) for their service. I only wish there was some way to tell them how much I appreciate their service! Reading a book like this is my small way of letting them know how mush I care!
Hugifyn
As an ex Marine myself having received my boot training at Parris Island about six years before the author, I had much in common with him. Except for Viet Nam. My service obligation was complete by the time things heated up there so I escaped that conflict - with my life. McLean's account of his days defending LZ Loon gave me a glimpse into what combat was like for a Marine rifleman during the Viet Nam conflict. I was fortunate to have been spared that experience or I might not be typing this review. The depiction of recruit training at Parris Island was spot on. I still have vivid memories of those three months almost 60 years later.
The book is a tribute to those thousands of Marines, and to those in all the services really, who gave their lives and limbs for a cause whose purpose seemed worthy at the outset but soon developed into a tar baby that dragged down all it touched. McLean got to witness it firsthand and presents it in a warm and personal story that touched my heart.
Simple
Excellent read! I am also a LZ Loon survivor. My brothers and I from Delta Company want to thank Jack McLean for taking the time and making the effort to write down the details of one of the most devastating battles in Vietnam. A battle, like so many others in the fierce bloody struggle against Communism that was completely forgotten, so I thought. The hardened disciplined NVA soldiers that hit us that day were well organized and very well led. Right before first light they stated firing, then rushed the perimeter with a solid wall of men seemingly drugged up and suicidal to die in the first wave. We shot every thing that moved then the second wave came on stoutly with even more determination firing brand new AK 47's on full auto. They also had Chi Com machine guns; the green tracers were so thick that our red ones would slam into them causing bullet lightning as they ricocheted. The sounds were deafening and the explosions left everyone deaf. In an hour of very heavy shooting we ran out of ammo and then the battle got personal with eyeball to eyeball killing. Meaning, close quarters combat where you have direct eye contact on the man trying to kill you and you him. I will never forget an unknown Marine to my left further down the hill using his entrenching tool as a weapon as the NVA swept through the lines engulfing him in their ranks. I still have dreams of him on occasions. Semper Fi brother, may you rest in peace.
Ballardana
There are two ways to write about war: use binoculars to watch what happens on the ground at a personal and tactical level, or invert the lens and view the conflict from a distance, at a macroscopic and strategic level. Loon is one of the former. A large number of similar works have been published lately, because the Vietnam vets are now of an age where they want to use reflection and sharing of their experiences to educate the rest of us and deal with their own residual demons. Jack McLean is a first rate writer. He takes the reader with him on his odyssey as a young man coming of age in a trying time, nearly losing his life in the process. He's forever changed. He isn't overtly political, but it's clear that the conduct of the war at the top of the chain of command disturbs and angers him. In all wars, the men who bear arms and sometimes die end up feeling loyalty to their brothers-in-arms, and they fight not so much for patriotism or an ideology as they do for each other. Mistakes happen at strategic and tactical levels, wasting lives in the process. We rationalize the losses, pointing out how a larger good must be served, and those who fall no doubt saved the lives of some of their comrades. Vietnam was the first TV war, bringing to the small screen a largely uncensored and ugly view of war. As a result, America's view of casualties grew narrow. That is a good thing on a moral basis, but not so good for prosecuting a war. During WW II there were numerous instances of command blunders in the field and behind the lines that cost thousands of lives. What would have been the reaction in the USA if network TV had shown the carnage that overwhelmed our troops in the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge? What if Walter Cronkite hadn't been a nervy correspondent reporting from our defeat at Operation Market Garden, and instead intoned from behind a desk in New York that the war was a stalemate and we should negotiate an end to it? We can't ever know the answer to those questions. In Vietnam, our leaders seriously miscalculated the tenacity of our enemy and refused to commit to a strategy of all out war. We were left with a strategy of attrition that sealed our fate.
Loon: A Marine Story download epub
Leaders & Notable People
Author: Jack McLean
ISBN: 034551016X
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Ballantine Books; 4/25/10 edition (May 25, 2010)
Pages: 256 pages