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The Spy Next Door: The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Damaging FBI Agent in U.S. History download epub

by Elaine Shannon


Epub Book: 1105 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1494 kb.

by. Shannon, Elaine; Blackman, Ann. Publication date. Hanssen, Robert, Hanssen, Robert, Hanssen, Robert, United States. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

The Spy Next Door" is an astonishing easy reading story about a common man with an uncommon ability to elude. Ann Blackman and Elaine Shannon are investigative reporters that give a biography of a man whose life is unbelievable, yet true and amazing. The "Spy Next Door" page turner includes his life from ostracized child to super spy for the Soviets. The only son of a Chicago Cop, he never received his father's approval, was a high school misfit, who developed.

The Spy Next Door book. Now veteran Time reporters Ann Blackman and Elaine Shannon reveal the truth about Robert Hanssen and his 15 years of exceptionally destructive espionage

The Spy Next Door book. Now veteran Time reporters Ann Blackman and Elaine Shannon reveal the truth about Robert Hanssen and his 15 years of exceptionally destructive espionage. Blackman and Shannon brilliantly explore why Hanssen decided to betray his family, his church and his country, and how he got away with it. And they reveal the vast extent of Hanssen's damage and why his actions shattered the confidence of a proud and mighty FBI.

In this biography of FBI agent Robert Hanssen, the authors tell how . Bibliographic Details. Title: The Spy Next Door: The Extraordinary Secret. Founded and operated by trained historians, Ground Zero Books, Lt. serves the book collector, the scholar, and institutions.

In this biography of FBI agent Robert Hanssen, the authors tell how Hanssen was recruited, how he operated, and how his superiors failed to see the signs that this family man and bureaucrat was, for two decades, living a double life and passing intelligence secrets to the enemy. Publisher: Little, Brown and Company, Boston, MA. Publication Date: 2002. We focus on the individual, and pride ourselves on our personal service.

Ann Blackman and Elaine Shannon reveal the truth about Robert Hanssen and hi. .The Spy Next Door : The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Damaging FBI Agent in U. S. History

Ann Blackman and Elaine Shannon reveal the truth about Robert Hanssen and hi. History. by Elaine Shannon and Ann Blackman.

The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most. Damaging FBI Agent in . Hanssen, however, sold secrets to the Soviet Union and to Russia off and on from 1980 to 1999.

One of the most damaging double agents in modern American history, Robert Hanssen gave the Soviets, and later the Russians, thousands of.Hanssen was only the third agent in FBI history charged with spying.

One of the most damaging double agents in modern American history, Robert Hanssen gave the Soviets, and later the Russians, thousands of pages of classified material that revealed such sensitive national security secrets as the identities of Soviets spying for the . specifics about America’s nuclear operations and the existence of an FBI-built tunnel underneath the Soviet Embassy in Washington. Hanssen’s double life began in 1979 and ended in 2001, when he was arrested after the FBI discovered, thanks to help from an ex-KGB officer, that Hanssen was a mole.

2001:The Spy Next Door: The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen: the Most Damaging FBI Agent in . Hampton, NH: Chivers North America. I only have one complaint about this superior work: the work did not focus much on Hanssen’s post arrest experiences, such as what happened at the arraignment, the sentencing, and how he is adapting to prison life. Good heavens, I was sucked into this fabulous book. I loved the suspense.

Read "The Spy Next Door The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert . by Elaine Shannon,Ann Blackman.

Read "The Spy Next Door The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Damaging FBI Agent in . Two veteran "Time" magazine reporters present the shocking, fascinating accoun.

Two veteran Time reporters present a riveting glimpse into the life of Robert Hanssen, a seemingly quintessential surburban father and a trusted and loyal FBI agent who, after fifteen years of extremely damaging espionage, betrayed his family, his church, and his country - and got away with it, destroying the confidence of the FBI. 125,000 first printing.

Comments: (7)

Marinara
There was no new information than any of the other books about Robert Hanssen. This one did not keep my attention the way the others did.
Llallayue
This book demonstrated how easily someone can be addicted to their own sense of power. Self righteous, men or women who allow pride to dominate their thoughts can be easily turned to a dark side. So amazing that he was overlooked. The damage he did to our country, will be felt for decades to come. The lives of men who tried to help us forever gone. Not much worse than a traitor.
Lavivan
Bought for my grandma... she loved the book and the movie "Breach" that is based on the same story
Jerinovir
A good read and researched well and kept me interested thoughout. This book really covers Hanssen's background and how he was discovered.
Preve
"The Spy Next Door" is an astonishing easy reading story about a common man with an uncommon ability to elude. Robert Hanssen's 25 year job at the FBI gave him access to carefully guarded national security secrets. Ann Blackman and Elaine Shannon are investigative reporters that give a biography of a man whose life is unbelievable, yet true and amazing.

