» » Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme

Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme download epub

by David Browne


Epub Book: 1349 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1759 kb.

This extreme (insiders much prefer the term & sports') demi-monde is the subject of David Browne's Amped: How Big Air .

This extreme (insiders much prefer the term & sports') demi-monde is the subject of David Browne's Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme. Thanks to the efforts of marketers to cash in on the adrenaline-fuelled wave of action sports, the word "extreme" has become overused and misconstrued to the point where it is essentially meaningless. Indeed, can a Slurpee or an underarm deodorant really be extreme?

David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly and author of Dream Brother: The Lives and .

David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly and author of Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley, which was a finalist for the Ralph J. Gleason Award. A former reporter for the New York Daily News, he has also written for the New York Times, Sports Illustrated, Rolling Stone, and New York, among other publications. He lives in Manhattan. This extreme (insiders much prefer the term & sports') demi-monde is the subject of David Browne's Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme.

Start by marking Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a. .Journalist David Browne interviews more than 100 athletes, pioneers, industry executives, manufacturers, and the adolescent amateurs at the heart of this movement

Start by marking Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Journalist David Browne interviews more than 100 athletes, pioneers, industry executives, manufacturers, and the adolescent amateurs at the heart of this movement.

The Internet Archive is a bargain, but we need your help. If you find our site useful, we ask you humbly, please chip in.

David Browne (journalist). Browne was born and raised in New Jersey and attended New York University, where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism, with a minor in music.

Электронная книга "Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme", David Browne. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. It's an insightful, entertaining, yet analytical look at the world of "extreme sports" and focuses primarily on skateboarding and snowboarding, but also including bicycle motocross (BMX) and freestyle motocross; two sports that are on the fringe of popular consciousness yet whose influence amongst teens is huge.

David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly. A former reporter for the New York Daily News, he has crontributed to Rolling Stone, the New York Times, New York magazine, Sports Illustrated, and other publications. He lives and very occasionally skateboards in Manhattan

David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly. He lives and very occasionally skateboards in Manhattan. He is the author of Dream Brother a highly acclaimed book which looked at the lives of Tim and Jeff Buckley. Country of Publication. Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.

Home David Browne Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars . David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly.

Home David Browne Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Entertainment Weekly music critic Browne (Dream Brother, 2001) takes an informative look at.

Entertainment Weekly music critic Browne (Dream Brother, 2001) takes an informative look at the uneasy interface of alternative sports and corporate America. How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme.

Meet the alternative American sports-skateboarding, snowboarding, BMX biking, and motocross-and the lifestyle, history, music, and million-dollar industry behind them.

Once a fringe underground culture, extreme sports are now the stuff of car commercials and Olympic competitions. How did they get there-and how does it feel to be in the middle of it all? The first comprehensive account of the rise, culture, and business of action sports, Amped plunges readers into the world of snowboarders, skateboarders, stunt bicyclists, and motorcycle riders. Readers will find themselves aboard a skateboarding bus tour with superstar Tony Hawk, behind the scenes at the X Games and snowboarding contests, at the sidelines witnessing the first-ever double backflip on a motorcycle, on the road with the Warped Tour, and in the offices of multinational corporations that have tapped into the vast amounts of money to be made from those who participate in and watch these nontraditional sports.

Based on interviews with more than one hundred athletes, pioneers, personalities, managers, business executives, extreme-rock musicians, and, most importantly, the adolescent amateurs who are the heart of this movement, Amped is not merely the story of an alternative world of sports now four decades old. It's the tale of a vast and flourishing culture that continues to reject old-fashioned stick-and-ball sports in favor of an individualistic form of expression. The story of extreme sports speaks volumes about Generations X and Y and their divergent views on life, creativity, gratification, and identity.


Comments: (7)

Ffyan
It's been over two decades since freelance writer Kief Hilsbery wrote "The kids are `amped,' and ready for `radical action.' - the lede for an Outside magazine story called "Clockwork Orange County" about the Santa Monica skate and surf scene that would later be documented in Stacey Peralta's award-winning Dogtown and Z-Boys.

This extreme (insiders much prefer the term `action sports') demi-monde is the subject of David Browne's Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars, and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme. It's an insightful, entertaining, yet analytical look at the world of "extreme sports" and focuses primarily on skateboarding and snowboarding, but also including bicycle motocross (BMX) and freestyle motocross; two sports that are on the fringe of popular consciousness yet whose influence amongst teens is huge.

Thanks to the efforts of marketers to cash in on the adrenaline-fuelled wave of action sports, the word "extreme" has become overused and misconstrued to the point where it is essentially meaningless. Indeed, can a Slurpee or an underarm deodorant really be extreme? The heart of the book is the sometimes chaotic, sometimes well-choreographed relationship between the athletes, brand names, music, video, computer games, and any of the vast array of consumer products that have been called as `extreme' in the past twenty years.

