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The Nine Day's Queen: A Portrait of Lady Jane Grey download epub

by Mary Luke


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Leading a cabal, Dudley declared Henry's daughters Mary and Elizabeth bastards, thus usurping the throne

Leading a cabal, Dudley declared Henry's daughters Mary and Elizabeth bastards, thus usurping the throne. Because her mother was Henry's niece, Jane ascended in the royal lineage, and she accepted the crown as her parents' mistreatment had taught her to be submissive. After nine days, the public clamor for a rightful queen brought Mary forward to claim her inheritance, ending Jane's reign.

The nine-year-old Jane Grey was sent to the royal court as a ward of. .Jane is the only English monarch in the past 500 years for whom a definitive portrait does not exist.

The nine-year-old Jane Grey was sent to the royal court as a ward of Queen Catherine Parr. Considering Parr’s own great love of learning (and Protestant opinions), it’s not a stretch to assume her time there had some influence on Jane.

The Nine Days Queen book. Mrs. Luke wrote "Catherine, the Queen" (1967), a portrait of Henry VIII's hapless first wif Mary Luke was a biographer who wrote about Tudor and Elizabethan figures. Born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Mrs. Luke, whose original name was Mary Munger, graduated from Berkshire Business School and worked in advertising in New York, and later for a documentary film company and RKO Studios in Hollywood. Luke wrote "Catherine, the Queen" (1967), a portrait of Henry VIII's hapless first wife, Catherine of Aragon.

I was happy just to find anything on Jane Grey and so sucked up this nearly 400 pages of information on her life and the other players in this tragic dance.

As one of royal blood, Jane was in the royal line of succession. I was happy just to find anything on Jane Grey and so sucked up this nearly 400 pages of information on her life and the other players in this tragic dance. I learned things about the Suffolks, the Dudleys and even Elizabeth that I did not know before and that was wonderful. Perhaps some of my disappointment with the book was that history was not turning out the way I wanted it to, and that's hardly Mary Luke's fault.

Luke, Mary M. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Bibliographic Details. All books are guaranteed and may be returned for a full refund if not satisfied. Publisher: Morrow, New York. Publication Date: 1986. Chronicles the life of Lady Jane Grey, who, raised by power-hungry parents who forcibly married her at age sixteen to a boy who ascended the English throne, reigned for nine days as Queen of England until her execution. From Publishers Weekly: Luke (Catherine, the Queen, et. excels as a biographer who vivifies historical figures, particularly the manipulators of events during the Tudor monarchy.

An eminently readable, novelistic biography of Lady Jane Grey, a Tudor teen-ager who briefly ruled England, by pop historian and fictional biographer Luke (A Crown for Elizabeth, The Ivy Crown). Lady Jane's story could be a case study of the issues and intrigues that raged in England after Henry VIII's death. Henry had broken with the Pope to form the Anglican Church, and his son and successor, Edward VI, promoted ""the new religion"" during his brief reign.

a portrait of Lady Jane Grey. 1st ed. by Mary M. Luke. Published 1986 by W. Morrow in New York. Kings and rulers, In library, House of Tudor, Succession, History, Biography, Queens. Jane Grey Lady (1537-1554). Bibliography: p. 417-420.

Chronicles the life of Lady Jane Grey, who, raised by power-hungry parents who forcibly married her at age sixteen to a boy who ascended the English throne, reigned for nine days as Queen of England until her execution

Comments: (7)

GWEZJ
This book, which purports to be nonfiction, is a heavily fictionalized book about Lady Jane Grey. It's essentially a novel, and should have been published as one.

It's common for biographers to speculate as to what their subjects might have felt; Luke, however, takes this a step further and tells us exactly what her historical figures were thinking, even when she has no way of knowing. This starts at the very beginning of the book, when we meet Jane's mother, Frances, on her wedding day and are told, "And now, at this moment of triumph, she was elated at how well everything had worked out."

