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Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of the New Yorker download epub

by Thomas Kunkel


Epub Book: 1469 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1466 kb.

The book will give pleasure to all intelligent readers whether or not they know Ross or are fans of The New Yorker. Genius in Disguise is the kind of biography which is entertaining beyond the limits of its subject matter.

The book will give pleasure to all intelligent readers whether or not they know Ross or are fans of The New Yorker. Anderson, GSLIS, Simmons Coll. Even someone who would not think that they would enjoy a biography of a media figure should find a lot to like in this engaging book. Using anecdote, history, and a wide range of sources, Kunkel paints a picture of Ross as a man, which in turn teaches us a lot about the New Yorker and the magazine industry.

Genius in Disguise is more than a portrait of Harold Ross.

Originally published: New York : Random House, c1995. Includes bibliographical references (p. -481) and index. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

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Thomas Kunkel has written the first comprehensive biography of Harold W. Ross, the high school dropout and Colorado . Ross, the high school dropout and Colorado miner's son who somehow blew out of the West to become a seminal figure in American journalism and letters, and a man whose story is as improbable as it is entertaining. GENIUS IN DISGUISE: Harold Ross of The New Yorker. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

Genius in disguise: Harold Ross of The New Yorker, Thomas Kunkel. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. Though in time The New Yorker came to fulfill all the rash promises Ross had advanced in the magazine’s famous 1924 prospectus, he could never have imagined what his little fifteen-cent comic paper would come to do, or how robust its legacy would be. Ross’s New Yorker changed the face of contemporary fiction, perfected a new form of literary journalism, established new standards for humor and comic art, swayed the cultural and social agendas, and became synonymous with sophistication. It replaced convention with innovation.

Genius in Disguise book. Ross’s New Yorker changed the face of contemporary fiction, perfected a new form of literary journalis. nd became synonymous with sophistication. In the book, Kunkel often takes the position, popular in Ross's time, that Ross's success was improbable, since he was, basically, a tramp newspaperman with a poor education, before he came to New York to build his career in publishing. But throughout his life, Ross made great professional (not personal) choices.

Kunkel observes that ""the man from Aspen was an outsider set loose in New York, exhilarated, intimidated, and appalled by turns at. .

Kunkel observes that ""the man from Aspen was an outsider set loose in New York, exhilarated, intimidated, and appalled by turns at what he saw, but never, ever bored. Kunkel writes with such fair-mindedness and so convincingly that readers, including the old lady from Dubuque, will need to remind themselves that they didn't know Ross personally. In getting this well-rounded portrait of Ross (1892-1951) on paper, the first-time biographer has balanced large details with small.

In a great paradox of American letters, the urbane and witty New Yorker was founded by a former tramp newspaperman from Colorado with a 10th grade e ducation. Yet Harold W. Ross revealed an irrepressible spirit, an insatiable curiosity and a bristling intellect--all the qualities that distinguished The New Yorker.

Comments: (7)

Quinthy
Usually I wouldn't use the words "charming" and "curmudgeon" to describe a person because it seems as if the two words would cancel each other out, but I think they are great words to describe Harold Ross, founder and long-time editor of The New Yorker. Charming would refer to someone who was upbeat and funny and "on" most of the time, whereas curmudgeon would describe someone who was grouchy and ornery. He could be both of these, as well as brilliant and a host of other descriptive words.

I have read The New Yorker for years and am so glad I finally read ABOUT the magazine, because it is endlessly fascinating. How I wish I had known Harold Ross with his innate intelligence and superior sense of humor! It would appear he could do everything and anything with the exception of marriage. He adored his daughter and celebrated his friends and his magazine up until the very end, which of course came years too soon. He is way up there on my list of people I would want on a desert island! This was such a fun book to read, and I am now heading to the other books that have been written about The New Yorker and everyone involved with it, especially Harold Ross.
Onaxan
This wonderful biography tells the story of Harold Ross, The New Yorker's founding editor, and his making and management of this magazine from 1925 until his death in 1951. In the book, Kunkel often takes the position, popular in Ross's time, that Ross's success was improbable, since he was, basically, a tramp newspaperman with a poor education, before he came to New York to build his career in publishing. But throughout his life, Ross made great professional (not personal) choices. And, he had a formidable intellect and curiosity, terrific taste, integrity, and an eye for talent.
In part, Ross was underestimated in his lifetime because he had the unfashionable style in the office of a neurotic worrier. Here's Ogden Nash describing the publisher on the job: "His expression is always that of a man who has just swallowed a bug. Once a day at least he calls you into his office and says, "This magazine is going to hell." He never varies the phrase. Then he says, "We haven't got any organization. I'm licked. We've got too many geniuses around and nobody to take any responsibility. He has smoked five cigarettes while saying that. Then he takes a drink of water, prowls up and down, cries "My God!" loudly and rapidly, and you go out and try to do some work." A captivating book.
Dog_Uoll
Genius in Disguise is the kind of biography which is entertaining beyond the limits of its subject matter. Even someone who would not think that they would enjoy a biography of a media figure should find a lot to like in this engaging book.

Using anecdote, history, and a wide range of sources, Kunkel paints a picture of Ross as a man, which in turn teaches us a lot about the New Yorker and the magazine industry. It is published with The New Yorker Prospectus, an article called "Theory and Practice of Editing New Yorker Articles", and Ross Query Sheets as appendices. Additionally, Kunkel provides a selected bibliography with helpful pointers to further reading.

This book would make a good companion piece to Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker by Ved Mehta. I would recommend it for fans of The New Yorker, people interested in the Algonquin Round Table, or simply for anyone with an appreciation for well-written literary biography.
Linn
This is a book that I tried to read as slowly as possible. Because it is a book to savor. And because I did not want it to end. Kunkel so beautifully captured the age of The New Yorker (and how its celebration and critique of its city became a celebration and critique of life and the world). I wish I had not taken to so long to find and fall in love with this book. It is splendid.
Felhann
An excellent portrait of the man, and the difficulty of establishing a glossy magazine. Ross would probably be exasperated but amused that this, "little old lady from Dubuke," has read the New Yorker for decades.
Bukelv
This is great book if you're a fan of The New Yorker, a writer, editor, or just enjoy a good biography. Mr. Ross was a very interesting character, and his handling of great writers and their egos when he was their editor was absolutely perfect.
Chuynopana
harold ross was a genuine character! the biography is well written and shows his personal life.i really recommend it to fans of the new yorker.
Fascinating portrait not only of a creative genius but of a unique era in American culture which allowed The New Yorker to evolve as an institutional chronicle of its times.
Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of the New Yorker download epub
Professionals & Academics
Author: Thomas Kunkel
ISBN: 0786703237
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
Language: English
Publisher: Carroll & Graf Pub; 1st Carroll & Graf trade paperback ed edition (May 1, 1996)
Pages: 512 pages