» » I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59

I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59 download epub

by Douglas Edwards


Epub Book: 1826 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1187 kb.

Now Douglas Edwards, Employee Number 59, takes readers inside the .

Now Douglas Edwards, Employee Number 59, takes readers inside the Googleplex for the closest look you can get without an ID card, giving readers a chance to fully experience the potent mix of camaraderie and competition that makes up the company that changed the world. to its ethos to always hire someone smarter than yourself, I'm Feeling Lucky captures for the first time the unique, self-invented, culture of the world's most transformative corporation. Welcome to the "Google Experience".

I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59 is a 2011 book by Douglas Edwards, who was Google's first director of marketing and brand management. The book tells his story of what it was to be on the inside during the rise of one of the most powerful internet companies from its start-up beginnings. The critical reception of I'm Feeling Lucky has been mostly positive, with the book receiving consistent praise for its treatment of life in the Googleplex.

Now Doug Edwards, Employee Number 59, offers the first inside view of Google, giving readers a. .I’m Feeling Lucky captures for the first time the unique, self-invented, yet profoundly important culture of the world’s most transformative corporation.

Now Doug Edwards, Employee Number 59, offers the first inside view of Google, giving readers a chance to fully experience the bizarre mix of camaraderie and competition at this phenomenal company. Edwards, Google’s first director of marketing and brand management, describes it as it happened.

I’m Feeling Lucky is funny, revealing, and instructive, with an insider’s perspective I hadn’t seen anywhere before. Douglas Edwards recounts Google's stumble and rise with verve and humor and a generosity of spirit. He kept me turning the pages of this engrossing tale. I thought I had followed the Google story closely, but I realized how much I’d missed after reading-and enjoying-this book. James Fallows, author of Postcards from Tomorrow Square. Douglas Edwards is indeed lucky, sort of an accidental millionaire, a reluctant bystander in a sea of computer geniuses who changed the world. Ken Auletta, author of Googled: The End of the World as We Know It.

You know what Google does," Douglas Edwards writes in his relentlessly upbeat memoir of working at the company .

You know what Google does," Douglas Edwards writes in his relentlessly upbeat memoir of working at the company for six years. It finds stuff on the internet. But it does so much more than that. Edwards, the 59th person to be hired by Google, worked in marketing and "consumer brand management" for the firm between 1999 and 2005, but he didn't come up with the "don't be evil" slogan. In 2001, though, he did include it in a list of "Ten Things We've Found to Be True", which earned the company "a handful of kudos from users for our stand in favour of integrity".

I'm Feeling Lucky book. Now Doug Edwards, Employee Number 59, offers the first inside view of Google, giving readers a chance to fully experience the bizarre mix of camaraderie and competition at this phenomenal company. Edwards, Google’s first director of Comparing Google to an ordinary business is like comparing a rocket to an Edsel.

Douglas Edwards wasn’t an engineer or a twentysomething fresh out of school when he received a job offer from a small . I’m Feeling Lucky reveals what it’s like to be indeed lucky, sort of an accidental millionaire, a reluctant bystander in a sea of computer geniuses who changed the world.

But founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin needed staff to develop the brand identity of their brainchild, and Edwards fit the bill with his journalistic background at the San Jose Mercury News, the newspaper of Silicon Valley.

Now Douglas Edwards, Employee Number 59, takes readers inside the Googleplex for the closest look you can get without an.Edwards, Google's first director of marketing and brand management, describes it as it happened.

Douglas Edwards joined Google as its 50 something employee on November 29, 1999 just about a.

Douglas Edwards joined Google as its 50 something employee on November 29, 1999 just about a year after founding and full 5 years till March 4, 2005 before its stunning IPO in 2004. Before Google he was working for San Jose Mercury News, a 150 year old newspaper managing their online product Merc (The Newspaper of Silicon Valley). Douglas was the first director of Google managing its early days marketing and brand management, much of what we saw of initial days Google marketing was written by him. He has penned the text and documentation of many of the early products the mountain view firm.

“An exciting story [that] shines light on the inner workings of the fledgling Google and on the personalities of its founders.”—The Daily BeastIn its infancy, Google embraced extremes—endless days fueled by unlimited free food, nonstop data-based debates, and blood-letting hockey games. The company’s fresh-from-grad-school leaders sought more than old notions of success; they wanted to make all the information in the world available to everyone—instantly. Google, like the Big Bang, was a singularity—an explosive release of raw intelligence and unequaled creative energy—and while others have described what Google accomplished, no one has explained how it felt to be a part of it. Until now.As employee number 59, Douglas Edwards was a key part of Google’s earliest days. Experience the unnerving mix of camaraderie and competition as Larry Page and Sergey Brin create a famously nonhierarchical structure, fight against conventional wisdom, and race to implement myriad new features while coolly burying broken ideas. I’m Feeling Lucky captures the self-created culture of the world’s most transformative corporation and offers unique access to the emotions experienced by those who virtually overnight built one of the world’s best-known brands.“Edwards does an excellent job of telling his story with a fun, outsider-insider voice. The writing is sharp.”—Boston Globe“An affectionate, compulsively readable recounting of the early years of Google.”—Publishers Weekly


