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The Scientists: A Family Romance download epub

by Marco Roth


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James Lasdun on Marco Roth's elite, bookish upbringing, tainted by a dangerous secret. His father was a scientist, his mother a musician

James Lasdun on Marco Roth's elite, bookish upbringing, tainted by a dangerous secret. His father was a scientist, his mother a musician. They lived in a book-filled home on New York's Upper West Side, where Marco, aged eight, lolled on the carpet reading Shakespeare: "I was the definition of 'precocious'. An ancestor had founded Van Heusen shirts, and there was evidently no shortage of money.

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The Scientists: A Family Romance Hardcover – September 18, 2012. by. Marco Roth (Author). Marco Roth emerged from his privileged New York City childhood like one of Salinger's precocious Glass children, but Roth's family was ravaged by secrets, and from this history he has written a gorgeous memoir no one will be able to put down: psychologically adroit, precise, moving-one of the best memoirs I've read in years.

The Scientists is a story of how we first learn from our parents and how we then learn to see them as separate .

The Scientists is a story of how we first learn from our parents and how we then learn to see them as separate individuals; it's a story of how growing up quickly can slow us down when it comes to knowing about our desires and other people's. Marco Roth emerged from his privileged NYC childhood like one of Salinger's precocious Glass children, but Roth's family was ravaged by secrets, and from it he has written a gorgeous memoir no one will be able to put adroit, precise, moving, one of the best memoirs I've read in years. Mary Karr, New York Times bestselling.

The Scientists is at its best not in the discursive book reports that take up part of its last third, but when its tunnel vision locks onto timeless-seeming memories . 196 pp. Farrar, Straus & Giroux.

The Scientists is at its best not in the discursive book reports that take up part of its last third, but when its tunnel vision locks onto timeless-seeming memories: Roth as a child, lying under his mother’s Steinway B while she played Scarlatti and Schubert, as cadences and phrases flowed and mingled somehow with the patterns of the carpets.

The Scientists - Marco Roth. Recommended for those who like Fun Home, Fairyland, those who love or hate academia, the humanities, literary criticism, and philosophy, and New York City.

The Scientists: A Family Romance. MARCO ROTH cannot quite recall how his father told him he was dying of AIDS. The virus would be the family’s secret. Get our daily newsletter. What this family could not talk about for years came to dominate the lives of its surviving members, often in unexpected ways

The Scientists: A Family Romance. What this family could not talk about for years came to dominate the lives of its surviving members, often in unexpected ways. The Scientists is a story of how we first learn from our parents and how we then learn to see them as separate individuals; it's a story of how precociousness can slow us down when it comes to knowing about our desires and other people's.

Roth develops this thought in his memoir, The Scientists, his first book.

By Jonathan Derbyshire. The Scientists: a Family Romance Marco Roth Union Books, 208pp, £1. 9. Roth develops this thought in his memoir, The Scientists, his first book.

'Marco Roth's book about his father is a farewell to a bygone culture - polygot, intellectual, Europhile, psychoanalytic - and simultaneously a renewal of that culture. It's moving, tough-minded, and distinctive, a memoir the likes of which nobody else could write.' Benjamin Kunkel, author of Indecision With the precociousness expected of the only child of a doctor and a classical musician - from the time he could get his toddler tongue to pronounce a word like 'deoxyribonucleic acid' or recite a French poem - Marco Roth was able to share his parents' New York, a world centered around house concerts, a private library of literary classics, and dinner discussions of the latest advances in medicine. That world ended when his father began to suffer the worst effects of the AIDS virus that had infected him in the early 1980s. What this family would not talk about for years came to dominate the lives of its surviving members, often in unexpected ways. The Scientists is a story of how we first learn from our parents and how we then learn to see them as separate individuals; it's a story of how preciousness can slow us down when it comes to understanding our desires and other people's. A memoir of parents and children in the tradition of Edmund Gosse, Henry Adams and J. R. Ackerley, The Scientists grapples with a troubled and emotional inheritance, in a style that is both elegiac and defiant.

