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A Girl Named Maria: The Story of an Adoption download epub

by Valerie S. Kreutzer


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A Girl Named Maria book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. A Girl Named Maria: The Story of an Adoption. by. Valerie S. Kreutzer.

She was found abandoned in the lavatory of a cafeteria in Bogota, Colombia. The police who picked her up named her Maria Consuelo. From a stack of would-be parents, Colombia's welfare agency chose Valerie Kreutzer's application, and the toddler quickly bonded with her new mom in Washington, DC. At school Maria struggled with severe learning disabilities despite a superior . but also blossomed into an award-winning young artist.

This gripping story chronicles an adoption journey that began in Colombia, South America, and ended twenty years later with a tragic death in Florida. The story begins with a toddler's abandonment in the lavatory of a downtown cafeteria in Bogota. The police who pick her up name her Maria Consuelo

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This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. A Girl Named Maria : The Story of an Adoption. Walmart 9780595497058.

A Girl Named Maria: The Story of an Adoption. Healing at the Harbor. This is a story about a bear, a very special bear. He is short and round with long arms and tiny ears and irresistible dark brown eyes. The Gift of Adoption: A Journey to parenthood. Adoption Joys: They Expected a Miracle. Baylard isn't like any other bear you've seen or read about before.

Here’s an adoption story that started at Saks Fifth Avenue. When they got the call for Olivia, they never expected her to be anything more than another child they fostered. Olivia had been placed in foster care when she was four, and experienced being moved to five different homes within seven years. These kids are not in foster care because they had great parents, Robb says.

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In 2010, Michael and Kristin Barnett adopted an eight-year-old girl from Ukraine, suffering from congenital spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia - a violation of bone development that causes dwarfism. She arrived in the USA in 2008 and at first lived in another family, which later abandoned her. The age of the adopted daughter from the very beginning aroused doubts among the Barnetts. In June 2010 of the year, they showed her to the doctor, who confirmed that the girl was eight years old. In 2012, she underwent a new inspection.

She believes this is how stories are made. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created – 23 September 2010. Made by S. Product/service.

Create comics and graphic novels that jump off the screen. Experiment with DeviantArt’s own digital drawing tools. Valerie's Adoption! Sep 3, 2018.

She was found abandoned in the lavatory of a cafeteria in Bogota, Colombia. The police who picked her up named her Maria Consuelo. From a stack of would-be parents, Colombia's welfare agency chose Valerie Kreutzer's application, and the toddler quickly bonded with her new mom in Washington, DC. At school Maria struggled with severe learning disabilities despite a superior I.Q., but also blossomed into an award-winning young artist. Her impulsive behavior led to fits and false starts during adolescence, until she found happiness at twenty-one with David and his extended family. Their love and lives ended in the curve of a rural road in Florida.A Girl Named Maria chronicles an adopted daughter's struggle with identity and her yearning for a birth family that may have included a twin brother.Maria's legacy lives on in this poignant personal story of one mother's unconditional love for her adopted daughter."I loved this book! This story, although carrying the deep sorrow of a daughter's death, will give parents of transnational adoptions a guideline for their own experience. This book is a much needed addition to the adoption literature." Nancy Verrier, The Primal Wound; Coming Home to Self www.nancyverrier.com

Comments: (7)

Hulis
Book arrived quickly from the seller, and in good condition. This true story was mind boggling for me as I adopted a son from Bogota, Columbia, while living on the East coast. He is also learning disabled and in many ways resembles Maria. I would recommend this very well written and suspensful story to others who have experienced a troubled adoption.
Hugighma
"A Girl Named Maria" is - specifically - the story of a German-American woman who adopts a child from Colombia, South America (two very distinct and different national personalities!), but its appeal is so much broader than that. It is a tale of the ups and downs of parenting that anyone who has ever had a teenager will identify with. It is a look at two formidable personalities - mother and daughter - facing off against each other one moment, loving another moment. Told with both humor and sadness, this book is both emotion-provoking and engrossing.
Fek
It really hit home as I struggle with some of the same heartbreak the author goes through in this very real depiction of being a Forever mother. I saw myself in her words, and for the first time, I learned I was not alone.
Ballardana
Even though I knew how it ended, I could not put this well-written memoir down. The author was a single woman with a full and fascinating life and career when she adopted a young Columbian child. She never imagined the challenges she would face raising this gifted, learning-disabled, oppositional-defiant young woman. I marveled at the author's strength and determination, and despaired at her suffering. This book is inspiring, and is especially relevant for anyone who has known, loved, or parented an extremely challenging child, whether adopted or not. Love may not conquer all, but in the end, it's what matters.
Bragis
On one level, Valerie Kreutzer's remarkable book, "A Girl Named Maria," is about her trials and tribulations in raising her adopted daughter, Maria. Tragically, Maria died in an automobile accident while still coming to grips with her young adulthood and before mother and child had had a chance to fully work out their differences. One gets the sense that had fate not intervened -- given time -- they might have. But whatever opportunity there was died in in instant on a lonely Florida highway.

