» » Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City

Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City download epub

by Albert Lorenz,Joy Schleh


Epub Book: 1595 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1956 kb.

The great mound city of Cahokia in what is now Illinois was one of the largest urban centers at its height (the early fourteenth century . I recently visited the Cahokia mounds with my 8-year-old son and purchased this book afterwards.

The great mound city of Cahokia in what is now Illinois was one of the largest urban centers at its height (the early fourteenth century, when it was bigger than London). Little Hawk and his family travel the Mississippi river with furs and other goods to trade in Cahokia. The two-month journey is not uneventful, but the arrival is even more exciting: the huge population, the buildings of clay with thatched roofs, the platform mounds. My son enjoyed the story, which I found to be much better than average for the type of book that it is (primarily educational).

Journey to Cahokia book. 1300, Little Hawk and his family take a trip to trade with the Indians of Cahokia, the great city along the Mississippi River.

1300, Little Hawk and his family take a trip to trade with the Indians of Cahokia, the great city along the Mississippi River. Joy Schleh, Albert Lorenz. Trojan Horse, The.

In ca. Good companion to a site visit or as a stand-alone. com User, November 26, 2009.

Albert Lorenz has written and illustrated four other children's books for Abrams

Albert Lorenz has written and illustrated four other children's books for Abrams. His illustrations appear in numerous magazines, including The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, and Architectural Record. Lorenz is a professor at Pratt Institute in New York.

A Boy’s Visit to the Great Mound City. by Albert Lorenz with Joy Schleh & illustrated by Albert Lorenz & Joy Schleh. Lorenz and Schleh mix color photos of surviving artifacts with painted scenes of smiling, buckskin-clad people (the men sporting elaborate tattoos and ’do’s), pulling back for an expanded view of the city’s entire layout as it has been reconstructed by archaeologists, and tracing Little Hawk’s trip on a map. Inspired by an exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago, this makes an absorbing cultural, if not literary, journey. afterword, bibliography) (Fiction.

Author: Albert Lorenz, Joy Schleh. Download Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City by Albert Lorenz, Joy Schleh free. Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City by Albert Lorenz, Joy Schleh fb2 DOWNLOAD FREE.

Find nearly any book by Joy Schleh. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Albert Lorenz, Joy Schleh. ISBN 9780810941106 (978-0-8109-4110-6) Hardcover, Harry N. Abrams, 1999. Find signed collectible books: 'Buried Blueprints: Maps and Sketches of Lost Worlds and Mysterious Places'.

Personal Name: Lorenz, Albert, 1941-. Publication, Distribution, et. New York Summary, et. In ca. 1300, Little Hawk and his family take a trip to trade with the Indians of Cahokia, the great city along the Mississippi River

Personal Name: Lorenz, Albert, 1941-. New York. Harry N. Abrams ; Chicago, Il. .In association with Art Institute of Chicago, (c)2004. Summary, et.

Louis, Missouri - The Cahokia Mounds: "One of the greatest cities of the world, Cahokia was larger than London was in AD Located . Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City: Albert Lorenz, Joy Schleh.

Louis, Missouri - The Cahokia Mounds: "One of the greatest cities of the world, Cahokia was larger than London was in AD Located fifteen minutes east of St. At its peak in the century, Cahokia was by far the largest native community in North America. Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City: In ca. Little Hawk and his family take a trip to trade with the Indians of Cahokia, the great city along the Mississippi River.

Journey to Cahokia: A Boy’s Visit to the Great Mound City by Albert Lorenz with Joy Schleh is a production of.

Journey to Cahokia: A Boy’s Visit to the Great Mound City by Albert Lorenz with Joy Schleh is a production of The Art Institute of Chicago. The book opens with a map and a note emphasizing the interconnectedness of long distance American Indian trade routes. This sets an academic tone and situates our story around 1300 CE. The story follows the family of a boy named Little Hawk as they journey from their small village by Lake Erie on a trading mission to the great city of Cahokia far to the west along the eastern shore of the Mississippi

Based on new research and archival images, a coming-of-age tale of a young Native American named Little Hawk shows how his family and other members of their tribe made a trading journey from his small village to the great mound city of Cahokia in the midwestern United States, long before the appearance of the Europeans.

