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Jethro Byrd, Fairy Child download epub

by Bob Graham


Epub Book: 1705 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1880 kb.

Jethro Byrde, Fairy Child Paperback – January 31, 2004.

Jethro Byrde, Fairy Child Paperback – January 31, 2004. by. Bob Graham (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. What a wonderful chance to invite all the Byrds for tea with Mommy and Daddy! But why, Annabelle wonders-as the fairies fiddle and sing and dance and whistle away among the cake crumbs-are she and Sam the only ones who can see them".

Jethro Byrd, Fairy Child. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press. Genre: Fantasy, Children's Picture Storybook. Good thing too, because Annabelle soon finds a young boy fairy, Jethro Byrd. Jethro Byrd introduces her to the entire Byrd fairy family. Annabelle helps the family and invites them to come through the fence to join her family for tea and fairy cakes.

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Jethro Byrd, fairy child. Graham, Bob. Publication date.

Robert Donald Graham, better known as Bob Graham (born 20 October 1942), is an Australian author and illustrator of picture books, primarily for very young children. Graham won the 2002 Kate Greenaway Medal from the British librarians, recognising the year's best-illustrated children's book published in the UK, for the picture book Jethro Byrd, Fairy Child (Walker Books), which he both wrote and illustrated. He donated the £5000 cash prize to refugees.

Jethro Byrde, Fairy Child. She finds a tiny fairy child, Jethro Byrde, and his family, who are on their way to the Fairy Travellers' Picnic. Select Format: Hardcover. And together, they spend a magical afternoon. ISBN13: 9781844284825.

Бобу Грэму сегодня 76 ле. Боб Грэм собрал самые известные национальные и международные награды в своей области, был номинирован на премию Андерсена, его "Jethro Byrd, Fairy Child" получила медаль Кейт Гринуэй, в общем, фигура в австралийской детской книге значимая. И книжки классные рисует, легко и задорно.

A light, sweet story of a little girl who finds a fairy family in her backyard-and a reminder to save time to notice the unseen world, which to children is often very real.

by Bob Graham & illustrated by Bob Graham. A light, sweet story of a little girl who finds a fairy family in her backyard-and a reminder to save time to notice the unseen world, which to children is often very real. Annabelle looks for fairies in the garden every day, while her little brother follows along and her parents go about their daily business. Annabelle’s father is completely unable to see the fairy family Annabelle finds, although he humors her. Her mother seems somewhat more receptive, but it’s hard to tell if Mom can actually see the little creatures.

She finds a tiny fairy child, Jethro Byrde, and his family, who are on their way to the Fairy Travellers’ Picnic. Annabelle’s dad says she’ll never find fairies among the cement and weeds. She finds a tiny fairy child, Jethro Byrde, and his family, who are on their way to the Fairy Travellers’ Picnic.

Find nearly any book by Bob Graham (page 3). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9781593156794 (978-1-59315-679-4) Softcover, Vanguard Press, 2011.

"Graham's not-too-subtle message about slowing down to enjoy the small wonders of life will resonate with children and adults alike." —PUBLISHERS WEEKLYAnnabelle's dad has little time for fairies, which he assures her she won't find in the cement and the weeds of their urban backyard. But Annabelle has lots of time, so she keeps looking, even under her baby brother, Sam. And one day she finds what she's looking for: a thumbsize fairy child named Jethro Byrd, whose family has made an awkward landing in a tiny ice-cream truck among some discarded bottles and cans. What a wonderful chance to invite all the Byrds for tea with Mommy and Daddy! But why, Annabelle wonders — as the fairies fiddle and sing and dance and whistle away among the cake crumbs — are she and Sam the only ones who can see them?

