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John Wesley : A Brand from the Burning download epub

by Roy Hattersley


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Thank God for John Wesley, and Roy Hattersley merits accolades for writing such a poignant, informative and comprehensive biography detailing the tribulations and triumphs of a paramount Christian !

2 people found this helpful. The dust jacket of this book says that John Wesley is not a very easy man to like and after reading this book I tend to agree. He is also not a very easy man to understand. Fortunately, Roy Hattersley has written a book that helps the reader to at least partially understand Wesley, but he is still hard to like.

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John Wesley led the Second English Reformation. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. His Methodist 'Connexion' was divided from the Church of England. Roy Hattersley is a iter. He was elected to Parliament in 1964, and served in each of Harold Wilson's governments as well as Jim Callaghan's Cabinet before becoming deputy leader of the Labour Party in 1983. He is the author of fourteen books.

The Life of John Wesley: A Brand from the Burning (2002). ISBN 978-0-385-50334-1. Buster's Diaries (1999). uk: Roy Hattersley: Books. "Royal Society of Literature All Fellows". Blood and Fire: William and Catherine Booth and the Salvation Army (1999). 50 Years on: Prejudiced History of Britain Since the War (1997). Royal Society of Literature. Archived from the original on 5 March 2010. Retrieved 9 August 2010. Hattersley classified as a republican in The Guardian, theguardian.

The Life of John Wesley. John Wesley led the Second English Reformation. His Methodist 'Connexion' was divided from the Church of England, not by dogma and doctrine but by the new relationship which it created between clergy and people

The Life of John Wesley. His Methodist 'Connexion' was divided from the Church of England, not by dogma and doctrine but by the new relationship which it created between clergy and people. Throughout a life tortured by doubt about true faith and tormented by a series of bizarre relationships with women, Wesley kept his promise to 'live and die an ordained priest of the Established Church'. His Methodist 'Connexion' was divided from the Church of England, not by dogma and doctrine but by the new relationship which it created between clergy and people

John Wesley led the Second English Reformation.

Roy Hattersley follows Wesley’s spiritual journey, tracing his constant, often agonizing attempts to define the nature of virtue as well as the path to sanctity. The story of Wesley’s theological progress is vastly enriched by Hattersley’s revealing portrait of Wesley’s complex personality. A genuine scholar, Wesley published more work than any other author of the eighteenth century. He possessed phenomenal energy, traveling huge distances to preach and proselytize.

The title of Roy Hattersley’s lively, forthright biography echoes the phrase A brand plucked from the burning, which John Wesley wanted on his gravestone. Despite Wesley’s typical determination to control every detail, even beyond death, this epitaph was never used (his followers wanted something grander), but it sums up his conviction that he was marked by God to fulfil a particular destiny. As a boy, he was snatched from a window of his blazing family house, and the threat of the inferno, set against the hope of last-minute salvation, pervaded his spiritual life.

By Hattersley, Roy. Book Condition and format : Excellent, Hardcover. His Methodist Connexion was divided from the Church of England, not by dogma and doctrine but by the new relationship which it created between clergy and people. Read full description. This biography explores his life, career and beliefs.

Roy Hattersley argues that John Wesley's evangelical zeal helped to make the working class respectable in his life of the founder of Methodism, A Brand From the Burning. Published: 7:11 PM. Fire and brimstone. New York's gangland has inspired everyone from PG Wodehouse to Martin Scorsese, whose latest film traces the immigrant roots of the city. Robert McCrum investigates the enduring fascination of hoods.

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Comments: (7)