On another level, however, Kreutzer's book is more universal -- the story of two human beings trying to relate as best they could despite differences of temperament, culture, and attitude toward life -- all complicated by the juxtaposition of the roles of parent and child. What comes through more than anything I think -- because of Kreutzer's effortless, lucid writing -- is a profile of two, strong-willed people who are frequently at odds, but who nevertheless love each other. The story is richly drawn and -- this might seem odd to say for a book such as this -- gripping from one page to the next. What will happen next I wondered in this stormy saga of mother and daughter?

The book is unsparing in its portrayal of the complexities faced in the raising of Maria. Kreutzer adopted her as an infant while on a visit to Latin America. It was not an easy childhood from the beginning and the difficulties increased as Maria slowly became aware of her origins. This seems to have complicated, in Maria's case, the inevitable search for her own identity that all children seek -- particularly during her teenage years. She was still in the process of discovery, it seems, when time ran out. Her mother was left to cope with the overpowering grief -- and perhaps guilt -- that all parents who lose a child must endure. This stunningly intelligent book is her attempt to make sense of it all -- and to cope with the daily ache of loss.
Alexandra
I am actually reviewing this book before being able to read it. I just ordered it online. I was at chelsea school when Maria was there and road that same school bus with her. I had not heard about her death until a year ago. I have been out of the loop since I do not live in the washington area anymore. I have met her mother a few times as well by chance but just remember how wonderful it was too have her as a classmate. I remembered that she would draw pictures everyday and also helped paint a mural on the wall of the school. She was also talented at making people smile and was very energetic and positive. I am sure there will be a lot of information in this book but it will never make up for knowing Maria in person. I feel lucky to have known Maria the person, friend and classmate. She was a remarkable person and I share my deepest condolencses with her mother.
Nikohn
As the father of an adopted son, I found Valerie Kreutzer's memoir both a gripping personal account and an immensely helpful resource in understanding the twists and turns of the adoption journey. Even birth parents in traditional families sometimes express the wish that their baby had come with a map or a set of instructions. Adoptive parents get an extra dollop of puzzlement and more than a few extra challenges. "A Girl Named Maria" will provide valuable insights to anyone who has embarked upon this journey, either as adoptive parent or as adoptee. Ms. Kreutzer's honest and moving account is suffused with grace and humor. In her struggle to understand her daughter's complex needs, tensions, and feelings, she finds hope and meaning without ever losing hold of the stark realism of Maria's circumstances and the blunt fact of her untimely death. This poignant story will be a welcome and valued addition to the literature of adoption.
This story is a unique account of adopting and raising a bright yet troubled daughter. The mother (who herself was a child in Berlin during World War II), adopts the young girl from Columbia. This honest account is moving, funny, tragic, and gives a window into the adoption process: its twists and turns, its up and downs, its triumphs and challenges. By the end you feel as if you have grown up with the family and have experienced the mother's enduring love, the sorrow at the tragic loss of her child, as well as the child's very real struggle with her identity. In all, it is a must-read for families who have adopted a child or who have a child with a learning disability; it will also be inspirational to single parents.
A Girl Named Maria: The Story of an Adoption download epub
Memoirs
Author: Valerie S. Kreutzer
ISBN: 0595497055
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Memoirs
Language: English
Publisher: iUniverse (December 23, 2008)
Pages: 196 pages