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Music by Philip Glass download epub

by Philip Glass


Epub Book: 1290 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1168 kb.

NOTES: In 1975 Philip Glass’s music was largely ignored by the more traditional, contemporary classical music world. He had no record contract and was unable to perform outside art galleries and performance spaces.

NOTES: In 1975 Philip Glass’s music was largely ignored by the more traditional, contemporary classical music world. As a result, Philip Glass has emerged as today’s most significant and innovative American composer.

Music by Philip Glass is called the composer's "professional autobiography" in the dust jacket. Although correct, this statement is slightly misleading because in this book Glass writes primarily about his career in theater production and less about his career as a composer of music. As someone who is very interested in music but has almost no exposure to live theater, I find the theater emphasis to be detrimental to my enjoyment of the book.

Words without Music (A Memoir by Philip Glass). Flutist James Strauss and Camerata Simon Bolivar's new album of Glass works including The Orphée Suite and an arrangement of Violin Concerto N. NEW RELEASE: VENEZUELAN ELEGY from OMM.

Лучшие композиции – Филип Гласс. Philip Glass - Pruit Igoe (new version). Philip Glass: Music with Changing Parts.

The following is a list of compositions by Philip Glass. How Now for ensemble (also for piano, 1968). Music in Fifths (1969). Music in Similar Motion (1969). Music with Changing Parts (1970, recorded 1973)

The following is a list of compositions by Philip Glass. Music with Changing Parts (1970, recorded 1973). Music in Twelve Parts (1971–1974). Another Look at Harmony, Parts I and II (1975). Dance (Dance 1, 3 and 5, 1979, with Lucinda Childs and Sol LeWitt). A Descent Into the Maelstrom (based on the short story by Edgar Allan Poe, 1986).

Philip Glass - Paroles Sans Musique Français Cité de la Musique. quatre-vingts ans, Philip Glass est considéré comme l?un des compositeurs contemporains les plus influents. Dans ce récit de vie à la première personne, les lieux marquent les souvenirs et font émerger des sonorités.

The Illusionist (From the Philip Glass Recording Archive, Vo. Philip Glass: The Concerto Project, Vol. I. Evelyn Glennie, Gerard Schwarz, Jonathan Haas, Julian Lloyd Webber & Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

The Illusionist (From the Philip Glass Recording Archive, Vol. VII). Philip Glass: Symphony No. 9. 2012.

Music by Philip Glass.

Comments: (3)

Delari
Music by Philip Glass is called the composer's "professional autobiography" in the dust jacket. Although correct, this statement is slightly misleading because in this book Glass writes primarily about his career in theater production and less about his career as a composer of music. As someone who is very interested in music but has almost no exposure to live theater, I find the theater emphasis to be detrimental to my enjoyment of the book. However, what Glass does write about he discusses in a highly interesting way, and he does write enough about his music to keep me interested.

The book begins with Glass's early career in the mid-1960s with he and his then-wife JoAnne Akalaitis in Paris and New York attending various works of theater and involving themselves in local art scenes. Akalaitis can be used as a representative example in this book in how Glass says much about Akalaitis from a professional perspective but virtually nothing about their marriage. Likewise Glass spends much of the book naming and praising professional colleagues but says next to nothing about his personal life or his personal relationships with any of these people outside the bounds of producing music and theater. In this first chapter he writes briefly about his earliest performed musical works, the formation of the Philip Glass Ensemble, and music he wrote for the Ensemble from "Two Pages" through "Music in 12 Parts". This first chapter, which covers about 10 years, provides enough musical information to make one interested but not enough to answer very many questions, and the only time Glass as a person is revealed is when he admitted that he worked as a taxi driver and a maintenance man to pay the bills even when he was a somewhat accomplished and well-known composer. I found it highly interesting that although Glass briefly discusses the pre-Ensemble period in which he played with fellow minimalist composer Steve Reich, Glass never once mentioned Reich in the book. It is well-known that the two had a falling-out, but it would have been nice to read a sentence or two about it from Glass's perspective.

Then we get to the core of the book: Glass's detailed discussions about his so-called "Portrait Trilogy" of operas, namely, Einstein on the Beach, Satagraha, and Akhnaten. The book devoted three chapters to each opera. The first chapter for each opera is the lengthiest, in which he spends a good many pages talking about how the opera was originally conceived, people he worked with, stage design, theater production, and live performances. The most interesting part of these sections is where Glass discusses the historical individual that particular opera is about: Einstein, Ghandi, and the Pharoah Akhnaten respectively. It is quite enlightening to see each historical figure through the composer's eyes.

