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Secret Formula: How Brilliant Marketing and Relentless Salesmanship Made Coca-Cola the Best-Known Product in the World download epub

by Frederick L. Allen


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Corporate Name: Coca-Cola Company History. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Corporate Name: Coca-Cola Company History. Rubrics: Soft drink industry Marketing. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

The story of Coca Cola is truly an amazing tale, and truly and American experience. Coca Cola has come to be seen as a symbol for our country around the world. This books tells you how that happened. One person found this helpful. The author allows us all of the inside information regarding it's beginnings including an real understanding of the times and culture. The story is full of diverse human personalities with all of their strengths and failings.

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and Relentless Salesmanship Made Coca-Cola the Best-Known Product in the World.

Secret Formula: How Brilliant Marketing and Relentless Salesmanship Made Coca-Cola the Best-Known Product in the World. From inside the book. HarperBusinesss, 1994 - Business & Economics - 500 pages. SECRET FORMULA: How Brilliant Marketing and Relentless Salesmanship Made Coca-Cola the Best-Known Product in the World.

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Items related to Secret Formula: How Brilliant Marketing and Relentless. Frederick Lewis Allen was born in Boston in 1890 and graduated from Harvard in 1912. Allen, Frederick L. ISBN 13: 9780887307515.

Frederick Allen’s fascinating book charts the growth of Coca-­Cola since its inception in 1886. Hence, they began an aggressive marketing campaign based solely on the trademark and branding, which yielded extraordinary results.

A history of the Coca-Cola corporation chronicles its successes and failures, including its recent breakthrough in the Third World, and provides a profile of the company's sixty-year chairman, Robert Woodruff. Reprint.

Comments: (7)

Swiang
An interesting tale in dire need of a thorough edit. Makes for an amusing read when the author feels the need to add [sic] to direct quotes, while also regurlarly spelling 'this' as 'his', 'its' as 'ifs', and missing full-stops. I am not a grammar stickler by any stretch, but the errors make for a more challenging read due to the need to interpret what the author may have meant. Lack of editing also means the story doesn't flow as well as it could, would love to read a revised version.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
A surprisingly interesting story of the history of the iconic brand and drink. As someone who doesn't even like Coke, I was leery of this book but it turned out to be an excellent read. As much saga as business history, the author traces the lives of the powerful men who shaped Coca-Cola over more than a century. The author brings these people to life, highlighting both their triumphs and failures. Focused heavily on the first 75+ years of the company, the book nonetheless shows the evolution of a minor drink in a minor city into a worldwide brand that has had major impacts in the growth of wealth in Atlanta.

The people are fascinating and flawed, the business has ups and downs and throughout most of the time, a couple of powerful families fight among themselves for power and control. It has all the makings of a good novel wrapped in a true story.
Unnis
Although written about 1995 and therefore does not follow Coke to today, this book is delightful. The history of Coke's evolution, marketing, "formula", and power struggles within the company make for great reading. The early history of Coke (although its founders insisted it always be referred to as Coca-Cola) and how the company grows and passes from owner to owner is an entertaining read.

Highly recommend it. Especially at its $1.99 price !
Garr
Length: Print, 510 pages; Audible, not yet available in audiobook format, but when it is I intend to be the first to purchase a copy.

This nonfiction book is targeted to people interested in business; history; marketing; even in political science and international relations.

What was the Amazon Rank on the date this review was published? 556,716.

Is this a book that I can read without having to read others first? Yes.

Are there a lot of typos/misspellings, grammatical errors or other editing failures? This is professionally edited, so, no, there are not many, if any, typographical or grammatical errors.

Is this a fast, easy read or is it more of a leisure read? At more than 500 pages, this is not a quick read per se, but it is as engrossing a page turner as any nonfiction book can be.

What sort of language does this writer use to amplify the points made? Plain spoken English with a minimal number of swear words. The only foul language, in fact, is the word dam with an ‘n’ at the end. I’m not being cute here. Amazon does not permit inclusion of foul language in reviews.

My biggest pleasure or disappointment was? That Secret Formula is not available as in audio. I would prefer Audible but any mp3 download or a CD version would be welcome.

I’ve included a small excerpt below, so readers can peruse the style of presentation utilized by the author.

What I find most striking is that the entrepreneur so benefitting from his sales revenue, resulting from a successful marketing campaign, felt so slighted at having to pay a tax that he knew, secretly, was not warranted by the law that he risked that entire marketing strategy in order to prove his point. Further, (mis)information that came out in that trial continues to be spread through rumors and gossip to the detriment of the company.

I greatly enjoyed the discussion of the potential of failure to Coca Cola’s international marketing efforts posed by France. This discussion is worthy of scrutiny by every political science student,

EXCERPT

Candler got his $ 29,502 back, but the cost was high. He believed the government’s true purpose was to punish him by learning the formula of Coca-Cola and exposing it to the would-be imitators of the world, who would then flood the market with cheap substitutes. Actually, there already were plenty of imitators at work, and they did not need the revelations in the courtroom to brew up syrup that closely resembled Coca-Cola. (If anything, the trial probably confused some of the imitators. At one point, testifying about the ingredients of the syrup, Candler cited “cassia,” the Chinese cinnamon, and the court stenographer misunderstood him and transcribed the word as “calcium.” Anyone trying to perfect a knock-off of Coca-Cola syrup by adding a pinch of calcium would have found himself at a dead end, and quite a tongue-curdling one at that.) No, the real injury to Candler and Coca-Cola came outside the courtroom, where a seismic shift in public opinion about cocaine was just starting to shake the ground.

