» » Strategy and the Fat Smoker

Strategy and the Fat Smoker download epub

by David Maister


Epub Book: 1110 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1494 kb.

The Fat Smoker Syndrome, the inability to do the things we know will help us accomplish our long-term goals, finds no better illustration than in the area of client relations.

The Fat Smoker Syndrome, the inability to do the things we know will help us accomplish our long-term goals, finds no better illustration than in the area of client relations. One of the hardest things for a professional to do is to turn down work and everyone has an excuse as to why they shouldn’t. We will learn why the refusal of work that is contrary to your strategy is essential to building a distinguished and special.

Managing, Strategy, Business: David Maister Live videocast.

moker/id250625382?i 1000015502387. Managing, Strategy, Business: David Maister Live videocast.

Start by marking Strategy and the Fat Smoker as Want to Read . In 18 chapters, Maister explores the fat smoker syndrome and how individuals, managers and organizations can overcome the temptations of the short-term and actually do what they already know is good for them.

Start by marking Strategy and the Fat Smoker as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In 18 chapters, Maister explores the fat smoker syndrome and how individuals, managers and organizations can overcome.

In 18 chapters, Maister explores the fat smoker syndrome and how individuals, managers and organizations can overcome the temptations of the short-term and actually do what they already know is good for them. Format Hardback 275 pages.

David Maister reminds us remorselessly of this painful truth and then . This book is really more like a collection of essays from David Maister. The "Fat Smoker" analogy is memorable, and it means that we don't always do what we know is good for us, even when it comes to running a business.

David Maister reminds us remorselessly of this painful truth and then, through anecdote, metaphor and case history, more than compensates by showing us how to turn empty aspiration into hard reality. Almost every essay is good enough to expand on and be turned into a regular business book.

We often (or even usually) know what we should be doing in both personal and professional life

We often (or even usually) know what we should be doing in both personal and professional life.

Books online: Strategy and the Fat Smoker: Doing What's Obvious But Not Easy, 2008, Fishpond. He is the author of the bestselling books Managing the Professional Service Firm, True Professionalism, The Trusted Advisor, Practice What You Preach and First Among Equals.

Not your everyday business book

Parts 1 and 2 are better explained in Maister's other books, such as those co-authored with Charles green, eg The Trusted Advisor. Part 3 (Management) is more useful. Why (Most) Training Is Useless is a concise explanation of why training is valuable only as a last step in organisational change. Not your everyday business book. David uses humor and real life examples to make the point that strategies can't be realized without a thoughtful change management plan.

Cover design for Strategy and the Fat Smoker by David Maister. Design the 33th book in the series published by Mann, Ivanov and Ferber. Release date: December 19 2007.

David Meister - a world guru in the field of firms providing professional services. A new book by David is based on its articles of recent years and the responses to questions from readers. In Russian came out kind of "Pentateuch" Meister "Management firm, providing professional services", "Counselor, trusted," "True professionalism", "Do what you preach" and "first among equals". It focuses on how to bridge the gap between what we know and what we do, how to achieve implementation of the strategy


Comments: (7)

Memuro
When I first saw this title, I was inclined to think that the author had intended the phrase "fat smoker" to be an oxymoron, because at least in my experience, there are very few smokers who are overweight. But after reading what Maister has to share in his most recent effort (see my reviews for some of his other texts, such as "Managing the Professional Service Firm", "First Among Equals: How to Manage a Group of Professionals", and "The Trusted Advisor"), I came to realize that he was describing himself.

In setting the stage, Maister notes in the first chapter that "many change efforts are based on the assumption that all you have to do is explain to people that their lives could be better, convince them that the goals are worth going for, and show them how to do it. But this assumption is patently false. If it were true, there would be no drug addicts, no alcoholics, or bad marriages in the world. 'Oh, I see, this behavior's not good for me? Ah well then, I'll stop, of course!' What nonsense!"

"And yet strategic plans and annual speeches by CEOs, managing partners, management consultants, and others continue to adopt this same useless structure: 'Look at how fabulous it would be if you were a fit, nonsmoking exerciser, David!' My usual response? 'True, but please shut up and go away.'" Later, the author follows up by drawing a parallel between the reasons for his sudden move to stop smoking, start exercising, and losing weight, and how change often finally comes about in the business world.

"We all know the main thing that works: a major crisis! If revenues drop off sharply, it's amazing how quickly businesses can act to deal with known inefficiencies and bad habits they could have tackled years ago." After discussing some of the aspects that are known about persuading people of change before the "heart attack" comes, the author brings up what will probably hit home to many business professionals, in professional services firms or elsewhere.

