» » Theodore Roosevelt and World Order: Police Power in International Relations

Theodore Roosevelt and World Order: Police Power in International Relations download epub

by James R Holmes


Epub Book: 1529 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1650 kb.

Yet, as he convincingly argues, it has many parallels with the present and holds interesting lessons. Assesses both the theory and practice of international police work under Theodore Roosevelt; Offers valuable and timely lessons about America's past diplomatic and military interventions.

James R. Holmes book is not the quickest read, nor should it be expected to be in that category

Most know that Roosevelt served as New York police commissioner during the 1890s, warring on crime while sponsoring reforms that reflected his good-government convictions. Later Roosevelt became an accomplished diplomat. James R. Holmes book is not the quickest read, nor should it be expected to be in that category.

Roosevelt made his idea of international police power explicit in his 1904 annual message to Congress when he. .Citation: Julia Irwin.

Roosevelt made his idea of international police power explicit in his 1904 annual message to Congress when he declared his corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, but Holmes demonstrates that he had been conceptualizing the philosophy since the 1890s. Nevertheless, few historians-and indeed, few of Roosevelt's contemporaries-have engaged significantly with the doctrine.

Washington: Potomac Books, 2006. 327 pp. Introduction, illustrations, notes. Power and Responsibility: The Life and Times. Policing is not a stand alone activity but is affected by many different global changes and other social factors

Washington: Potomac Books, 2006. Velvet on Iron: The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt. Policing is not a stand alone activity but is affected by many different global changes and other social factors.

328 pp. Jones, Gregg (2012), Honor in the Dust: Theodore Roosevelt, War in the Philippines, and the Rise and Fall of America's Imperial Dream. Marks III, Frederick W (1979), Velvet on Iron: The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt. McCullough, David (1977), The Path between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870–1914.

Most know that Roosevelt served as New York police commissioner during the 1890s, warring on crime while sponsoring reforms that reflected his good-government convictions. Yet it has escaped attention that TR's perspectives on domestic and foreign affairs fused under the legal concept of "police power.

Yet it has escaped attention that TR’s perspectives on domestic and foreign affairs fused under the legal concept of police power. This gap in our understanding of Roosevelt’s career deserves to be filled. Holmes (author). Roosevelt exercised his concept of police power to manage the newly acquired Philippines and Cuba, to promote Panama's independence from Colombia, and to defuse international crises in Venezuela and Morocco. While not all of Roosevelt's philosophy is applicable to today's world, this book provides useful historical examples of international intervention and a powerful analytical tool for understanding how a great power should respond to world events.

book by James R. Holmes.

1 Beale, Howard . Theodore Koosevelt and the Rise of America to World Power (Baltimore, 1956); Collin, Richard . Theodore Roosevelt's Caribbean: The Panama Canal, the Monroe Doctrine, and the Latin American Context (Baton Rouge, 1990); Marks, Frederick III, Nelvet o. Theodore Roosevelt's Caribbean: The Panama Canal, the Monroe Doctrine, and the Latin American Context (Baton Rouge, 1990); Marks, Frederick III, Nelvet on Iron: The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt (Lincoln, NE, 1979). 2 Harbaugh, William Henry, Power and Responsibility: The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt (New York, 1961). Recommend this journal.

Theodore Roosevelt and World Order presents a new understanding of TR’s political philosophy while shedding light on some of today’s most vexing foreign policy dilemmas. Most know that Roosevelt served as New York police commissioner during the 1890s, warring on crime while sponsoring reforms that reflected his good-government convictions. Later Roosevelt became an accomplished diplomat. Yet it has escaped attention that TR’s perspectives on domestic and foreign affairs fused under the legal concept of “police power.”This gap in our understanding of Roosevelt’s career deserves to be filled. Why? TR is strikingly relevant to our own age. His era shares many features with that of the twenty-first century, notably growing economic interdependence, failed states unable or unwilling to discharge their sovereign responsibilities, and terrorism from an international anarchist movement that felled Roosevelt’s predecessor, William McKinley. Roosevelt exercised his concept of police power to manage the newly acquired Philippines and Cuba, to promote Panama’s independence from Colombia, and to defuse international crises in Venezuela and Morocco. Since the end of the Cold War, and especially in the post–9/11 era, American statesmen and academics have been grappling with the problem of how to buoy up world order. While not all of Roosevelt’s philosophy is applicable to today’s world, this book provides useful historical examples of international intervention and a powerful analytical tool for understanding how a great power should respond to world events.

Comments: (2)

Bragis
Holmes' book seems to provide an extensive amount of detail and through case studies communicates TR's philosophies. Holmes did a lot of research and shows it in his notes. The book lacks maps, which would have better explained the military settings, political borders, and much more. Had it not been for the lack of maps and other graphics I would give the book 5 stars.
Zyangup
If anyone took Rudyard Kipling seriously in assuming The White Man's Burden, it was T. R. and his belief in the "international police power" to bring "good government" to the benighted nations of the earth. His notions were thought long buried in the post-WW II One World of the United Nations. Yet since the demise of the cold war his philosophy has taken on new urgency.

The US has assumed the role of world policeman, because - as Teddy would have phrased it - "there is no one else capable of performing this service to humanity." The United Nations has been re-interpreted according to his reservations: not to "unacceptably abridge U.S. freedom to uphold its interests by unilateral action" (pp. 127-128).

Therein, of course, lies the fatal flaw of the Globo Cop: the inability to separate self-interest from enforcement of "good government" upon the reluctant. What his disciples Bush, Jr., Rice, and Rumsfeld encountered with Iraq, T.R. himself saw in Cuba and the Philippines. Teddy's experience as New York City police commissioner blinded him to the reality that defining and "apprehending" malfeasant nations is not the same as snatching a crook off the street. Though he was wise to the pitfall of conflict of interest on the local judicial bench, he seemed blinkered to its false steps in the larger world. Busting the trusts who violate the standards of "good government" at home did not appear to translate equally in defining an "open door" abroad, that let these same monopoly forces loose with US police power behind them to protect their sovereign property rights on other peoples' soil.

Fomenting insurgencies, establishing satellite states (ie, Panama) to further US interests, ordering armed intervention in the wars of others (China, Cuba): all the earmarks of modern US diplomacy can claim T. R.'s paternity. In more respects Teddy is the truer Father of His Country than George Washington ever was.
Theodore Roosevelt and World Order: Police Power in International Relations download epub
Leaders & Notable People
Author: James R Holmes
ISBN: 1574888846
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Potomac Books Inc. (March 15, 2007)
Pages: 336 pages