Comments: (7)

Qiahmagha
This is an extremely powerful, haunting first work. It steers clear of the many temptations and false consolations of the memoir: to make linear and precise what in memory is always twisted and vague; to take one's own reconstructed account for the truth; and to slip into that false religion which holds that to articulate one's own life, say "one's own truth," somehow redeems that life. Though written by a literary critic with an extremely literary sensibility, The Scientists is highly scientific in method: Every conclusion is tentative and subject to revision, and it never allows a hypothesis to pass without challenging it with inconvenient facts. We close the book with no single working theory that accounts for why Marco Roth is who he is, why his father was who he was, and why his mother stood by. Instead, we come to share Roth's many struggles, over many years, to come to answer these questions, to puzzle out, in the shadow of his father's ghost, his own failings and fortunes. For a man as sensitive and introspective as Roth, these struggles to read one's own life again and again *are* life.

Yes, Roth grew up in a rarefied corner of New York City Jewish society, affluent and well educated. More than that, he was a particularly effete flower of that world -- raised speaking French, playing violin and reading Shakespeare before he read comic books -- and, as he tells us, he often suffered socially as a result. But there is nothing precious or pretentious about his writing here, or about the person who comes through. He is tough-minded and forthright -- which is the very best you can ask of a memoirist.

This is a must-read. You won't forget it.
Yozshunris
Marco Roth has written a memoir of his life as a son of parents living their own lives in a sort of denial of the truth. The "truth" was his father's death from AIDS in the mid-1990's and the lies and half-truths handed down through the generations of Eugene Roth's family.

Eugene Roth was the brother of writer Anne Roth Roiphe and the uncle of writer Katie Roiphe. Their parents raised their children in a household of denial. Their father was a philanderer with a second family, financed by the wealth of their mother. Anne Roiphe writes about her life in the book, "1185 Park Avenue". She also hints at her brother, Eugene's, sexuality in the memoir, published soon after Eugene Roth's death. Marco, the son who watched his father die in their apartment and had been forbidden to tell others of his father's illness, was left with more half-truths. His father had told Marco that he had contracted AIDS due to an inadvertent slip in his medical practice. Viki Roth, Marco's mother kept up this explanation after Eugene's death. It took Anne Roiphe's memoir to begin Marco's questioning of his parents' lives.

What is the purpose of writing a memoir. Telling the truth? Getting back at those who have caused the author pain? Righting a wrong (perceived or real)? I think people write memoirs for almost as many reasons are there are memoirs. Marco Roth's memoir examines the secrecy that transcended the generations of his family. He writes how the family dynamics affected his life, way past his father's death. He uses his memoir as a way to figure out his life. I suppose that's a good reason to write a memoir. Roth's memoir is worth reading, particularly if the reader knows about the Roth/Roiphe connection.
Kirimath
Well written but an unsympathetic character.
Steamy Ibis
Heard interview on NPR with author and promptly purchased several weeks in advance of release- (job well done NPR) but really enjoyed interview far more than book. My Heart aches for HIV victims and loved ones in the 80s and 90s, and this story offers a painful glimpse into one such story- but overall the book did not meet my expectations.
Shem
Not much about scientists or family romance, but a coming-of-age-under-difficult-circumstances novel. Due, in part, to having a tell-all writer (Anne Roiphe) as an aunt. In this case, the difficult circumstance is a father dying of AIDS and a son's coping with the loss and a search for truth about the origins of his father's illness. The deviation into the author's pursuit of deconstructionism is interesting, but distracting.
Rigiot
I bought this because of the positive review it got in The Economist, but having read the book I think the magazine paid it far more praise than it deserved.
While there were passages that were well done, on the whole I found the book amateurishly written and executed, and the tone whiny and self-indulgent. I believe this book made it to publication only because of the author's family connection to the writers Anne Roiphe and Katie Roiphe (his aunt and cousin, respectively). The editors responsible for this book should be sacked. There are so many more deserving writers out there with more interesting material.
Rarranere
the book is very-well written, so it was enjoyable to read it. for me, it also openned a window of the life of upper-middle-class as well as scientists, who i ever wanted to be one. i would say the way it was written was spiritral, deep, and blur, so it should be good for someone who wants to do self-inspection, reading it at a quiet sunny afternoon.
Well written about growing up in the a New York family stricken by a private disaster. The book also offer interesting literary references. Great book for those lonely souls seeking the meaning of their existence.
The Scientists: A Family Romance download epub
Memoirs
Author: Marco Roth
ISBN: 190852619X
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Memoirs
Language: English
Publisher: Union Books (January 17, 2013)
Pages: 208 pages