This would be irritating, but relatively harmless, if Luke confined herself to guessing what brides felt on their wedding day or what mothers felt when their children died. Unfortunately, Luke goes well beyond that, especially with Frances, who is the clear villain of this biography, and simply invents incidents that have no basis in recorded fact. Though the worst thing Jane ever accused her parents of doing (if the words attributed to her long after her death were reported accurately) was giving her "pinches, nips, and bobs," here Frances is depicted as shaking her infant children: "Baby Katherine was almost asleep . . . Her mother didn't like any child to cry, and often, if she was around, she'd shake little Katherine to make her stop. Jane could remember her mother shaking her too, and that had been very frightening, for she hadn't even been crying." Not content with this, Luke goes on to invent other episodes of Frances physically abusing Jane: "Chattering on one day about a pleasant occasion with the Queen Dowager and Lord Admiral, [Jane] was shocked when, suddenly and unexpectedly, her mother silenced her with a swift blow to the side of her head." These episodes, like many others in the book, are entirely the product of Luke's lurid imagination.

Luke even goes so far as to describe the events of Jane's wedding night with Guildford: "The marriage bed had proven a shock; nothing had prepared her for the assault on her senses, much less her body." How did Luke become privy to the secrets of Jane's marital bed?

It would take pages to list all of the historical liberties Luke takes here, in a book which she firmly declares "is not a novel, not a fictional biography." It may not be either of these things, but it's not a reliable work of nonfiction either. Quite simply, it's a fraud on the reader and, frequently, an exercise in character assassination. Read it as a novel if you must read it at all.

If you want well-researched nonfiction about Jane Grey backed up by verifiable sources, try The Sisters Who Would Be Queen: Mary, Katherine, and Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Tragedy or Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Mystery (Tudor Mysteries)
Lcena
As with all Ms Luke's books, I found this to be very informative and an easy read. Gave a lot of background and family connections that are often overlooked when looking at the Tudor period.
Qulcelat
Very good. This moved me to tears the first time I read it as a library book. I am very glad to have it as my own now.
Tam
I was happy just to find anything on Jane Grey and so sucked up this nearly 400 pages of information on her life and the other players in this tragic dance. I learned things about the Suffolks, the Dudleys and even Elizabeth that I did not know before and that was wonderful. Perhaps some of my disappointment with the book was that history was not turning out the way I wanted it to, and that's hardly Mary Luke's fault. Poisened by Trevor Nunn's erroneous romantic depiction of the relationship between Jane Grey and Guildford Dudley, I am forever searching for some smidgen of proof that this was true; that the tall dashing Dudley boy and the petite scholarly Jane really did become soul mates sharing love and idealism against a backdrop of religious and political chaos. Mary Luke's book did not give me the confirmation I long to find. I just can't imagine why, if there was no foundatin for it at all, the the creators of the film Lady Jane focused so much on a romance that never existed. But to return to the book. As can be seen from the list on this subject available here, books on Jane Grey are nearly impossible to find--I had to reserve my copy of The Nine Days Queen from the library--and so I was greatful to find it. I think the book needed additionl editing--grammar errors, some very awkward sentence sructure and a lack of organization within paragraphs. However, it offered up lots of facts, a feast for someone like me who can't ever eat enough from the Medieval/Renaissance table. And so I found it very interesting and informative, if not satisfying. As it is non fiction, it can get rather dry in spots and is not for those who are not already fascinated by these people and this time period. One last note, if you, who may be reading this, have knowledge of any ifnormation or sources on Jane Grey, please help me in my frustrating search.
Braned
Mary M. Luke's basic facts are correct, and personally I enjoyed the book. But unfortunately I feel she had to resort to some novelizing as she couldn't possibly know what was going on inside Jane's head in between her daily lessons, other people's letters to and about her, and her own letter writing. She also wasn't there to personally observe Jane's interactions with others or question her about them, always a dilemma for historians and historical fiction writers. Ms. Luke's writing style is clear and fluid; she's excellent at creating mental images with her words, so you have no problem following her narrative. However, I feel that in this case this book should have been a historical novel instead of an attempt at non-fiction. She would have then been forgiven for whatever embellishments or speculations she had to come up with to fill out the book and hold her readers' interest.
The Nine Day's Queen: A Portrait of Lady Jane Grey download epub
Leaders & Notable People
Author: Mary Luke
ISBN: 0688057713
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: William Morrow & Co; Reprint edition (June 1986)
Pages: 432 pages