"Everyone in the organization has to decide if they want to try hard enough to sacrifice some of the present to achieve a better tomorrow. They may do so if they believe that the effort is serious. They definitely will not if they think those at the top are undecided or divided. Professional firms are afraid of this conclusion. They try to work around the skeptics, the nonbelievers, and the nonparticipants in their senior ranks, preferring to hold on to revenue volume rather than put together a senior team whose members are equally committed to reaching. That's fine, but you can't call it strategy."

As a consultant, one aspect that I appreciated about this book is that after an illustrious career and several popular books, Maister takes the risk that exposing some of his past and present faults will drive home the points that he attempts to make. And by and large, in my opinion he is successful doing so. In addition to the introductory chapters, I also especially enjoyed chapter 6 ("Do You Really Want Relationships?"), chapter 9 ("Tyrants, Energizers, and Cynics"), chapter 10 ("Why Most Training is Useless"), and chapter 19 ("Passion, People, and Principles").

This third chapter that I have listed, in my opinion, is one of the best chapters that Maister has ever written, and should be required reading for anyone already in the business world, or preparing to enter it, especially those interested in management. As he mentions in his introductory statements to this chapter, most companies use training as a business version of a "quick weight loss" program. "They hope that by training people in new things, they can quickly bring about behavioral changes among their employees. It almost never works." Why? Because training is an almost useless first step in a committed program for long-term change, especially when it is being used as a substitute for changes in managerial behavior.
Doulkree
This book is really more like a collection of essays from David Maister. Almost every essay is good enough to expand on and be turned into a regular business book. The author writes in a direct manner that gets right to the point, and his writing is full of usable information. This book may not even be 300 pages, but it will take you a long time to digest everything that he goes over.

In my opinion, the first three chapters are worth the price of the book alone (and the book is expensive everywhere). These three chapters center on doing what is obvious and not easy, and David has some real insight into the strategy problem. His overview of strategy is directed towards businesses, but can really be applied to everyone. If you find it hard to figure out what to do, or are still looking for the best plan to get things done, then pick up a copy of this book.

Some of my favorite quotes from the first chapter alone:

". . . knowing that something is good for us is not necessarily a predictor that we are going to do it."

"We know what to do, we know why we should do it, and we know how we should do it. Yet most businesses and individuals don't do what's good for them."

"The necessary outcome of strategic planning is not analytical insight but resolve."

"The primary reason we do not work at behaviors which we know we need to improve is that the rewards (and pleasure) are in the future; the disruption, discomfort and discipline needed to get there are immediate."

Highly recommended for businesses, churches, writers, and anyone else who needs to rethink strategy.
Era
Although Maister is writing for and about professional services companies, I think his ideas about strategy apply to almost any type of business. The "Fat Smoker" analogy is memorable, and it means that we don't always do what we know is good for us, even when it comes to running a business. In order to achieve great results, we have to break the old habits that have kept us in the same old ruts. Most of the book concentrates on ways we can develop the right attitude toward our own work, interact more effectively with co-workers, and build inspired, cohesive organizations. For some people, this book will be like preaching to the converted. But for business leaders and professionals who think the individual is more important that the organization, or who lead by intimidation, it will be a challenging read. Although Maister has an easy to read style, there is nothing easy about his ideas. He shares great wisdom obviously the result of long years grappling with organizational problems at a high level.
Usishele
Maister gets a lot right: appeal to an employee's own needs, not the greater corporate good(more work, less support makes for a bad rallying cry); embrace a relationship mentality in business deverlopment not a transaction on(as he bluntly puts it, go for romance and not a one night stand although many talk the first but do the second); understand that all can be rainmakers if you speak to their needs and intererests first with the money a nice side benefit, a consequence and not a motivator. His chapter on law firms is disheartening.He says that they are so different from other PSFs that they need their own chapter. His analysis:"(law firms are made up of)bands of warlords,each with his or her followers,ruling over a group of cowed citizens and acting in temporary alliance---until a better opportunity comes along." Beacuse of billing pressures, he says many partners hoard the work that needs to be pressed down. A final point, and one I disagree with---he seems to suggest that PSFs must only cater to the elite clients and there is no room for commodity work. Yet it is the commodity work which trains newer employees and, at times, fills in the dry periods between the more margin filled engagements.
Frey
The real kick butt book. Real actions. Not a bunch of lists.
Strategy and the Fat Smoker download epub
Management & Leadership
Author: David Maister
ISBN: 097984570X
Category: Business & Money
Subcategory: Management & Leadership
Publisher: The Spangle Press (2008)