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The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty (Simon & Schuster America Collection) download epub

by William Hogeland


Epub Book: 1257 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1722 kb.

Series: Simon & Schuster America Collection .

Series: Simon & Schuster America Collection. This is a very good book for someone who has heard of the Whiskey Rebellion, but never really learned about it. The book starts off discussing the financial condition of the nation after the American Revolution (broke), then goes on to discuss Hamilton's plans to fund the nation and pay off war bonds by developing tax plan that hurts the poor, which in this case happened to hurt most those living in western PA. According to this book, anyway, the Whiskey Rebellion was not about taxes, but about Hamilton specifically taxing the poor to pay the rich.

The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty. by. William Hogeland. Alexander The Whiskey Rebellion, which came to a head in 1794 on the frontier of Western Pennsylvania, provides a great microcosm for viewing the early American republic. Read this book together with Thomas Slaughter's & Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution', and you should have everything you need to know about the Whiskey Rebellion short of doing a dissertation on it.

The Whiskey Rebellion by William Hogeland - A gripping . The Whiskey Rebellion.

The Whiskey Rebellion by William Hogeland - A gripping and sensational tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion uncovers the radical. George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty. A gripping and sensational tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion uncovers the radical eighteenth-century people’s movement, long ignored by historians, that contributed decisively to the establishment of federal authority.

Title: The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty By: William Hogeland Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 320 Vendor: Simon & Schuster Publication Date: 2010. Dimensions: . 4 X . 0 (inches) Weight: 10 ounces ISBN: 0743254910 ISBN-13: 9780743254915 Stock No: WW254912. Publisher's Description. With an unsparing look at both Hamilton and Washington, journalist and historian William Hogeland offers a provocative, in-depth analysis of this forgotten revolution and suppression.

Simon & Schuster America Collection. The Whiskey Rebellion is an important part of United States history, and the story has many parallels with events today. Simon & Schuster. irregularreader, March 27, 2017.

The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels who Challenged America’s Newfound Sovereignty. New York: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 2006. The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

A gripping and sensational tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion uncovers the radical eighteenth-century people’s movement, long ignored by historians, that contributed decisively to the establishment of federal authority. In 1791, on the frontier of western Pennsylvania, local gangs of insurgents with blackened faces began to attack federal officials, beating and torturing the tax collectors who attempted to collect the first federal tax ever laid on an American product-whiskey.

Challenged America’s Newfound Sovereignty - William Hogeland audio book torrent free download, 116457.

The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America’s Newfound Sovereignty - William Hogeland audio book torrent free download, 116457. A gripping and provocative tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion pits President George Washington and Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton against angry, armed settlers across the Appalachians. Unearthing a pungent segment of early American history long ignored by historians, William Hogeland brings to startling life the rebellion that decisively contributed to the establishment of federal authority.

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A gripping and sensational tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion uncovers the radical eighteenth-century people’s movement, long ignored by historians, that contributed decisively to the establishment of federal authority. In 1791, on the frontier of western Pennsylvania, local gangs of insurgents with blackened faces began to attack federal officials, beating and torturing the tax collectors who attempted to collect the first federal tax ever laid on an American product—whiskey. To the hard-bitten people of the depressed and violent West, the whiskey tax paralyzed their rural economies, putting money in the coffers of already wealthy creditors and industrialists. To Alexander Hamilton, the tax was the key to industrial growth. To President Washington, it was the catalyst for the first-ever deployment of a federal army, a military action that would suppress an insurgency against the American government. With an unsparing look at both Hamilton and Washington, journalist and historian William Hogeland offers a provocative, in-depth analysis of this forgotten revolution and suppression. Focusing on the battle between government and the early-American evangelical movement that advocated western secession, The Whiskey Rebellion is an intense and insightful examination of the roots of federal power and the most fundamental conflicts that ignited—and continue to smolder—in the United States.

Comments: (7)

Karg
Describes the civil insurrection in Western Pennsylvania against a Federal excise tax on distilled spirits imposed at the point of production. The brainchild of Alexander Hamilton was intended to raise domestic revenue to pay national debts from the war for independence. the tax aroused intense ire of small scale farmers and distillers who believed it constituted taxation without representation and discriminated against small scale Western interests. The insurrection featured multiple lines of conflict: across regions, economic classes, commercial interests, and debtor-creditor relations. hogeland chronicles the breakdown in society reminiscent of the border states before and after the civil war. Economic conflicts presage those of the Jacksonian and Populist eras of the 1830,s and 1890,s, respectively. Hogeland affirms the Madisonian caricature of Hamilton as an ambitious militarist who favored wealthy Eastern creditors over small scale farmers, and was willing to manipulate an aging George Washington to achieve his goals. The book is well researched and has an excellent annotated bibliography. Unfortunately, it lacks footnotes so it is impossible to check specific assertions against specific documents. I would recommend this book for anyone interested in the Federal period of American history or U.S. economic and class history. The breakdown in civil society in the Pittsburgh resembles Thucydides’ description of class conflicts in Greek city states.
Hamrl
Anyone interested in the founding of the United States should find this book engrossing. Thoroughly researched, well written and with deep insight into relatable people and the early years of the Republic, this work takes what history books typically dismiss as a minor uprising and explains how it might instead easily have become the undoing of the new United States and George Washington himself. Surprising elements include a self-appointed militia burning down the plantation of western Pennsylvania's most prominent slaveholder, how deeply the personal financial interests of George Washington himself were caught up in the Pittsburgh area and affected by the rebellion, and how that region and parts of Virginia agreed to form their own nation and created their own large army.
The non-fiction narrative flows smoothly and builds characters in a way that keeps you wanting to know what happens next. Fast and fascinating read.
fire dancer
The Whiskey Rebellion is a much overlooked episode in American history - sad since it is so important. William Hogeland does a wonderful job of telling the story and bringing to life all of the key players in this real life drama. But for my purposes the entire episode turns on Chapter 2 in which Hogeland puts the whiskey tax, against which the frontiersmen of the west rebelled, in the context of the Federalist scheme to establish a hierarchical society in the mold of Great Britain.