Rexfire
This book is a popular account of Wesley. There are some errors but generally readable.
Arthunter
Hattersley takes a complex subject and, I believe, turns in a fair treatment. If he has a socialist perspective, as one reviewer remarks, then we understand it from that particular bent. Again, contrary to a reviewer, he does not spend too much time examining Wesley's relationship with women. Wesley did not handle women well...too shy to express his inner feelings to the women he loved, too Georgian to be a good husband to the wife he finally chooses (and chooses unwisely), and susceptible to flirtation. This is an important aspect of Wesley's life.
More important, though, and Hattersley does it justice, is the relationship he has with the men who mean the most to him. Hattersley spends a great deal of time helping the reader understand Wesley's relationship to his brother Charles (tempestous at times, but always instantly forgiving), his greatest rival and best friend, George Whitefied. One wishes there was more to developing his relationship with his father (love/hate, respect/fear) and the relationship he had with his heir apparent, John Fletcher, as well as Asbury.
Wesley was not an original theologian. He is obtuse. His arguments are difficult to understand, and he waffled continually. Yet, his strength is his ability to borrow concepts from other denominations, even from outside Christianity, and then meld them into a coherent set of beliefs. Methodist opened Christian doors to the unchurched of the times--the poor working class. Wesley would be proud to have been called a socialist.
Read Hattersley's book. It is an honest appraisal. And then read other biographies. And then, do yourself a favor, and start on Wesley's Journals. With all his too human foibles, Wesley is a great man.
Daizil
I have to say I enjoyed this book. He does excellent justice to the significance and reasoning behind Wesley's actions and relationships with other people. I also liked Hattersley's tendency to bring in the story of the Methodist societies. Being an American, I liked the analysis of Wesley's attitude toward American Methodism. In fact, the analysis of Wesley's attitude toward many things seems to be good on the whole. What keeps this from being a 5 star book? Sometimes I felt as if this book drifted too much into the details of others' lives. While relationships were important for Wesley, necessary information can be given about those relationships without losing focus on Wesley. In terms of the author's attitude toward Wesley, I think the author had a fair attitude toward him. As a Wesleyan fanatic, I don't feel offended that the author ventured to show some of Wesley's faults and their consequences. Overall, highly recommended for someone who has any interest in great church leaders.
Kalrajas
After I read this brilliantly written book, I fell in love with the enigmatic John Wesley. He may have been eccentric, driven and rigid, but he also had a heart of gold evidenced by his compassion for animals and for turning vegetarian for ethical reasons. John Wesley was too vexed for marraige but his mystical Sermon entitled "The General Resurrection" envisioned an idyllic afterlife for all God's children and creatures. John Wesley was a valiant, charismatic and compelling Christian leader. Thank God for John Wesley, and Roy Hattersley merits accolades for writing such a poignant, informative and comprehensive biography detailing the tribulations and triumphs of a paramount Christian !
JoJolar
The dust jacket of this book says that John Wesley is not a very easy man to like and after reading this book I tend to agree. He is also not a very easy man to understand. Fortunately, Roy Hattersley has written a book that helps the reader to at least partially understand Wesley, but he is still hard to like.

The reader will be taken into Wesley's childhood, which is where the title of the book comes from since as a child he was plucked from his burning home at the very last minute. John Wesley's attachment to the Church of England seems to have come from his father, also an Anglican priest. Samuel Wesley was so attached to the state church and the monarch who sat at its head that he once left his wife because as a Jacobite she refused to say amen after a prayer in which he asked God's blessing on King William. Fortunately for all of those Methodists out there, John Wesley was far more influenced by his mother Susanna than by his father.

As Wesley becomes involved in the Holy Club that would become the foundation for Methodism we begin to see his overbearing personality in action. This club, derisively called Methodists was in existence before Wesley became a member but when he got there, he took the reigns and slowly builds what would become a major Protestant denomination. This overbearing personality is part of what makes Wesley so hard to like, but there is little doubt that the Methodist church would never have existed if he had been more docile. Wesley also tended to change his theological views over the years, sometimes quite abruptly. He would usually claim to have had a revelation from God when this happened and would sometimes even deny that he had made a change. When challenged he became very defensive and some of his tactics were less than noble. He was so autocratic that his enemies referred to him as Pope John. Still, one has to wonder if there would ever have been a Methodist Church if he had acted differently.

On the other hand, John Wesley seems to be sincerely interested in the plight of the poor, a segment of English society, which was sparsely served by the Established Church. His whole ministry in fact seems to have revolved around serving those who were overlooked by the Anglican Church. At the same time he lost many friends within the Methodist movement because of his fight to remove all vestiges of Calvinism from his movement. Without that fight, the Methodist Church could not be what it is today.

By nature this book is filled with sometimes deep theological issues which are sometimes hard for the lay person to follow. Hattersley has done a good job of trying to make the issues understandable but I must admit that the book is sometimes a little dry. Hattersley also uses several Latin phrases without a translation. This habit among some authors is a pet peeve of mine. My father graduated from high school in 1932 and at that time he was required to learn Latin. For most of us however, Latin was not even a real option in high school or college so we don't understand it and can't read it. I really wish this practice would cease; but it won't.

Overall, a very good, well-written, and informative book. Anyone with an interest in the Great Awakening or the Christian religion will find this book of much use. Methodists will find out many things about their founder and will be better able to understand their ritual and dogma after reading Hattersley's book. Reading this book will also allow the average Methodist to better connect with their ministers who seldom miss a chance to talk about John Wesley.
John Wesley : A Brand from the Burning download epub
Author: Roy Hattersley
ISBN: 0316860204
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Language: English
Publisher: Time Warner Books Uk; Reprint edition (June 2003)
Pages: 468 pages