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I, Dred Scott: A Fictional Slave Narrative Based on the Life and Legal Precedent of Dred Scott download epub

by Shelia P. Moses


Epub Book: 1997 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1740 kb.

With a foreword by Dred Scott's great-grandson, Shelia P. Moses' stunning story chronicles Dred Scott's experiences as a slave, as a plaintiff in one of the most important legal cases in American history, and - at last - as a free man. Dred Scott's story is one of tremendous courage an. .

With a foreword by Dred Scott's great-grandson, Shelia P. Dred Scott's story is one of tremendous courage and fierce determination. His is a life that should be known by - and should inspire - all Americans. Poet, author, playwright, and producer Shelia P. Moses was raised the ninth of ten children on Rehobeth Road in Rich Square, North Carolina.

This book is about Dred Scott, a fictionalized biography told in the first person. On the cover of this book is a painting in which Dred Scott peers out at us with a somewhat vacant but dignified gaze

This book is about Dred Scott, a fictionalized biography told in the first person. Instead of learning about the Dred Scott Decision, readers learn about the slave named Dred Scott and his family. The first-person narrative is effective in drawing the reader into the story of one man, a slave, who had no rights under the Constitution of the United States. Author Shelia P. Moses uses dialect sparingly, which makes the narrative very readable for readers at all skill levels. On the cover of this book is a painting in which Dred Scott peers out at us with a somewhat vacant but dignified gaze. His eyes seem to be inviting us to pause and look back and try to glimpse into his soul.

This book is prefaced with a touching forward by a great-grandson of Dred Scott. Frederick Douglass autobiography would also be appropriate. I know Douglass should trump I Dred Scott but I'm going with this because of it's readability

This book is prefaced with a touching forward by a great-grandson of Dred Scott. He sets up the reader beautifully for Shelia Moses' attempt to humanize the man behind the landmark Supreme Court case of the 1850s which denied Scot's humanity and that of all blacks. I know Douglass should trump I Dred Scott but I'm going with this because of it's readability.

For on April 6, 1846, Dred Scott and his wife, Harriett - their ownership having changed hands several times during adulthood - took the dangerous and courageous step to sue for their freedom, entering into legal battles that would last for eleven years. During this time Dred Scott would need all the help and support he could get - from folks in the community all the way back to the people with whom he had been raised

Other authors: Bonnie Christensen (Illustrator), John A. Madison Jr (Foreword)

Other authors: Bonnie Christensen (Illustrator), John A. Madison Jr (Foreword). Having served his master in northern states, under the provisions of the Missouri compromise the slave Dred Scott may be eligible for emancipation, but legal obstacles stand in the way of his freedom.

I, Dred Scott : A Fictional Slave Narrative Based on the Life and Legal Precedent of Dred Scott. Born into slavery in Virginia in the late 1700s, Dred Scott had little to look forward to in life.

Dred Scott remained a slave until a new owner granted him his freedom shortly thereafter. Moses's fictional slave narrative is an important work that gives voice to a pivotal American, whose case edged the nation closer to war. However, Scott's narrative voice seems disembodied; there's too little character development and historical context to make Dred Scott seem like a real person. Much is told, but there's no drama in the telling.

Poet, author, playwright, and producer Shelia P. Moses was raised the ninth of ten children on Rehobeth Road in. She is the coauthor of Dick Gregory’s memoir, Callus on My Soul, as well as the award-winning author of several books for young readers: The Legend of Buddy Bush; The Return of Buddy Bush; I, Dred Scott: A Fictional Slave Narrative Based on the Life and Legal Precedent of Dred Scott; and The Baptism. Shelia lives in Atlanta, Georgia. Библиографические данные.

Fictional Slave Narrative Based on the Life and Legal Precedent of Dred Scott. Narrated by: Peter Jay Fernandez.

Born into slavery in Virginia in the late 1700s, Dred Scott had little to look forward to in life. But he was fortunate in two ways: His first owner was fairly kind to him, and he grew up with his owner's children, forming friendships that he would come to depend on years later. For on April 6, 1846, Dred Scott and his wife, Harriett -- their ownership having changed hands several times during adulthood -- took the dangerous and courageous step to sue for their freedom, entering into legal battles that would last for eleven years. During this time Dred Scott would need all the help and support he could get -- from folks in the community all the way back to the people with whom he had been raised. With a foreword by Dred Scott's great-grandson, Shelia P. Moses' stunning story chronicles Dred Scott's experiences as a slave, as a plaintiff in one of the most important legal cases in American history, and -- at last -- as a free man. Dred Scott's story is one of tremendous courage and fierce determination. His is a life that should be known by -- and should inspire -- all Americans.

Comments: (4)

HappyLove
This book is prefaced with a touching forward by a great-grandson [John Madison Jr.] of Dred Scott. He sets up the reader beautifully for Shelia Moses' attempt to humanize the man behind the landmark Supreme Court case of the 1850s which denied Scot's humanity and that of all blacks. I agreed with Mr. Madison's opening concern "How would Shelia Moses write about [Scott, his wife and children] and tell their story? It occurred to me later that how she did it was not as important as simply telling his story..."

This story is simply told, and short--eighty pages of fairly large type--and yet rich with detail and information. Those who aren't familiar with him will learn that Scott was a slave who was taken to several free-states by his master, an army doctor, in the 1840s. In the 1850s, sympathic lawyers argued in countless cases, leading all the way up to the Supreme Court, that Scott should be a free man. When Justice Taney and the Supreme Court ruled against Scott, the nation, already embroiled in the slavery debate, was further polarized as it raced toward war. Although told through the first-person voice, I found Dred Scott remained distant and unknown in this book. That's not exactly a criticism. Perhaps Ms. Moses trusts her readers enough to leave us some of the hard work of trying to understand another human being and make meaning of their life for ourselves. I deeply appreciated that she does not project herself into Scott or shackle him with modern sensibilities and agendas as so many writers of adolescent historical fiction do. Through Moses' pen the reader really does feel that are listening to Scott himself-who I imagine was an unassuming man not prone to deep, emotional disclosure.

As a middle school history teacher I am always searching for (and, sadly, rarely finding) quality material which will bring history alive for my students and help them get into someone else's head. I plan to use this book as an anchor for our study of slavery. I think Julius Lester's sledge-hammer compilation of true slaves rememberances, To Be A Slave, would compliment this work nicely. Frederick Douglass autobiography would also be appropriate. I know Douglass should trump I Dred Scott but I'm going with this because of it's readability.

On the cover of this book is a painting in which Dred Scott peers out at us with a somewhat vacant but dignified gaze. His eyes seem to be inviting us to pause and look back and try to glimpse into his soul. The book, like the painting, does that for me.

John Madison Jr's preface ends with the appeal, "I hope that people all over the world will read and love the characters to which Shelia Moses has given so much love. I hope you will finish this book knowing that Dred Scott was different from the court ruling that said he was only one-fourth of a man. He was my great-grandfather-and the start of our legacy."

**I'll add student's reactions to this review after I try it with them.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
Don't take the stars too seriously. This was a disappointment to me because I did not realize at buying it was fiction. The story is acceptable and is a good introduction to those who know nothing of Dred Scott. If you want history itself don't buy this.
Xanna
Great book! Very informative and helpful for my child's history class project.
Elizabeth
A good read to add to your other factual and fiction accounts when/if researching this era's history of the global slave trade.
I, Dred Scott: A Fictional Slave Narrative Based on the Life and Legal Precedent of Dred Scott download epub
Literature & Fiction
Author: Shelia P. Moses
ISBN: 0689859759
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books; First edition (January 1, 2005)
Pages: 112 pages