The Federalist position, embodied in the person of Alexander Hamilton, was one that believed in an elite ruling class, and the extent to which one did not yet exist in the young United States he was intent on creating one. The mechanisms by which Hamilton would create and empower this ruling class were largely financial, and so Robert Morris was recruited to establish a central bank and to help create and expand a wealthy class out of speculators in war debt. Every move the federalists made was one that benefited the rich at the expense of the poor. And as Hamilton moved to establish a strong federal government, the basis of it was to be the power of taxation. The authority to tax, as well as to print or "coin" money, was to move from the states to the central government. And federal taxation needed to become direct taxation levied by means of federal marshals instead of going through potentially uncooperative state governments.

The poor farmer bore the brunt of the American Revolution. The rank and file of the revolutionary army was small farmers whose farms suffered for their absences. If you were unlucky enough to have a farm in one of the counties that surrounded Philadelphia at the time of the Valley Forge encampment, then your harvest and anything else, tied down or not, was likely to be commandeered by Washington's army. If you received chits in exchange - IOUs to be paid after the war - these pieces of paper quickly devalued to the point of worthlessness. Speculators, often with inside information, bought them up for next to nothing. It was Hamilton's idea for the federal government to buy these and other war debt instruments back at face value in order to establish creditworthiness of the federal government. But part of the plan, too, was to establish a wealthy elite that could better manage the country's affairs than a true democracy of the people. So rather than default on the debt, made up of various bonds, chits, and continental currencies, paper that had largely gone worthless anyhow, Hamilton wanted to establish by legislative fiat that the emperor had clothes - that these scraps of paper now in the hands of speculators were worthy of the full faith and credit of the United States. But to honor this debt to the creditors, taxes must be imposed upon those same farmers and soldiers whose backs the war was won on.

So the excise tax on whiskey was essential to the Federalist plan to finance the government - financing that would have gone largely unnecessary had the decision been made to just let the paper debt continue on its course to valuelessness. Hogeland explains just how key whiskey was to the primitive economy that existed on the frontier - key to the point that it was used as local currency. And the fact that the way the law was written the tax burden on the small distilleries was heavier than on the larger ones. Once again, Hamilton demonstrated that his idea was to concentrate wealth into the hands of the few.

A large army was gathered to march westward with Washington at the lead, and the manner in which this campaign was conducted was most telling. The plan from the beginning to provision this army was to live off the land, so as the army marched westward it requisitioned provisions from the farms unlucky enough to be on the way. The stripping bare of farms that occurred during the 1776 rebellion was repeated during the putting down of this one. To an appalling extent the reader sees how the ends justified most horrible means. The callous attitudes towards those at the bottom rung of the social ladder bear tribute to the sense of rank and privilege the likes of Hamilton and Washington felt. The fathers of our country were anything but champions of the people.
Kerry
This is a very good book for someone who has heard of the Whiskey Rebellion, but never really learned about it. The book starts off discussing the financial condition of the nation after the American Revolution (broke), then goes on to discuss Hamilton's plans to fund the nation and pay off war bonds by developing tax plan that hurts the poor, which in this case happened to hurt most those living in western PA. According to this book, anyway, the Whiskey Rebellion was not about taxes, but about Hamilton specifically taxing the poor to pay the rich. Hamilton helped rich bankers buy up what at the time were worthless war bonds for pennies on the dollar, and then Hamilton got the US gov't to pay those bonds at full value by taxing the poor.

Although I had expected to read a book entirely about Washington leading troops into Pittsburgh, the book only devotes a few pages at the very end to Washington and the troops. The first 95% of the book is devoted to the events, over several years, leading up to Washington and the troops; but I must say this makes more sense and actually is more interesting to read.

Overall a very good book; fairly quick to read, no slow or boring chapters, and no over use of statistics like a lot of history authors do. Highly recommended!
The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty (Simon & Schuster America Collection) download epub
Leaders & Notable People
Author: William Hogeland
ISBN: 0743254910
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Later printing edition edition (June 1, 2010)
Pages: 320 pages