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Momotaro and the Island of Ogres download epub

by Kano Naganobu,Stephanie Wada


Epub Book: 1730 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1829 kb.

Kano Naganobu (1775-1828), an official painter for the Shogun, depicted Momotaro's exploits on a pair of silk .

Kano Naganobu (1775-1828), an official painter for the Shogun, depicted Momotaro's exploits on a pair of silk handscrolls. Wada has retold Peach Boy's adventures to accompany reproductions of scenes from those scrolls. The result is a handsome book that will invite older children to see this beloved story through Japanese eyes. Along the way he picks up a large spotted dog, a monkey, and a pheasant who join him in his quest.

An exquisite handscroll painted by Kano Naganobu (1775-1828) contains one of the finest illustrated versions of the tale . The best part about this book is the original scroll artwork by Japanese artist Kano Naganobu (1775-1828). It's just beautiful, classic Japanese art that I just love.

An exquisite handscroll painted by Kano Naganobu (1775-1828) contains one of the finest illustrated versions of the tale known today. The illustrations are reproduced in their entirety as the story follows Momotaro's journey to the The amazing adventures of Momotaro, a boy found inside a peach and raised by an elderly couple, is one of Japan's most popular folktales. An exquisite handscroll painted by Kano Naganobu (1775-1828) contains one of the finest illustrated versions of the tale known today.

adapted by Stephanie Wada & illustrated by Kano Naganobu. The ogres aren’t impressed but not only does the quartet defeat them, Momotaro convinces them to mend their ways and return all the treasures they’ve stolen. The painting on silk repays close examination, and the text gracefully illuminates details in the images that might be overlooked. Lends itself wonderfully to reading aloud, too.

Wada, Stephanie; Naganobu, Kano, 1775-1828, il.

Wada, Stephanie; Naganobu, Kano, 1775-1828, ill. Publication date. Our local library has the book in the childrens' section. The illustrations and story are captivating. Don't miss an opportunity to see this.

The story follows Momotaro's journey to the terrifying Island of Ogres where, with the aid of some animal friends, he lays siege to the . A Japanese folktale, retold, with a postscript, by Stephanie Wada; paintings by Kano Naganobu

The story follows Momotaro's journey to the terrifying Island of Ogres where, with the aid of some animal friends, he lays siege to the demons' ill-gotten treasures. One of the first Japanese folktales to have been translated into English, Momotaro is a delightful and lively voyage of the imagination that can be enjoyed by young and old alike. A Japanese folktale, retold, with a postscript, by Stephanie Wada; paintings by Kano Naganobu. The amazing adventures of Momotaro, a boy found inside a peach and raised by an elderly couple, is one of Japan's most popular folktales.

One of the first Japanese folktales to have been translated into English, the story of Momotaro is a delightful and lively voyage of the imagination that can be enjoyed by young and old alike. A lengthy postscript to the tale looks at the tradition of illustrated folk stories in Japan, with examples of Momotaro pictures and related imagery in various forms of art, including painting and woodblock printing.

One of the first Japanese folktales to have been translated into English, the story of Momotaro is a delightful and lively voyage of the imagination that can be enjoyed by. .Country of Publication. A lengthy postscript to the tale looks at the tradition of illustrated folk stories in Japan, with examples ofMomotaro pictures and related imagery in various forms of art, including painting and woodblock printing.

View Stephanie Wada's profile. About Kano Naganobu (Illustrator) : Kano Naganobu is a published illustrator of children's books. View Kano Naganobu's profile.

One of Japan's best-loved children's stories brought to life by the extraordinary imagery of an early nineteenth-century handscroll.