Comments: (5)

Riavay
Really interesting history, with lovely illustrations. One page was a little gory/scary for my youngest (it shows the travelers being attacked by another tribe) but overall a really great book about American history that most Americans don't know about.
Auridora
I recently visited the Cahokia mounds with my 8-year-old son and purchased this book afterwards. My son enjoyed the story, which I found to be much better than average for the type of book that it is (primarily educational). I was very impressed with the illustrations, which are sufficiently detailed and engaging to hold a child's attention while being read to. We really enjoyed it.
Paxondano
I'm reviewing this book as a potential learning resource for a kid, which I think is fair, since the author specifically mentions a museum exhibit and includes photos of artifacts in the back.

Although the introduction says that Native Americans were present 2,000 years before Europeans "discovered" America, the timeline first shows a Native American event at 650 CE and then Leif Ericsson at 1000 CE. Everything else is general world history. It would've been more relevant to have more Native American history in the timeline, or if necessary, to have Native American events depicted on top of the timeline and world events on the bottom so that they can be seen side by side, because surely there was more than one Native American event of importance between 3000 BCE and 1500 CE (and "Cleopatra kills herself with the bite of an asp" doesn't quite seem to deserve a spot alongside "Teotihuacan Mexican civilization at its zenith").

Story-wise, it's okay. Not particularly imaginative, just serves as a vehicle to show Cahokia's grandeur, especially compared to the small village that the young boy and his family come from.

The story within a story (the legend about He-Who-Gets-Hit-With-Deer-Lungs) is kind of random and out of place. Nor did it add much to the rest of the story, other than to say that storytelling is how people passed the time on long trips. I felt that a better legend could have been chosen, if the author really wanted to incorporate one.

Mentioned lacrosse. As the game did derive from Native American traditions, it should have been given the Native Americans' actual name for it, which, as written in the book, isn't clear is the case (but I'm guessing not, since we like to bastardize everything). I thought that this bit of history ought to have been addressed in the back and even expanded on, especially since the Native Americans played the game for very different reasons than we do today. However, I was under the impression that it was more an Iroquois game, and that this story was a bit too far west for it to be accurate, not sure.

Page with artifacts in middle of story out of place; perhaps should have been placed with other artifacts / exhibit blurb in back. I understand WHY this might have been put here (right after the spread about trading with craftsmen), but it brought a halt to the actual story. Regarding the exhibit blurb at the end, it would also have been nice to see pictures of Cahokia itself, whether in its present-day form or in documentary photos of excavations, not just the artifacts after they were recovered and cleaned. Although the artifacts were well-photographed, I think additional photos would have made the relevance more immediate, as people are still trying to piece together and understand the significance of past cultures, not just, "Oh, yeah, we're done, here's the final product. Time to move on to the next dusty dig site and dead civilization."

Illustrations are the best part of this book; they're very colorful and vivid. My one qualm here would be that several of the characters look like each other; not just that several have body paint or mohawks (or whatever they're called), but that the ones who do have the same facial features as well. It doesn't help that these similar characters are grouped next to each other: mohawks with mohawks, body paint with body paint. This is most apparent on the page where the villagers are "exploring the city and trading with the craftsmen in the plaza." If the point is to lend authenticity, then using (and reusing) stock characters obviously detracts from that.

Characters are further anonymized because no tribe is ever mentioned. I don't recall names for landmarks like rivers, either, which I assume had names back in the day.

I would probably use this, especially if I can't find another story that weaves in day-to-day details (as opposed to folktales, which seem more prevalent among book offerings), but those holes do need to be patched.
Hanad
We've visited Aztalan, an archeological site similar to Cahokia, many times with our children, but it is really hard to picture what it must have been like when it was inhabited. To them, it has always been just a peaceful field with some strange looking hills and huge fence posts sticking out of the ground where the stockade once was. This book has brought the site to life for them. The story is engaging and easy to relate to. A wonderful book that helps explain a part of our history that is long gone.
Dorizius
We are planning a trip to the mounds of the Mississippi culture -- this book gives your kids a sense of what the civilization was like, and what structures may have been ON TOP of the mounds.

Very interesting; easy for kids to relate to. Some good activities, making masks, a cattail doll, crossword puzzle. Great glossary, includes words like: adze, awl, bastion, chert, equinox.
Journey to Cahokia: A Boy's Visit to the Great Mound City download epub
Growing Up & Facts of Life
Author: Albert Lorenz,Joy Schleh
ISBN: 0810950472
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Language: English
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams; First edition (November 1, 2004)
Pages: 32 pages