The second chapter for each opera is about the music itself, and it is these three music chapters which I found the most interesting. Glass includes musical examples written in his own hand and discusses the additive process he uses, various problems he tried to overcome, instrumentation, and so on. As a musician I found a lot here to get my creativity flowing, and I received new ideas for composing my own music. Unfortunately the few examples given are no substitute for a complete score. I would absolutely love to see scores for portions of Einstein on the Beach, as well as Two Pages, Music in 12 Parts, Glassworks, and Descent Into the Maelstrom. The third chapter for each opera is the complete libretto for that particular opera, something that would be of great interest to a fan of theater but was of almost no interest to me.

The final chapter briefly discusses many of the other musical projects Glass was involved in up to the writing of the book in the late 80s. He talks about several opera collaborations including the CIVIL warS and recording studio albums such as Glassworks. His discussion of collaborating with pop and rock lyricists and vocalists was fascinating, and I was particularly interested in his different composing philisophies between music meant to be performed live and music meant for a studio album. Finally there is a list of all of Glass's musical compositions and albums up to the writing of the book. This list has the book's only mention of my favorite Glass album: A Descent into the Maelstrom.

It is clear from my review that I found this book to be extremely limited. There are a lot of unanswered questions, the reader does not learn enough about the music itself, and one gets almost no sense of Glass as a person beyond his work. What is not so clear from my review is that I found what IS WRITTEN to be highly informative, extremely entertaining, and even in some weird sense uplifting, enlightening, and inspiring. The closest Glass comes to revealing his inner self is when he writes about Akhnaten (the person, not the opera). His understanding of the Pharoah is indeed amazing and touching - and very human.
Nikobar
I have always found Philip Glass an interesting artifact. Cool name. In the 80s he had a real presence in both the pop and art cultures, and his music has captivated me for entire minutes. However, the whole minimalist / repetitive / whateveryouwanttocallit method loses me fairly quickly. Did I enjoy Koyaanisqatsi? Yeah, but the FILM with the music, rather than listening to the music apart from the movie. And I thought Glass' music added to the film "Kundun" quite well. He has done a number of film scores.

He brought his opera "1,000 Airplanes on the Roof" to Ann Arbor and I took my oldest two children with me to hear it. Earlier in the day we went over the SKR Classical and bought some of his albums and he signed them for us. He was very kind and took time to talk with my son and daughter. When the music began I was quite impressed. There is this extremely low rumble that you feel before you hear it and the sound just fills your whole body and soars up and out of your hearing. Beautiful and wonderful stuff. However, the work goes on for three hours.

It is an almost incomprehensible story about a man or a woman who works in a copy shop and may or may not have been visited and possessed by aliens. Or he / she might just be nuts. Or maybe there is no such thing as reality. Or maybe it is the idea of a single independent reality that is false. (However, I am pretty sure that all of us there that night had paid with independently real money and gave up an independently real evening). You get the idea. I still thought it a worthwhile experience. My son and daughter have yet to forgive me for making them stay for the whole thing. Personally, I think it is clear that Glass has a certain kind of gift and some real talent. I am just not sure that I think repeating the music until one wants to commit violence is the correct compositional choice.

This work came after this book was published.

Here, we get a short history of the composer's life, his study at Julliard and with Nadia Boulanger (which is the most important study of his life, I gather). We also learn about the way he got started in music theater, his attitudes towards traditional opera (dead, dead, dead), and the fact that in his earlier days he drove a cab and worked as a plumber to keep body and soul together. I can relate!

The rest of the book tells us the background of three of his theater works: "Einstein on the Beach", "Satyargraha", and "Akhnaten". We also get the libretti and some sketches of the musical materials used in the works. The book also includes photos of the works and from his life.

If you are interested in Glass at all, this is a good place to get some information about the composer and a few of his major works. The book also discusses many of his other works in passing (through the mid-eighties).
Yainai
Here is a spectacular explaination of Glass's Portrait Trilogy of operas (Einstein on the Beach, Satyagraha, and Akhnaten), including lots of great insight into the musical subtelties, staging, casting, performances, and production. It includes several excellent pictures (color and B&W) of Glass, his ensemble, and scenes from the three operas. Also, a rare explaination of the staging of Einstein! A good read for anyone interested in modern music
Music by Philip Glass download epub
Author: Philip Glass
ISBN: 0060158352
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers (January 1987)
Pages: 222 pages