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The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt download epub

by Eleanor Roosevelt


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Start by marking The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt as Want to Read . This book was originally published in 1946. I first read it in 1960 just after I attended a lecture by Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962).

Start by marking The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Over the years I have read everything I could get my hands on about Eleanor. The book is well written but it must be taken in the age it was written, by a woman of the 19th century. The book is written in the reserve style of This book was originally published in 1946.

The long and eventful life of Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) was full of rich experiences and courageous actions. The last half of the book after FDR died Eleanor did a lot of world travel and work with the UN. Her view of the world is well presented and fascinating at times. The niece of Theodore Roosevelt, she married a Columbia University law student named Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who gradually ascended in the world of New York politics to reach the presidency in 1932.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt" для .

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. The daughter of one of New York’s most influential families, niece of Theodore Roosevelt, and wife of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt witnessed some of the most remarkable decades in modern history, as America transitioned from the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, and the Depression to World War II and the Cold War.

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɪnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political figure, diplomat and activist

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɪnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political figure, diplomat and activist. She served as the First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1933, to April 12, 1945, during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, making her the longest-serving First Lady of the United States. Roosevelt served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.

A champion of the downtrodden, Eleanor drew on her experience and used her role as First Lady to help those in need. Intimately involved in her husband’s political life, from the governorship of New York to the White House, Eleanor would eventually become a powerful force of her own, heading women’s organizations and youth movements, and battling for consumer rights, civil rights, and improved housing. In the years after FDR’s death, this inspiring, controversial, and outspoken leader would become a .

Eleanor Roosevelt was not overjoyed to become the first lady. The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt. Winfield, Betty Houchin. The Legacy of Eleanor Roosevelt. In many ways, she had created an independent life for herself in New York and dreaded leaving it behind. Most especially, Eleanor was going to miss teaching at the Todhunter School, a finishing school for girls she had helped purchase in 1926. Presidential Studies Quarterly 2. (1990): 699-706. Slow and Steady: Women's Changing Roles in 1930s America.

Eleanor Roosevelt was the niece of one . president, Theodore Roosevelt, and married a man who would become another, Franklin D. Roosevelt. Redefining the role of the first lady, she advocated for human and women's rights, held press conferences and penned her own column. After leaving the White House in 1945, Eleanor became chair of the . s Human Rights Commission. The groundbreaking first lady died in 1962 in New York City. Outside of her political work, Eleanor wrote several books about her life and experiences, including This Is My Story (1937), This I Remember (1949), On My Own (1958) and Autobiography (1961).

Eleanor Roosevelt Book. biography by Blanche Wiesen Cook. Page 278 Cook begins the last paragraph by stating that Eleanor was the only woman on the four-week train trip. This page is all about Eleanor Roosevelt. What I'd like to know: is if this absolute. Were there no other females, which is saying that Eleanor had no female 'help' as a member of the Roosevelt family might have had, or were there literally no other females at all? I'm interested since in 1920, this seems quite remarkable. It sounds so much like she was a 'prisoner' kept in semi-isolation.

The long and eventful life of Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) was full of rich experiences and courageous actions. The niece of Theodore Roosevelt, she married a distant relative and Columbia University law student named Franklin Delano Roosevelt; he gradually ascended throughout the world of New York politics to reach the U.S. presidency in 1932. Throughout his three terms, Eleanor Roosevelt was not only intimately involved in FDRâ?s personal and political life, but led womenâ?s organizations and youth movements and fought for consumer welfare, civil rights, and improved housing. During World War II she traveled with her husband to meet leaders of many powerful nations; after his death in 1945 she worked as a UN delegate, chairman of the Commission on Human Rights, newspaper columnist, Democratic party activist, world-traveler, and diplomat. By the end of her life, Eleanor Roosevelt was recognized throughout the world for her fortitude and commitment to the ideals of liberty and human rights. Her autobiography constitutes a self-portrait no biography can match for its candor and liveliness, its wisdom, tolerance, and breadth of view—a self-portrait of one of the greatest American humanitarians of our time.

Comments: (7)

Uylo
A must read for anyone interested in the Roosevelt era beginning with Teddy. Rich accounts of Eleanor's personal reflections on events that affected the nation and the world. Eleanor's growth and personality development comes through clearly as she reveals inner thoughts and motives throughout her life. I had the honor to meet Mrs. Roosevelt in 1962 and was fortunate to spend a great deal of time with her on the occasion of a convocation honoring her as Wayne State University in Detroit. Although I was merely a student who happened to be chosen to introduce her prior to her speech, she pointedly singled me out as someone she wanted to get to know. On her insistence I sat next to her at the banquet before the gathering. She peppered me with questions and showed a genuine interest in me. This genuineness is evident in her autobiography. As I read it, I felt like I was listening to an old friend.
Qumenalu
I wanted to read this book to gain a better understanding of U.S. history in the 40s, but Eleanor mentioned so many things w/o explaining. She assumed a lot of prior knowledge that I don't have. I found the last half of the book (after the death of FDR) to be much more interesting than the first half, but if you're interested in her not-so-normal early years, you might enjoy that part of the book. She doesn't say very much about the war, and that surprised me.
mr.Mine
For the first half of this book we see Eleanor Roosevelt as the wife of FDR. In that roll she served a lot of tea to guests and took a backseat. I must admit I didn't find that too interesting.

The last half of the book after FDR died Eleanor did a lot of world travel and work with the UN. Her view of the world is well presented and fascinating at times.
Envias
About a third of the way through, I had the thought that she must have kept a diary of absolutely everything she ever did. The detail was excruciating at times, especially when it seemed that she was doing nothing but traveling from house to house, having teas and holding or attending events. Some have said that it got better when she described her life after FDR, but I didn't get that far, unfortunately.
PC-rider
I enjoyed this telling of Eleanor's life more than I did biographies written by others. It allowed for a more in depth story of her life. It did not focus on the sad times and Franklin's affairs as much as other books and video. It is most certainly not a waste of time to read. I recommend this for any reader over the age of 12.
Zodama
The book was very informative. I knew some of the things mentioned in the book but a lot of other stuff I did not know. She was a very busy lady with all her traveling for the President and then later for the United Nations. The book gave me insights to what her husband and President Truman tried to get going in the 40's to help our country. Her work with the United Nations to promote peace in the world was good. Her children were a big part of her life also. I enjoyed the book very much. I wish that I could have met her.
Unirtay
Well written book, very interesting describing her early years, then her years in the White House with Franklin, She was a remarkable woman, and I learned to appreciate her for her many accomplishments. I was raised in a staunch Republican party, lived in Washington in the early 50's and listened to my father rant and rave about her. I really wanted to learn more about her and glad that I had this opportunity. The last quarter of the book became a bit tedious, but probably because I had answered most of the questions I had about her, by that time.

I think she was a brilliant woman, and had a natural understanding of "regular" folks even though she was born to an aristocratic American family, Great history book.
I loved hearing Eleanor's voice as she traversed the vast landscape of her phenomenal life as isolated orphan, First Lady, mother of 5, civil rights pioneer and women's rights frontiers-woman, to champion of human rights at the UN, here at home, and in every corner of the globe. Her life of civil service is certainly unmatched because it was simply the essence of who she was.
The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt download epub
Reference & Collections
Author: Eleanor Roosevelt
ISBN: 0060136154
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Reference & Collections
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers; 1st edition (September 1961)