Around the turn of the century, a scare over cocaine spread through the South, and as was true of so many other things in the region, the trigger was race. Local prohibition laws were turning large parts of the South dry, and in some instances blacks— like other poor people who couldn’t afford bootleg liquor— turned to cocaine as a substitute. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported in June 1900 that Negroes in the South were becoming addicted to sniffing cocaine, and in no time wild and wicked stories started making the rounds. A Colonel J. W. Watson of Georgia was quoted in the New York Tribune urging legal action against Coca-Cola, charging that “many of the horrible crimes committed in the Southern United States by the colored people can be traced directly to the cocaine habit.” There were reports that cocaine gave blacks— black men in particular—“ superhuman” powers, and some Southern police departments abandoned their .32-caliber service revolvers in favor of .38-caliber models that supposedly had the greater power necessary to stop blacks when they were cocaine-crazed.

As if that were not enough, a backlash erupted against kola as well. The promoters of kola had yet to give up their crusade to sell the American consumer on the wonders of their product (or to admit that its active principle was caffeine). In the 1890s, fine-tuning their pitch, they aimed their advertising at amateur athletes and the growing ranks of fitness buffs, especially those who were participating in the new craze of bicycling. Playing on racial mythology, some manufacturers brazenly asserted that kola— native to Africa— was the source of the physical strength of black people. Johnson & Johnson, for instance, launched a hard-sell campaign for its brand of kola extract, Kolafra. “Kolafra,” said a company pamphlet published in 1897 (with a woodcut picture of a strapping, bare-chested black man on the cover), “will assuage thirst under any and all conditions. African savages march for miles under a burning tropical sun, with heavy burdens on their heads, without water or food. They stop thirst and hunger by the free use of the wonderful Kolafra.”

Not surprisingly, the sensational imaginings that were published on behalf of kola fed the flames of racial alarm, too. One self-proclaimed medical expert warned that kola was a cardiac stimulant that blacks could tolerate but not “white-skinned peoples.”

It hardly mattered that Coca-Cola contained nothing but the merest trace of either drug named in its trademark. People were growing frightened. A doctor in Augusta, Georgia, said his city was filling up with “Coca-Cola fiends” whose cravings rivaled those of opium addicts. “Every ingredient [in Coca-Cola] is a poison,” the Wilson (N.C.) Daily News warned its readers, “and not long hence, each unhappy victim of this pernicious tipple, like the opium fiend of the East, may take his neighbor by the hand, and say, ‘Brother, what ailed thee, to seek so dire a cure?’”

Allen, Frederick (2015-10-27). Secret Formula (Kindle Locations 953-982). Open Road Media. Kindle Edition.

Bottom Line:

Although I initially felt the detail of discussion regarding the early history of Coca Cola was a bit difficult and cumbersome, as I got further into the book I came to appreciate why the author went into every nuance, twist, turn and flip flop by the creators, founders and entrepreneurs. Without such excruciating detail, I doubt the subtleties could have been sufficiently perceived.

An aura of mystery and secrecy can be an ally to an endeavor. But, it also can disappear with the wind is just an instant, just as demonstrated by the discussion of the court case and again by ‘New Coke.’ Of course, news headlines, even when they are largely negative, can prompt resurgence. Just as New Coke led to a new vitality of Coca Cola, so, too, have notorious headlines benefitted Donald Trump and, perhaps in the end, despite the naysayers, may well benefit the Republican Party.

Oh, one last comment. There are some fascinating photographs near the end of the book. It was heartwarming, for me, to learn that the head of Coca Cola opposed the radical segregationist Lester Maddox. Just a nice kernel of information I did not expect to learn.

Comments?
FRAY
The story of Coca Cola is truly an amazing tale, and truly and American experience. The author allows us all of the inside information regarding it's beginnings including an real understanding of the times and culture. The story is full of diverse human personalities with all of their strengths and failings. The weakness of the book comes in the middle when the minutia bogs it down. Sometimes less is more and that is likely the case here. But overall this is an interesting and entertaining read.
Nirad
If you like historical novels, this should be read. The author does a great job weaving the story of Coke from the beginning until the late 80s. There are several surprises and twists. The only issue, is it is a bit too detailed in parts.
Kazijora
A longish light read for an interesting light subject. Nothing earth shaking here although I guess the story in total is significant culturally and business history wise. I would recommend this for people who enjoy reading and have some level of interest in the subject.
Anyone who drinks any soft drink will find this fascinating. Coca Cola has come to be seen as a symbol for our country around the world. This books tells you how that happened
Secret Formula: How Brilliant Marketing and Relentless Salesmanship Made Coca-Cola the Best-Known Product in the World download epub
Biography & History
Author: Frederick L. Allen
ISBN: 0887307515
Category: Business & Money
Subcategory: Biography & History
Language: English
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks (July 5, 1995)
Pages: 544 pages