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Where Good Ideas Come from: A Natural History of Innovation. Steven Johnson download epub

by Steven Johnson


Epub Book: 1449 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1670 kb.

Steven Johnson's answers are revelatory as he identifies the seven key patterns behind genuine innovation, and . I first became acquainted with Where Good Ideas Come From through Steven Johnson's TED talk, which I highly recommend if you've got a spare 17 minutes.

Steven Johnson's answers are revelatory as he identifies the seven key patterns behind genuine innovation, and traces them across time and disciplines. From Darwin and Freud to the halls of Google and Apple, Johnson investigates the innovation hubs throughout modern time and pulls out the approaches and commonalities that seem to appear at moments of originality. In that talk - and the book - Johnson argues that most people are wrong when they imagine where new, innovative ideas come from.

What sparks our great ideas? Johnson breaks down the cultural, biological, and environmental fuel . The book is about the history of innovation.

A section on "slow hunches" captivates, taking readers from the FBI's work on 9/11 to Google's development of Google News. Over 200 innovations from the last 600 hundred years are referenced in making the case that over time there are emerging patterns that describe how innovative ideas are created, transmitted, and reinvented in the future.

About the natural history of innovation. Such books formed his repository of ideas and hunches, maturing and waiting to be connected to new ideas. Nov 27, 2013 · 11 min read. On an organizational level, the key to innovation and inspiration is a network which allows hunches to mature, scatter and combine with others openly. Consider natural reproduction: genes are passed on from parent to offspring, providing building instructions for how the offspring should develop. Without occasional mutations, meaning random errors in those instructions, evolution would have long ago come to a virtual standstill.

From Publishers, Web guru, and bestselling author of Everything Bad Is Good for You-delivers a sweeping look at innovation spanning nearly the whole of human history

From Publishers, Web guru, and bestselling author of Everything Bad Is Good for You-delivers a sweeping look at innovation spanning nearly the whole of human history. A section on slow hunches captivates, taking readers from the FBI's work on 9/11 to Google's development of Google News.

Where do good ideas come from? And what do we need to know and do to have more of them? .

Where do good ideas come from? And what do we need to know and do to have more of them? In Where Good Ideas Come From, Steven Johnson, one of our most innovative popular thinkers, explores the secrets of inspiration. Steven Johnson has spent twenty years immersed in creative industries, was active at the dawn of the internet and has a unique perspective that draws on his fluency in fields ranging from neurobiology to new media.

Nonprofit management books are a great way to keep learning The myth of innovation is that brilliant ideas leap fully formed from the minds of geniuses. In reality, most innovations are borne from rigor and discipline.

Nonprofit management books are a great way to keep learning. The myth of innovation is that brilliant ideas leap fully formed from the minds of geniuses.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -313) and index. Johnson addresses an urgent and universal question: What sparks the flash of brilliance? How does groundbreaking innovation happen?

Includes bibliographical references (p. Johnson addresses an urgent and universal question: What sparks the flash of brilliance? How does groundbreaking innovation happen? He provides the complete, exciting, and encouraging story of how the ideas are born that push careers, lives, society, and culture forward.

Where do good ideas come from? And what do we need to know and do to have more of them? In "Where Good Ideas Come From", Steven Johnson, one of our most innovative popular thinkers, explores the secrets of inspiration. Steven Johnson has spent twenty years immersed in creative industries, was active at the dawn of the internet and has a unique perspective that draws on his fluency in fields ranging from neurobiology to new media. Why have cities historically been such hubs of innovation? What do the printing press and Apple have in common? And what does this have to do with the creation and evolution of life itself? Johnson presents the answers to these questions and more in his infectious, culturally omnivoracious style, using examples from thinkers in a range of disciplines - from Charles Darwin to Tim Berners-Lee - to provide the complete, exciting, and encouraging story of inspiration. He identifies the five key principles to the genesis of great ideas, from the cultivation of hunches to the importance of connectivity and how best to make use of new technologies. Most exhilarating is his conclusion: with today's tools and environment, radical innovation is extraordinarily accessible to those who know how to cultivate it. By recognizing where and how patterns of creativity occur - whether within a school, a software platform or a social movement - he shows how we can make more of our ideas good ones.

