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Well Enough Alone: A Cultural History of My Hypochondria download epub

by Jennifer Traig


Epub Book: 1210 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1938 kb.

And by the end, her journey leaves her more knowledgeable, a little less neurotic, and-one might say-healthier.

The good news is that Jennifer Traig does not have lupus, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease, Crohn's disease, or muscular dystrophy. What she does have is hypochondria.

I read Jennifer Traig's first book "Devil in the Details" as I am fascinated with OCD. Her first book about being affected . WELL ENOUGH ALONE is funny and surprisingly sweet. A bit unfocused at times, it is a good book overall and gets better as it goes along. Her first book about being affected with "scrupulosity" was interesting, and she seemed a tragic and tormented person. In this book, "Well Enough Alone", she just seems annoying.

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Jennifer Traig's Well Enough Alone is a memoir centered around the author's health, a history of the real and perceived . A book-length investigation of hypochondria might seem an unlikely vehicle for humor, but Traig's a very funny writer.

Jennifer Traig's Well Enough Alone is a memoir centered around the author's health, a history of the real and perceived sicknesses and syndromes and symptoms that have shaped her life. Traig writes about a childhood soaked in free samples of prescription medications foisted on her father, a physician, about her discomfort with her body and its emanations, about her life as a hypochondriacal college and grad student. There's a delightful turn of phrase or two on nearly every page of the book.

Аудиокнига "Act Natural: A Cultural History of Misadventures in Parenting", Jennifer Traig. Читает Emily Woo Zeller. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

And by the end, her journey leaves her more knowledgeable, a little less neurotic, and-one might say-healthier. I really enjoyed Jennifer Traig's previous book and I was looking forward to reading this one. Traig has a knack for taking a "serious" subject and turning it on its ear - all the while feeding us full of useful information on that very same subject.

Well Enough Alone: A Cultural History of My Hypochondria. And by the end, her journey leaves her more knowledgeable, a little less neurotic, and-one might say-healthier. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Jennifer Traig’s hypochondria goes under the microscope in her bizarre and compelling memoir Well Enough Alone. Or rather she describes, often in excruciatingly exact detail, a whole array of itches and potentially fatal illnesses that you’ve probably never imagined.

Read "Well Enough Alone A Cultural History of My Hypochondria" by Jennifer . A Cultural History of My Hypochondria.

A Cultural History of My Hypochondria.

The hilarious first-person account of life as a hypochondriac-from the critically acclaimed author of Devil in the Details.Jennifer Traig does not suffer from lupus, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's Disease, or muscular dystrophy. Nor does she have SUDS, the mysterious disorder that claims healthy young Asian men in their sleep. What she does have is hypochondria. In Well Enough Alone, Traig provides an uproariously funny inquiry into her ailment, as well as a well-researched history of the disorder. While chronicling her life as a hypochondriac and the minor conditions that helped to fuel her persistent self-diagnosis, she offers a literary tour of the disorder's past and present. And by the end, her journey leaves her more knowledgeable, a little less neurotic, and-one might say-healthier.

Comments: (7)

