» » Rich Like Them: My Door-to-Door Search for the Secrets of Wealth in America's Richest Neighborhoods

Rich Like Them: My Door-to-Door Search for the Secrets of Wealth in America's Richest Neighborhoods download epub

by Patrick Lawlor,Ryan D'Agostino


Epub Book: 1282 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1406 kb.

Ryan D'Agostino wanted to know how the extremely wealthy in America. In Rich Like Them, D'Agostino weaves together what he learned and organizes the text with maxims for achieving wealth, including "Never let pride get in the way of profit" and "When you fail miserably, rejoice. Filled with inspiring stories and straight-up advice, Rich Like Them is a lively and practical get-rich guide that any reader can follow.

Ryan D'Agostino wanted to know how the extremely wealthy in America got that way. So he asked.

Rich Like Them is not a self-help book, unless you're securely placed in upper-middle class or higher, and are financially secure. Of 500 houses in several cities across the top 100 richest zip codes, D'Agostino went door to door knocking/ringing doorbells to find out the secrets to everybody's wealth. He managed to snag 50 interviews. While I respect the goal of the book, the execution of it was flawed.

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Ryan D'Agostino wanted to know how the extremely wealthy in America got that way.

Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor. Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins. Ryan D'Agostino wanted to know how the extremely wealthy in America got that way.

book by Ryan D'Agostino.

Ryan D'Agostino wanted to know how the extremely wealthy in America got that way. So he asked. Knocking on 500 doors in twenty neighborhoods in the most affluent ZIP codes in America, D'Agostino met with fifty regular (but very rich) men and women who welcomed him in and shared some of their most difficult financial decisions, toughest setbacks, greatest strategies, most triumphant moments, and deepest insights into what it means to have money. D'Agostino covers a range of businesses, from real estate, flower selling, and credit card processing to art dealing, advertising, and even bookselling, gleaning lessons from which everyone can benefit.In Rich Like Them, D'Agostino weaves together what he learned and organizes the text with maxims for achieving wealth, including "Never let pride get in the way of profit" and "When you fail miserably, rejoice." Filled with inspiring stories and straight-up advice, Rich Like Them is a lively and practical get-rich guide that any reader can follow.

Comments: (7)

Wrathshaper
Rich Like Them is not a self-help book, unless you're securely placed in upper-middle class or higher, and are financially secure. In the author's door-to-door search to find the secrets of wealth is America (paraphrase of the subtitle), the true secret is "already be wealthy."

Of 500 houses in several cities across the top 100 richest zip codes, D'Agostino went door to door knocking/ringing doorbells to find out the secrets to everybody's wealth. He managed to snag 50 interviews.

While I respect the goal of the book, the execution of it was flawed. About a third of the advice on making it big would appeal to many of the readers of the book.

The people who made it big in this book were either already wealthy, married into wealth, started a business appealing to the wealthy, were from wealthy families, or made continual sacrifices to their families to get wealthy, by either burning the midnight oil ("Hey, it's Uncle Dad!"), or by continually relocating a family to keep getting better and better homes and by making a killing off the previous one. Oh, or you could work hard your entire life, scrimping and saving so that you could live luxuriously in your golden years (and by then, could you really enjoy it? What's the point of having an Olympic-sized swimming pool if all you can do is wade in the shallow end because of your arthritis?).

Sure, there were some innovators, like the author's friend who revolutionized the credit card/shop interface, but it seemed everybody else put everything in their lives to the side except for success (granted, a better goal than money), and all we see is the good: their giant house with a wonderful view of some body of water, but we don't see their neglected families (well, one of the guys, we see, doesn't have any furniture in his multi-million dollar home).

An interesting book if you liked the show Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, or Cribs, but not really any more helpful than listening to the financial talk radio shows on the AM ("act your wage" and so forth). About the only thing it brings to the table is to be a risk taker. Here, though, "risk" is a carefully calculated thing that would put you in the poor house if it fails.

Additionally, the author spends as much time interpolating his own agenda on getting rich as he does listening to the rich talk about their methods of getting rich. Oh, and he sickeningly describes every single overpriced meal he has and every lush hotel he visits as he does this project.

All in all, I wouldn't recommend this book unless you have loads of money lying around and would like some tips on how to invest it. Unless you're prepared to sacrifice and work really hard, this book will give you nothing more than a little warmth on the inside. That warmth is called "heartburn."
Frei
This is a very enjoyable read and moves right along, I got through it in two days. The author goes to rich zip codes and asks how the folks living there 'made it' to there. Their answers reveal that almost all the respondents made their money through hard work and application. Maybe they had a good idea, maybe they got lucky, but they never gave up trying. That is good advice for all of us but hardly a revelation. So what, I had fun tagging along with him.

Exactly one of the interviewees inherited his wealth. This person's goal was simply to preserve the family capital. "They got lucky in the sperm lottery," as one other guy said.

But having just finished Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the 21st Century" I can say that he did not interview truly wealthy people. Piketty shows that among the wealthiest 10% there is a strong division: The wealthiest 1% own over half the total wealth of the entire 10% and they don't live in subdivisions, either. More importantly, as total wealth increases, the fraction represented by income decreases. They don't earn it because they don't have to; they may have very little personal income.

So the author interviewed people who were at the bottom end of the top of the wealth scale. An indicator of this is the fact that 80-90% of the wealth of his subjects is represented by their homes, as shown in his tables. Another shows up in the age statistics for, say, Palm Beach where you see a lifetime's accumulated wealth but quite low income, comparatively.

Want to know if you've made it? You don't need a big house and all that stuff, but look at the ratio of your net worth and your income. In the zip-code tables this number is around 6. So if you've got a nice household income and you have 6-times that stashed, YOU MAY BE RICH! (But not necessarily wealthy.)
Beabandis
I was pleased that the author wasn't writing from an envious point of view, or one in which he thought the people should share their wealth with those less fortunate. He simply went to the communities revealed by the census to be the richest in the U.S. Once there he knocked on doors and asked the residents to tell him how they became rich. Amazingly, the people often times talked to him. (I'd have slammed the door in his face, but then I'm not "rich like them".) The thing that I took away from this book is that the very rich work dang hard to accumulate their wealth. Or if they inherited it, their benefactor worked dang hard. The profiles in this book very much reminded me of "The Millionaire Next Door" even though in that book most of the people profiled did not reside in mansions. Anyway, the politics of envy were not in play here which was refreshing. This book may never win the Pulitzer but it was a fun and interesting book to read.
Yozshugore
Great Idea for a book. I was anticipating its release with excitement. After completing it last week, I have to say that the opportunity was wasted.

He does what he says, but gets about an inch deep with the individuals, then he crams the few insights they had into whatever his outline's mantra is for that chapter (he puts words in their mouth to fit his format).

Also, the author is confused about what kind of writer he is. I mean, this book isn't Old Man and the Sea, so it seems out of place when he slips in and out of wild descriptive periods and clever similes that seem like he's been waiting to use them. They feel shoe-horned into descriptions.

But I don't want to just bash him here. Its an interesting read, but seems shallow for all the time he put in. He is also genuine about his interest in the subject.
Rich Like Them: My Door-to-Door Search for the Secrets of Wealth in America's Richest Neighborhoods download epub
Investing
Author: Patrick Lawlor,Ryan D'Agostino
ISBN: 1400109949
Category: Business & Money
Subcategory: Investing
Language: English
Publisher: Tantor Audio; Unabridged CD edition (January 19, 2009)