Comments: (6)

Kazigrel
Other reviewers already said wonderful things that I agree with very much. Appreciate the author having the parents not see fairies but play along just like other review said. The story is heartfelt and very sweet how the child can't go with the fairies and the child fairy can't stay. Love the parent fairies reason that his relatives will miss him if he isn't at the reunion. Exactly the type of answer I would give. There are MANY things I like about this book :) It's one of my favorites in my 2 year old"s collection. She likes it but not as much as some others. It's age range is 4-7 and I would agree with serious interest starting at age 4 but not ending at age 7. Older kids and adults will adore this book as well.
porosh
Graham, Bob. (2002). Jethro Byrd, Fairy Child. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press.

Genre: Fantasy, Children's Picture Storybook

Determined to find fairies, Annabelle searches for them outside in the weeds despite her father's nay saying. Good thing too, because Annabelle soon finds a young boy fairy, Jethro Byrd. Jethro Byrd introduces her to the entire Byrd fairy family. Annabelle helps the family and invites them to come through the fence to join her family for tea and fairy cakes. Annabelle's mother plays along but her father is too busy tapping away on his computer to participate in this magical moment. Annabelle's father is much too old and busy to be bothered by fairies, shares the Byrd family. Eventually, the fairies must leave and travel to a family reunion but they have something special for Annabelle that only she and her baby brother can see.

Graham is a favorite in my household. His stories are meaningful, magical, and offer feelings of mutuality. His characters, settings, and illustrations are real. For example, in this story, Annabelle's family lives in an apartment complex and she plays out on the concrete and in the weeds. Graham could have chosen a single-family house for the setting, but an apartment building with graffiti displayed on a nearby fence is reality for a large number of families and now that population of children can connect with Annabelle in this beautiful story. The message shared about Annabelle's workaholic father is a nice addition to the story because it emphasizes the genuine and pure nature of children. If fairies flew by my apartment window, I hope that I would see them :).
Anarus
I wanted to like it, but it's kind of judgmental against people who don't take time to look at the world around them. A little girl is always looking for fairies, but her parents tell her she'll never find them in "cement and weeds." But she does. And she invites them to tea. And her mother makes tea and cakes for them, even though she doesn't seem to be able to see them, kind of humoring her child. The father pretty much ignores her and the playing because he's on his keyboard, "Clickety click. Clickety click. Clickety click." And the fairies sing a song, and then they leave because they're going to a gathering of fairies. They give her a little watch and nobody else can see it.

It doesn't say that the mother can't see the fairies; it's only implied. But the father *definitely* can't see the fairies, because he is *not paying attention to his daughter.* He is a bad father, because he is not participating in her search for mythical creatures.

For more children's book reviews, see my website at drttmk dot com.
Vishura
From Thumbelina and Tinkerbell to The Littles, small folk have always been hugely appealing to the wee storybook crowd. And what could be more engaging to youngsters 4-to-7, than the idea of actually finding a fairy in their own backyard? When Annabelle discovers a fairy child named Jethro Byrd, she can't believe her eyes. Soon, Annabelle is joined by the rest of the musical Byrd family for an entertaining tea party. Her parents, however, are too busy or too unimaginative to see the fairies, but they humor their daughter who can't help but ponder the adventures she might have if she flew off with the Byrd family, leaving her own mundane home behind. Despite the oversized dimensions of this picture book, the story within is very small, offering a simple contemplation about slowing down to look at the little things around us.
Arith
This is the first review I've ever given on Amazon. I'm doing so because I was so surprised that this book had an avg. of only 3 stars (because of one barely-explained 1-star review out of the 3 reviews given), and felt it was so misleading that I should weigh in. This is a GREAT book. It teaches wonderful values (hospitality to strangers, taking time, patience, kindness) without being heavy-handed or saccharine. It talks about parents "not getting it," wihtout villifying the parents like some books. The art is beautiful too.
TheFresh
I felt like I came into this story already in progress. I had to check a few times to make sure we weren't missing pages at the front. Yeah, the pictures were nice but the story didn't flow very well.
Jethro Byrd, Fairy Child download epub
Growing Up & Facts of Life
Author: Bob Graham
ISBN: 076362697X
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Language: English
Publisher: Candlewick (May 10, 2005)
Pages: 32 pages