Runehammer
Exceptionally entertaining, laugh out loud funny and smart, Jennifer Traig belongs at the same table as comedic writers like Tina Fey, Mindy Kaling, Jenny Lawson and Chelsea Handler. Neurotic, self-deprecating, clever and insightful, this is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Traig describes a childhood overcome with health obsessive tendencies and obsessions. Her candor, stories of her medically minded and irreverent family and youth plagued by uncertainty are utterly hilarious. For anyone who has ever found themselves preoccupied with a headache, fanatical about a freckle or overly Google-checking chest pains, this is the book for you. Part psychosomatic discussion, part awkward adolescence/adulthood memoir, Traig is every neurotic writer, creative and artist. A bit hardwired to find comfort in suffering and a bit inclined to seek reassurance, she takes the reader down a journey into her life bereft of normalcy and filled with worry. I found it relatable, poignant and witty. (Disclaimer: I do not know the author and was not given the book for free)
Felolv
I just finished reading this book, and I can honestly say it was written with such wit and insight that it made the whole subject of personal and historical hypochondriasis entertaining. (How's that for an opener?) It is almost impossible to believe that someone with such insight into a subject could actually suffer from the symptoms she imagines. As a nurse, I empathized on every page. As a reader, I felt guilty being so gleefully entertained by her experiences. It is hard to find a book that truly is humorous without seeming contrived, and this is one of those rare books. Traiger has the gift of keeping a narrative going - on a fairly limited subject- and never lets the subject gets stale. In fact, the book may be too short because you miss her when the book is over.
Kerry
This is the second memoir by Jenny Traig I have had the pleasure of reading and laughed aloud several times - no small feat as I was recovering from surgery at the time. Much of what the author addresses is only funny when seen through her eyes, and god bless whomever she inherited that from. If nothing else, this book will encourage you to learn to laugh at yourself, which can really come in handy.
Gaxaisvem
I was disappointed. It seemed to meander all over the place with very little focus on her hypochondria. I did not finish because I was so far in that there was no way even half the book was going to be about the subject.
Error parents
I read Jennifer Traig's first book "Devil in the Details" as I am fascinated with OCD. Her first book about being affected with "scrupulosity" was interesting, and she seemed a tragic and tormented person.
In this book, "Well Enough Alone", she just seems annoying. Her time lines are confusing; was she a grad student and teaching while she lived with the druggie roommates? Was she becoming an observant Jew while partying with her [......] pals? My confusion may stem from having read an earlier autobiographical book by her, and trying to overlay it with this one, and the two do not seem congruent in any way. Maybe this is an alternate history.
The historical info. on hypochondria and diseases is interesting, I would have enjoyed a book just about that. Traig just falls short too often on her attempts at sarcastic humour and I never felt sorry for her at all, just annoyed and impatient for her to grow-the-h*ll-up, get some clues and get a life.
Lynnak
Shipping was very fast and the book came in excellent condition, very happy with my purchase, will be purchasing in the future for any and all my book needs :)
Hadadel
I rented this from the library a long time ago and just had to get it. I love her writing and this is another great book.
Jennifer Traig was pretty sure she had cancer. Also, lupus, tuberculosis and kidney failure. And herpes, rickets and Lyme disease. Plus, she might have had a heart attack somewhere along the way. As a hypochondriac, Traig is constantly convincing herself that she has been stricken with all kinds of illnesses; the symptoms are real, but the results are always negative. Or, almost always. She does have obsessive compulsive disorder and irritable bowel syndrome. She suffered from an actual eating disorder and, she will tell you, has frizzy hair.

While hypochondriacs exist only as the butt of bad jokes for most of us, Traig's latest memoir, WELL ENOUGH ALONE, explores the disorder in a personal and compelling way. Traig is often the butt of her own jokes, but this book makes it clear that hypochondria is no laughing matter.

Traig explains that hypochondria doesn't generally manifest until adulthood, yet she had signs of it as a child. In second grade she was worried about brain aneurysms, not to mention contaminated school lunches and injury from risky playground equipment. Her family seemed to be full of hypochondriacs, some of them genuinely sick, and her parents' medical professions also gave her fuel for the fire. She soon figured out that doctors worked hard and fussed over the sick, who got to rest and be pampered. Being sick, she reasoned, was the better deal. As she got older, the worry turned into real hypochondria, and she often found herself in the doctor's office with lists of pains and symptoms, rashes and spots.

Her teenage years were consumed with OCD and her eating disorder, and this seemed to keep the hypochondria at bay. But it resurfaced in college, and she began to self-medicate. She also started working in medical offices that, instead of worsening her hypochondria, actually soothed it; she found that having some control in a medical environment, even if it was just organizing patient files, helped her feel more in control over her symptoms. Still, her college years (and they are many, as she earned a PhD in literature) were ones of poor nutrition, alcohol and non-prescribed prescription drugs as well as angst at literary theories like deconstructionism. None of this sounds quite funny, but truly, Traig has a way of making it so.

Because the market has been flooded with horrible childhood memoirs, Traig's is refreshing. She doesn't lay blame (except with her genetic pool), and her tone is good-natured and self-mocking. She is a charming narrator, and her supporting cast --- her raucous and kind family and strung-out friends --- are interesting as well. From her unorthodox teaching methods as a grad student to her love of 1970s drug company marketing practices, Traig expands her story beyond her body yet is able to tie it all in to make a cohesive whole. She explains hypochondria clearly but without dull medical technical details, and is sensitive enough to make sure that the readers are laughing with her and not at hypochondriacs in general.

The book also includes some oddly hypnotic and beautifully graphic Victorian portraits of patients with conditions like Lupus Erythematosus, Molluscum Fibrosum and Rhinoscleroma. The appendix is full of gems such as "handy phrases for the hypochondriac traveler as translated somewhat unreliably on my computer," "diseases that would make nice names if they meant something else" and "hypochondria haiku."

WELL ENOUGH ALONE is funny and surprisingly sweet. A bit unfocused at times, it is a good book overall and gets better as it goes along.

--- Reviewed by Sarah Rachel Egelman
Well Enough Alone: A Cultural History of My Hypochondria download epub
Professionals & Academics
Author: Jennifer Traig
ISBN: 1594483809
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
Language: English
Publisher: Riverhead Books; Reprint edition (July 7, 2009)
Pages: 272 pages