These sports boast one or two massive superstars such at skateboarding legend Tony Hawk, (whose net worth in endorsements rivals that of Michael Jordan) and the deceased snowboarder Craig Kelly. Below the elite, however, lies a massive pyramid of battered, bruised, and banged-up kids scratching out a subsistence living in a world not far removed from that of a punk-rock band. Except that playing music never hurt quite like this:

"For his lifelong devotion to the sport, (BMX), Thorne had paid a physical price. His knees, which had been operated on six times, had had screws inserted into them; screws in his ankles had only recently been removed. Another time, the metal peg of his bike shot up and into his crotch. "My testicle swelled up to the size of a grapefruit," He laughed at the memory. "But who cares? People say you'll regret it when you're older, but I think I'd regret it if I was a guy who went to work in a factory and didn't get out of Kansas City."

BMX and skateboarding pale behind the mind-boggling dirt bike stunts performed in the Crusty Demons of Dirt video series. The carnage in this sport is so brutal that one of the film companies is called Fleshwound Productions. Drawn perhaps by bloodlust, attendance at motocross and other action sports competitions rivals that of, say, NHL hockey, and the riders sometimes feel a bit like circus freaks. Money doesn't change everything, but certainly makes the injuries easier to bear.

So, regardless of the big bucks, just what kind of kids are out there abusing themselves in these sports, anyway? One of Amped's most fascinating subtexts deals with the fact that many of the kids playing these sports are far, far removed from the mainstream of American life; yet in an odd way, there spirit and daringness resemble those of early pioneer settlers; if not Horatio Alger stories. A one-time glue-sniffing Bob Burnquist fled the streets of Brazil for fame and fortune in a skateboarding career (a local aside - Burnquist's big break came at the 1992 Slam City Jam in Vancouver). A single mother works two jobs to get her son into freestyle motocross. Indeed, hang out at any suburban skate park and you'll see your share of single parents who definitely do not own second homes at Whistler.

One is really left wondering what is next for these sports, as the `degree of difficulty' gets ratcheted up to insane levels (for instance, performing a back flip on a motocross bike became old hat six months after Michael Metzger became the first person to do it). Browne doesn't really answer that question, but for now, he's fleshed out the mood and energy of the action sports scene as sure as Tony Hawk flying off the vert ramp and nailing a 540 indy.
PC-rider
I read this book several months ago, logged on to buy a copy as a gift, and was stunned to find a veritible "hit squad" of terrible reviews. I wouldn't bother to write in defense of an author I've never met (or even heard of before I bought his book)except that the negative pieces I've just read absolutely DO NOT reflect this book. It's an exciting inside view of athletes who engage in the extreme -- and very dangerous -- sports that have us non-athletes watching with dropped jaws. ("How can a human being DO that?!") AMPED is a terrific book about a world most of us have never, and could never, enter. I recommend it without hesitation!
Kison
This book is a badly written (very melodramatic, lots of inexplicable switches to the past tense, and choices in diction based apparently on using as many syllables as possible on every topic ... reads like an AP English essay) explanation by an outsider to outsiders of something that's essentially an insider phenomenon. Imagine a 300 page book by Bob Costas on punk rock. Humorous at first, then grating, and ultimately not useful for understanding what's actually going on.
Anen
This book just so happens to be written by a man with little knowledge on the sport of skateboarding. Let me explain. Browne traveled alongside a group of mainstream skateboarders taking notes on the business aspect of the mainstream skateboarder. In the book he explains how these rollerbladers make money through sponsorship and corporate ownership just like athletes in golf, baseball, nascar, etc. If you want a book on the business aspect of skateboarding this may be for you, but if you're looking for a book about the real sport of skateboarding then look elsewhere [...] his comments about the sport of rollerblading in an EXPN interview.)
Adoranin
This was a really great read. I rarely venture far from fictional books but I'm lucky I did this time. Amazingly insightful with a great insiders perspective on the evolution of extreme sports. Having been into extreme sports my entire life I can say this is a brilliant and honest representation of these great activities.

Having read some of the previous reviews I am genuinely confused. Although I can understand a difference of opinion this doesn't seem to be the case. Most of the reviews seem to be from people who haven't read the book so I am forced to conclude they have other motives. Either way I certainly suggest purchasing this book and making your own minds up, really is worth it.
Grokinos
And Browne has written a "Last Train to Memphis" for their ramped revolution. Overall, "Amped" is the story behind the ongoing individualization of heroism from the Army to Apple, from the Yankees to Tiger Woods, from entire countries in the Olympics to whoever's on the cover of Thrasher this month. Readers seeking "internal edginess" are advised to stick with Hawk's library, but those yearning to learn the inside scoop on how Xboarding evolved from the sidewalk to the boardwalk will find much to hammer here. Browne is comfortable with the parallels between polyrhythms and polyurethene, from the bus tours to the CD release schedules (the Playstation is the new record player) to the slavish imitation of hair and clothing styles by fans. But "Amped" is really the backstage study of the marketing machinery behind the 21st century's golf, only without balls and sticks (skateparks waste less space than 18 holes, too). Great job, dude.
Amped: How Big Air, Big Dollars and a New Generation Took Sports to the Extreme download epub
Industries
Author: David Browne
ISBN: 1582343179
Category: Business & Money
Subcategory: Industries
Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA (August 21, 2004)
Pages: 300 pages