The "Spy Next Door" page turner includes his life from ostracized child to super spy for the Soviets. The only son of a Chicago Cop, he never received his father's approval, was a high school misfit, who developed deep resentments. On the surface, Bob never made a big deal about anything, but he didn't like surprises and he didn't like being forgotten. He was smart and knew by developing a facade of normalcy - he played the boring man next door. Beneath his shell of normalcy he built his dual lives - "lawful" FBI agent and Soviet Spy; "faithful" husband and playboy; and "loyal Catholic" and aesthetic. He kept an arms length from reality so he could chase an exciting game of cat and mouse. He dropped clues - almost daring people to catch him or pay better attention.

What amazed me is that he could have gotten away with it. Why did he take the risk of reactivating? There was little chance of the FBI catching him as long as he stayed dormant. Hanssen's espionage has little to do with spying and much to do with emotional wants. He is an arrogant man harboring resentments and needed "respect" and friendships from an enemy that laughed at his naive requests for little money and yet giving them key intelligence - causing deaths of our agents - so they would pay attention and he could get retribution - telling everyone "I will show you!"

By blending in, being "common" - no one paid attention to him. The betrayal to this country is enormous.
Samardenob
Shannon and Blackman have written an interesting book about the career of Robert Philip Hanssen, the FBI "mole" who was arrested in February 2001 for spying for the KGB and its successors.
The authors' prose is clear and crisp, and in the end they settle for a "just the facts, ma'am" approach to the story. The book discusses Hanssen's childhood, education, career with the FBI, religious convictions, sexual fantasies, as well as the secrets he betrayed. Hanssen emerges as a study in contradictions: a vocal anti-Communist who spies for the Soviet Union; a devout Catholic who sells vital secrets to an atheist government; an apparent prude who patronizes a stripper and posts odd fantasies about his sex life on the Internet.
Hanssen betrayed everything that he claimed was important to him--his wife, his family, his friends, his religion, and his country. But the motive for his horrendous crimes, which he committed over the course of more than twenty years, is anything but clear. I would have loved it if this book had had more to say about the psychology of a spy, but it didn't. How can someone like Hanssen wake up and go to work every morning, knowing what he's risking and what he's done? Why doesn't the contradiction between his public image and his life cause him to break down? Is he able to compartmentalize things, so that the "good" Hanssen can live his life while the "bad" Hanssen" lives a lie? Is he just a sociopath, who doesn't really care about anyone or anything but himself? Maybe the FBI's own behavioral science unit will weigh in on this subject one day, but Shannon and Blackman don't venture down this dangerous trail. For better or worse, they describe "what" Hanssen is without really explaining "why" he is.
Another gap in the book is that, apart from a few generalizations, it doesn't address why the FBI and CIA seem so incompetent when it comes to catching spies (not that the KGB comes off looking a whole lot better). Perhaps the problem is that resources aren't allocated well, or that FBI and CIA personnel aren't trained to recognize the behavioral patterns of a spy--whatever the reason, the book largely leaves that problem to the reader's imagination.
The thing that should really strike you about this book is the realization that, for the last 25 years, there has always been at least one--usually several--moles who are busily selling vital American secrets. And those are just the ones that we know about. There is no obvious reason to think that there aren't just as many spies today as there have been in the last two decades. A book like this cries out for an explanation: what, if anything, are the FBI and the CIA doing to make sure that a disaster like Hanssen doesn't happen again?
Sardleem
I enjoyed this fast paced view into the life of a turncoat. Some interesting introductions to Opus Dei too. However, I found one glaring inconsistency that makes me wonder if something is left unsaid...
The fouth page into Chapter 17 (page 199 in my hardcover edition) the authors detail an investigation into a suspected spy at the FBI. Interviewing his children they "...seconded their father's assertion that his computer skills weren't remotely sufficient to have enabled him to encrypt messages to the KGB on diskettes."
In my reading of the book this occurs before October 1999. This is a full year earlier than the November 2000 acquisition of the KGB files that contained the encrypted diskettes. At the time of the interview the intelligence services did not have the details of Hanssen's betrayal. They supposedly knew nothing about the diskettes.
Did I miss something in the story? Or did the intelligence services know more about the betrayal before October 1999 than the book tells us?
Anyone else find this curious?
The Spy Next Door: The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Damaging FBI Agent in U.S. History download epub
Specific Groups
Author: Elaine Shannon
ISBN: 0316718211
Category: Biographies & Memoris
Subcategory: Specific Groups
Language: English
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; Stated 1st Edition edition (January 2002)
Pages: 288 pages