Comments: (7)

Use_Death
This isn't just some factual account of events in Google's history. After all, Doug has been known as "the voice of Google" given his involvement in most of Google's user interactions and communications. Thus the book is written in that particular voice - a narrative that is able to address even the most technical concerns related while still making it approachable to the average user. After all, Doug is a marketing guy at heart and never claimed to be an engineer. Some have found the language to be too simplistic at times, but I found it vibrant and refreshing in tone and thus a pleasure to read even when discussing the more stressful situations Doug had to deal with.

Thus the book flows along two lines. On the one hand, it provides a striking inside look at Google's early history including milestone events such as their first search deal with AOL and the development of AdWords. But at the same time it's really just the tale of a marketing guy trying to redefine the job based on the technically-driven and data-obsessed engineers that were fundamental to growing Google to the company that it is today.

The book has certainly given me a lot to think about in terms of both my own marketing job and Google as a company. While Doug makes sure to tell all sides of the story and not just the warm and fuzzy stuff, he does seem to have a particular slant here - one last message as Google's voice that he has to deliver. If anything, this feels like Doug's last message to us users - an attempt to explain how Google operates at its core and thus presents a different view of the company given the big decisions it makes that get splashed all over the news. Google isn't quite the information monster and privacy villain that many present it to be. But it is moving solely to the beat of its own drum and its own concept of what they feel is in the best interests of the user.

At the same time, it's an amazing exploration of marketing and how the old concepts may not quite work in the increasingly product-aligned world that we live in. Branding goes beyond just thinking of the company as a whole but building images and ideas around individual product lines, especially in a tech world.
Abywis
This a very good look at this technology in its early years. We get a inside view at the conflicts, successes , strategies , and competitive landscape that they had to confront. The pace of change is quite breathtaking and means everyone is working all the time. There is some effort to address this issue of being at work all the time with out meaningfull time off and how that affects the authors personal relationships. We are told that there is a price to pay for the all encompassing work schedule. This is the confession to wife, children and family that work comes first. Many careers are like that and it takes some major juggling to make it work for the author and his family.

I thought the comparsison and contrast of his previous employment in less stressfully environment was insightfully. Older established companies he had worked for we're not at the cutting edge of technology and were losing the race . They had grown complacent and falling further behind these juggernauts. But he did get two weeks paid vacation and holidays off to be with the family. We don't get a clear answer on where the balance comes in between work and play.

Gourmet food keeps the troops happy and many other perks makes the long hours more palitable. Giving employees time to work on there on projects is a stroke of genius. It gets workers to buy more into the bigger goals of the firm and there own projects as well.

This is a worthwhile read of the life and times of one of the original employees.
Felolak
I was hoping for a little more insight on the company and wanted to be taken on the ride of start up to billion dollar company. The author is a good writer so the book does flow nicely, but lacks any real in depth stories about the company and how it grew. I could tell right away, and not surprisingly, the author was not able to get into fine details, nor does he know everything that went on in the company (he is 55, not 1-10).

I enjoyed the chapters toward the end "The Sell of a new Machine, "Don't Let Marketing Drive", and "Mistakes we Made". These chapters offered some good information that some will certainly find helpful as the author takes you through some of the thought processes and setting up some functions.

My favorite of the "Ten Things We've Found to be True":
1) Focus on the user and all else will follow.
2) It's best to do one thing really, really well.
3) There's always more information out there.
4) The need for information crosses all borders.
5) You don't need a suit to be serious.

Silicon Valley start ups are still an exciting and foreign word to many, so keep learning and exploring. This book does provide some good insight on working at one of the best on the web.
Umi
Doug gives you a funny inside story of an ex-worker. Most of the stuff here is personal, and doesn't give you the full picture. But some insights are incredible, especially when it comes to people like Larry Page or Marissa Mayer.
You can also get to FEEL the unique corporate culture of Google - crazy nerds working their souls out, in order to cash out with stock options. Edwards is a very funny man, and his style of writing is above average. He knows how to tell a story with style. He's not just another Googler - he's a ex-journalist.
For less than 10 bucks you get a Silicon Valley fairy tale with some cool remarks on some genius minds of the Google saga.
Anyway, it's a very easy read, and is essential for people addicted to Google stories. He's a lucky guy, and we're lucky to get this text from him.
I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59 download epub
Professionals & Academics
Author: Douglas Edwards
ISBN: 0547416997
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
Language: English
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1 edition (July 12, 2011)
Pages: 432 pages