Comments: (7)

Gavirgas
"Where Good Ideas come From" by Steven Johnson was given to me as a Christmas gift by someone who knows I love reading about how ideas originate and where common things we use today originated. It was not exactly what I expected, but still very good. It was less about individual case studies and more about ideas in general, and how a setting can effect ideas and implementation. A very interesting read and leaves you with a lot to take away from it. There is also an index of important inventions and when they were invented and by who in the back which was an interesting thing to look through as well.

Overall, the book was written at a very high level when it comes to Where Good Ideas Come From, which was an interesting approach with examples thrown in for good measure. I am very glad I received and read this book, even if it wasn't what I expected.

tl;dr An interesting read on the general nature of ideas, not case studies
Arador
As fluffy quasi-technical bestsellers go, this one was pretty good. Good enough, in fact, that after reading it I bought two additional copies which I used as thank you gifts in a professional setting. Pros: lovely meditative writing style, with lots of nature imagery. A small number of really good ideas about innovation, and many helpful examples. Cons: a little bit meta, a little bit strange. Specifically, he also discusses his own technique for managing a database of quotes and ideas; then you realize that the work itself is based on this collection, which accounts for some portions of the book that are a bit thin or lacking in through line. Or maybe more deeply explicated than what the point is worth. For some readers this might actually be a positive, an inspiration, a fresh or original element. Because I lean to denser, more technical works (George Eliot, anyone? (; ), to me it's a disadvantage. One ought to do better at hiding the machinations. It would be either a good beach read, for a technical person, or a striking source of inspiration, for a more artsy one. If you don't want to get it and read it, you could settle for looking up 'the adjacent possible'.
Cala
Almost finished with the book... maybe a chapter left. I was recommended this book during an entrepreneurship lecture series at my university. It really gave me some perspective as someone who wishes to get into the tech industry. I do agree with some of the other reviews, that this could have been summed up in a couple of pages. It also came across a bit dry during some of the chapters, but that may have been from the voice over (i bought the audible as I only have time to read while I drive... lol). However, I enjoyed hearing the anecdotal evidence and how he came to some of the conclusions for each chapter. If you are short on time, I recommend at least googling his TED talk or reading the main points of the book.
Malakelv
The book is about the history of innovation. Over 200 innovations from the last 600 hundred years are referenced in making the case that over time there are emerging patterns that describe how innovative ideas are created, transmitted, and reinvented in the future.

The lessons drawn from the past can be applied today and tomorrow. They include: 1) the notion that ideas are not a single thing, but more like a swarm, 2) good ideas are not conjured up out of thin air, but are built out of a collection of existing parts, the composition of which expands over time, 3) the way we collect, store, and use information can make us more creative and innovative, 4) pay attention to our hunches and cultivate them 5) pay attention to memories and dreams, they represent the creative chaos of our minds, 6) making mistakes forces us to explore, and 7) borrow, recycle, reinvent, and build upon the ideas of others.

The book reads more like a mystery as the author leads the reader through his analysis of events from the past. I particularly like the balanced view he provides. About the time you are ready to accept his premise, he challenges the very view that he has espoused. In that way, it is an energizing experience to follow his flow of thought. By the end of the book, it is ironic (or is it?) that he has immersed you into the very patterns that he described.

With the topic of innovation being so heavily in vogue today, I recommend this book to gain a fresh perspective from the annals of its history.
Gardall
I purchased this book after enjoying his earlier work so much, "How we Got To Now." And it did not disappoint. The earlier book gave me a greater appreciation for all the everyday stuff we take for granted (steel, glass, concrete, etc) and this one showed the power of cross-fertilization in solving problems. Printing was already being used but Gutenberg's idea of implementing the wine press used in Germany took it to another level.

He is not shy in contrasting this shared knowledge with the "silo-building" of the FBI that continues to fail our country by isolating key information from other agencies like the CIA. I remember reading after 9/11 that the failures of sharing vital information of national security was to be fixed by the creation of Homeland Security. Then the bombing at the Boston Marathon occurs and the investigation shows "silo-building" was again in play between the the CIA and the FBI,

At least the folks in the private sector understand the value of creative thinking.
Where Good Ideas Come from: A Natural History of Innovation. Steven Johnson download epub
Management & Leadership
Author: Steven Johnson
ISBN: 184614051X
Category: Business & Money
Subcategory: Management & Leadership
Language: English
Publisher: Allen Lane (October 1, 2010)
Pages: 336 pages