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Groping Toward Whatever or How I Learned to Retire, Sort of download epub

by Susan R. Trausch


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Susan Trausch is one of the funniest writers in America. This book makes a great gift for anyone who has retired or is close to retirement, and it is a wonderful read for anyone else who simply can laugh about growing older. 5 people found this helpful.

She wrote a delightful memoir called Groping Toward Whatever or How I Learned to Retire. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически. Susan Trausch Social Networks Profiles.

I recently phoned Susan Trausch, a former co-worker who retired in 2005

I recently phoned Susan Trausch, a former co-worker who retired in 2005. There are thousands of people like her. What makes her different is that, as a journalist, she decided to take notes on what happened when she retired. In a funny and touching little book ( Groping Toward Whatever, or How I Learned to Retire, (Sort of) ), she describes how dealing with identity can be the biggest challenge. Like many people who no longer carry business cards, she struggled with the so what do you do? question at dinner parties. She found herself starting projects and dropping them.

Publisher of GROPING TOWARD WHATEVER or How I Learned to Retire .

Publisher of GROPING TOWARD WHATEVER or How I Learned to Retire (sort of). Home. Groping Toward Whatever. About Free Street Press. Former Boston Globe reporter Susan Trausch is retired but not sure what that means. She doesn’t have to go to the office anymore and that’s good. But there is no quick answer to the question What do you DO? and that’s bad. Groping Toward Whatever – or How I Learned to Retire (Sort Of) is a tale of transition, a journey from the job to somewhere else. It’s about confusion, aging, joy, and love. It’s about disorienting change and the serenity found in what remains constant.

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But, as Susan Cain argues in this passionate talk, introverts bring extraordinary talents and .

But, as Susan Cain argues in this passionate talk, introverts bring extraordinary talents and abilities to the world, and should be encouraged and celebrated. And my mother packed me a suitcase full of books, which to me seemed like a perfectly natural thing to do. Because in my family, reading was the primary group activity. And this might sound antisocial to you, but for us it was really just a different way of being social. Whatever it is, I hope you take these things out every chance you get and grace us with your energy and your joy. But introverts, you being you, you probably have the impulse to guard very carefully what's inside your own suitcase.

Susan probably made it back to Narnia, because her experience with faith . You must learn to know me by that name

Susan probably made it back to Narnia, because her experience with faith reflects that of Lewis himself. In 1960, C. S. Lewis wrote back to a reader and said that Susan is not in Aslan's country. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there. We can't definitively answer from the books whether Susan ever did that, but the books do at least hint at the possibility that Susan would grow out of the "phase" she was in. TL;DR The fact that Susan wasn't there in The Last Battle doesn't necessarily mean that she wouldn't be in the future.

Susan Trausch is "retired" but not quite sure what that means. She doesn't have to go to the office anymore and that's good. But there is no quick answer to the question, "What do you DO?" and that's bad. After a career at the Boston Globe she is off the clock and glad -- except when she blows a morning messing with dryer lint, except when the confidence evaporates and she forgets to laugh. This is a tale of transition, a journey from job to somewhere else. It's about confusion, aging, joy, and love. It's about disorienting change and the serenity found in what remains constant.

Comments: (7)

Uttegirazu
Hilarious & poignant! A realistic account of the process and tribulations one goes through once they find themselves free of the work-a-day world. So much of what the author went through resonates with my own experience. It is a humorous, yet accurate anecdotal record of the generational divide that exists between younger staff members and those who have arrived at the end of their career. Great imagery! Clever writing! Most enjoyable!
ndup
Susan Trausch is one of the funniest writers in America. Before her own retirement, she even managed to make editorials in the Boston Globe fun to read! Groping Toward Whatever is not a how-to book about retirement, but rather a collection of light-hearted and often poignant observations about the good, the bad, the ugly, and most definitely the funny of the aging process. This book makes a great gift for anyone who has retired or is close to retirement, and it is a wonderful read for anyone else who simply can laugh about growing older.
Vispel
She is a good writer and her essays cover a range of experiences and emotions of the sudden change into retirement.
Ttyr
After being retired for 18 months, I landed a job with the US Census...what a life saver! I worked long and hard for six glorious months before the job ended. There is nothing like having a place to go and a job to do. Susan Trausch really gets it. She describes the emptiness of being all dressed up with nowhere to go, the long days of tortured "freedom" from purposeful work, the gradual loss of identity, the painful attempts at "decluttering" around the house, and the (very)occasional bright days and happy times. She refrains from giving advice and just shares her feelings openly about the awkward lunches with former colleagues, the pain of the "what do you do?" question at dinner parties, and the effort to create meaning in one's life when there appears to be none. Each of the essays in this book stand alone, and can be read in any order, but they all share the theme of a soul in transition, and talk not of the mystical but the mundane. You will relate, whatever your (former) station in life. I loved the feeling that I am not alone in my confusion at "retiring" from a job, but not wanting to retire from Life! Many of her essays involve such intensely personal things that I feel like I have spent time talking with a close friend.

The author also mentions the irrascible Don Murray, her friend and colleague at the Globe and writing guru at the University of New Hampshire who is a legend among aspiring writers. His Boston Globe column "Over Sixty" had fans of all ages and was as close to wisdom as one can get for the price of a broadsheet. Aspiring writers owe it to themselves to become familiar with Don's work and The Essential Don Murray: Lessons from America's Greatest Writing Teacher

Read this book! Perhaps give a copy to friend or spouse who is struggling with these issues. The author gives no advice (Hooray - Got plenty of that!) she just writes about the way it is. It won't solve your problems, but it will at least let you know that you are not alone...and that is worth so much! Especially recommended for new retirees who are suddenly given a "package", and those actively considering retirement (be careful what you wish for!).
Arihelm
Susan Trausch has written a funny and insightful book on her transition from fulltime newswoman to retiree. For anyone who thinks retirement will be one long endless series of lunches and golf games, this provides a cautionary tale on what happens when you suddenly feel you lost your identity and purpose with the fulltime job. In the end, Susan shows that being in the moment, caring for others and living life to the fullest is what makes for true happiness. Buy several copies. You will want to give this one to your friends.
Meztihn
Although this is a book about adjusting to retirement, it is totally accessible to everyone, even us thirty somethings. I love the way the author tackles everything from mismanaging time, to pursuing hobbies, to fine tuning personal relationships in such a humorous way. I actually laughed out loud at some places and then found myself thinking, hey I do that, or I should do that in others. I would recommend this book for anybody, but it would make a great gift for anyone of retirement age or older that you may have on your holiday list.
Akisame
She's Back! Susan Trausch has come out of hiding to wipe the frowns -- and maybe a few wrinkles, too -- off our "Golden Age" faces. The humor mistress of The Boston Globe recounts her tribulations in adjusting to retirement in page after page -- no, in paragraph after paragraph -- of laughs. As readers will discover, she has lost none of her magic. She is not just a joy, though, she's a philosopher. Read, smile and think.
I burst into laughter many times while reading this book. Not only is it hilarious, such as when the author writes of grocery shopping, looking at over 55 communities, and receiving a birthday text message, Susan also shows incredible sensitivity as she sorts through old photos of family and friends and checks in with other retired Globe employees. Reminded me a lot of Jean Kerr, and yes, Erma Bomback. Retired or not, get it--you won't regret it.
Groping Toward Whatever or How I Learned to Retire, Sort of download epub
Memoirs
Author: Susan R. Trausch
ISBN: 0982813694
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Memoirs
Language: English
Publisher: Free Street Press (October 1, 2010)
Pages: 202 pages