The amazing adventures of Momotaro, a boy found inside a peach and raised by an elderly couple, is one of Japan's most popular folktales. An exquisite handscroll painted by Kano Naganobu (1775-1828) contains one of the finest illustrated versions of the tale known today. The illustrations are reproduced in their entirety as the story follows Momotaro's journey to the terrifying Island of Ogres. After befriending a dog, a monkey, and a pheasant, Momotaro crosses the sea with his new companions and lays siege to the demons' fearsome mountain fortress. The battle is a fierce one, but Momotaro and his friends prevail; they recover the demon's ill-gotten treasure and restore it to its rightful owners. One of the first Japanese folktales to have been translated into English, the story of Momotaro is a delightful and lively voyage of the imagination that can be enjoyed by young and old alike. A lengthy postscript to the tale looks at the tradition of illustrated folk stories in Japan, with examples of Momotaro pictures and related imagery in various forms of art, including painting and woodblock printing. The career of the artist, Kano Naganobu, and the artistic climate in which he worked are also reviewed.

Comments: (5)

Kirizan
This work was taken directly from the scrolls of Japan. The pages are covered in pictures where the narrative is along the sideline. It is apparent that this was to be a children's story. it tells an age old story of the "peach boy" found inside a peach by a couple who had no children and were very unhappy. Their boy grows up to be a great warrior who defeats the ogres on an island with the hep of his animal friends he meets along the way. The pictures are lovely. there is a nice explanation of the author and his prominence in Japan as well a discussion of the scrolls he produced.
It was fun for me to read as I had never heard of it before. And I enjoyed the artwork very much. As well as the legend. There is a kind of quiet sing-songy beat to the prose that matches nicely with the tone and message of the work.
Llathidan
What a beautiful book! I have always loved the story of Momotaro (Peach Boy) and the wonderful paintings by Kano Naganobu add another dimension to the story. It is just exquisite!
Samardenob
"Momotarô-san, Momotarô-san

Please give me one of those

Millet dumplings you're carryiing.

I'd gladly give one to you

If you'll go along with me

To conquer the ogres!"

Momotarô is a popular hero from Japanese folklore and the above verse is from a Japanse folk song about his famous exploits. His name literarly means Peach Tarô (Momo meaning Peach and Tarô meaning the eldest son, ergo Momotarô is often translated as Peach Boy). This is because the popular story of Momotarô, which dates from the Edo period, tells of this extraoridnary boy coming down to earth inside a large, golden peach. He is raised by his adoptive parents and grows to be stronger and wiser than his elders. Then when he is fifteen he sets off to battle the evil ogres that have been terrorizing and robbing the people of the region for such a long time.

"Momotarô and the Island of Ogres" is told by Stephanie Wada and follows the young hero's arrival and his upbringing by the old couple. To bring good to his parents and to other people, Momotarô decides to defeat the terrible ogres of Onigashima and begins his journey carrying some of the kibi-dango (millet dumplings) that are his favorite food. Along the way he picks up a large spotted dog, a monkey, and a pheasant who join him in his quest. The rest of the story is devoted to their journey to Onigahsima and the great battle in which they defeat the blue, red and gren ogres and return home in triumph.

As interesting as the story is the big treat here are the exquisite handscroll paintings by the Japanese artist Kano Naganobu (1775-1828) that illustrate the tale. Naganobu painted in ink, colors, and gold on silk. The book's postscript explains how the original image do not exist as separate paintings or scenes, but as a pair of handscrolls. The first tells Momotarô's story till our hero and his animal friends approach Onigashima, the second illustrates the battle between Momotarô's allies and the ogres through the return home. The postcript also highlights that Naganobu's illustrations are filled with various symbols of long life and good luck (e.g., water, the peach, crane, etc.). So be prepared to go back and look at the wonderful illustrations when you have read up on what all there is to find there so you can better appreciate them the second (or third or fourth) time around.
HeonIc
This is a classic Japanese legend, which is told with illustrations from an old scroll. The illustrations are wonderful, and the story is a lot of fun.
Nanecele
Story is traditional but illustrations used are spectacular!
Momotaro and the Island of Ogres download epub
Fairy Tales Folk Tales & Myths
Author: Kano Naganobu,Stephanie Wada
ISBN: 0807615528
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Fairy Tales Folk Tales & Myths
Language: English
Publisher: George Braziller Inc.; First Edition edition (May 17, 2005)
Pages: 47 pages