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I Am Mordred download epub

by Nancy Springer


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In I Am Mordred, one of the most fascinating and misunderstood heroes of Arthurian lore comes to life in an epic fantasy for Camelot fans.

In I Am Mordred, one of the most fascinating and misunderstood heroes of Arthurian lore comes to life in an epic fantasy for Camelot fans. Her strong female characters and bold recasting of traditional villains and heroes will draw the rapt attention of both sexes.

Nancy Springer’s prose is pretty and she brings a little piece of Arthurian Legend to life as Mordred gives his candid impressions of Arthur, Morgause, Morgan Le Fay, and others. In addition Springer explores such subjects as the nature of family, love, loneliness, original sin, self-determinism, fate and free will, honor, shame and guilt, and the function of the soul.

In her novel I Am Mordred, Nancy Springer flips the legend, brings the traitorous Mordred to tragic life, and makes him easy to sympathize with. When we meet Mordred he's a happy child being raised in a loving home by hard-working fisherfolk. His life changes when he's discovered and taken away.

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I Am Mordred is a fantasy novel written by Nancy Springer. It begins with King Arthur having fathered a child with his half-sister and placing all the newborn babies born on May 30 on a boat to drown, including his own son, Mordred

I Am Mordred is a fantasy novel written by Nancy Springer. It begins with King Arthur having fathered a child with his half-sister and placing all the newborn babies born on May 30 on a boat to drown, including his own son, Mordred. After a long, hard voyage through the cold waters of the ocean, only Mordred survives. A fisherman and his wife find and adopt him. When Mordred is about six years old, Nyneve, a sorceress, approaches and takes Mordred away to his biological mother.

I Am Mordred Nancy Springer. Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England. First published in the United States of America by Philomel Books

I Am Mordred Nancy Springer. I Am Morgan le Fay Nancy Springer. The Kestrel Lloyd Alexander. Mossflower Brian Jacques. First published in the United States of America by Philomel Books, a division of Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers, 2001. Published by Firebird, an imprint of Penguin Putnam In. 2002. I am Morgan Ie Fay : a tale from Camelot, Nancy Springer.

Mordred becomes a loner in Camelot and soon begins to hear voices in his head telling him to fulfill his phrophecy. Mordred, longing for Arthur's love and acceptance, would do almost anything to cheat his destiny, even selling his soul. I Am Mordred is one of the best works on Mordred I have ever seen.

1 Work in I Am Mordred - Nancy Springer. Navigation and Actions. A young girl gets lost in the woods and is saved by a mysterious raven. But this raven is no ordinary bird. He has a story to tell, and only she can make sure his voice is heard.

Nancy Springer is an American author of fantasy, young adult literature, mystery, and science fiction. Her novel Larque on the Wing won the Tiptree Award. She also received the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for her novels Toughing It and Looking for Jamie Bridger, in addition to receiving the Carolyn W. Field award for I am Mordred. A prolific author, she has written more than fifty books over a career that has spanned nearly four decades.

Her strong female characters and bold recasting of traditional villains and heroes will draw the rapt attention of both sexes.

Conceived in sin, Mordred knows he is fated to kill his father and king. The great wizard Merlin has prophesied that King Arthur will die at his hand. Can he prevent his destiny?

Comments: (7)

Cezel
This is an interesting take on Mordred from the Arthurian Legends. It is told in the first person. Mordred does not really die in the end, but then...does Arthur?

Mordred finds out who his father is (King Arthur) and that `fate' dictates he must kill him at the age of 27. He spends his youth trying to find a way to change his fate through journeys, quests and people. Don't forget magic!

Chapter 13 is very descriptive and imaginative. It sends us speeding to the end.

I liked Nyneve because she was strong and believed in true love. Mordred was an every day tween/teen trying to find his place in this world. A true coming-of-age tale.

This book is full of sorrow, but hope as well. It tells us to never give up hope until we give up our souls!
RUL
It's an interesting tale but I especially like it because its metaphors are so extraordinarily wonderful and different so if you appreciate and look for unusual metaphors like I do you will probably like it. The middle school students I subbed for the day I was perusing this book told me they enjoyed the book as well so its appeal spans quite an age range. I just received the book and have not finished it yet but it's been worth ordering.
Tansino
This book by Nancy Springer is also well-written, well thought-out. It gave me a whole new perspective on Mordred. Good writing.
Gathris
This was an amazingly written tale that kept me guessing and I couldn't put it down until I was finished. I've always loved tales written of Camelot, especially those in relation to Morgan Le Fay.
I would recommend this to anyone who loves a good read as well as an imaginative look at Camelot and the way fate cannot be escaped.
Auridora
Interesting to have a story of just Mordred and why he became what he became...
Mbon
Chroniclers from the Middle Ages, spare though the references are, generally treated Mordred with high regard as an honorable man. At worst he was viewed as a victim of fate and circumstance. Starting with "Le Morte d'Arthur" in 1485 and continuing more or less to the present day, Mordred was reduced to a black hearted villain, (or sometimes an angsty and petulant youth), and his name became synonymous with treason, if not patricide. It thus seems fitting that Nancy Springer has written an account of Mordred's life that reaches back to his earliest status and recasts him as a victim of circumstance, fate, and intrigue beyond his control. The further back you go in Arthur cycle scholarship the more conflicted and imperfect all of the main characters become, and it seems only fair that Mordred be allowed to plead his case.

That said, this is not a book of dry scholarship or academic argument. It is Mordred's tale, and I imagine should be judged as such. In that regard it is, to me, a fine tale. We start with the babe Mordred, set adrift by Arthur on the ocean to perish for the simple sin of being born, and for being foreseen by Merlin as Arthur's fated assassin. It was not unusual at the time for kings to have children by their sisters, so the fact that Mordred was the result of the union of Arthur and his half-sister, (at least in this telling; scholars differ), was less important than Merlin's foretelling. Since Merlin was considered either a genius wizard or a bumbling and pathetic charlatan or a devious plotter, (depending on who you read and the need of the moment), Mordred's tragic backstory as collateral damage from Merlin's scheming comes into clearer focus.

Springer brings Mordred to life in a sympathetic and remarkably engaging fashion. Torn from pillar to post, kept in the dark about his background and about the prophecies that marked him, the Mordred in this book is a kind and honorable young man with spine and wit. How he is turned and twisted and ultimately destroyed by fate and Arthur's indifference and distance makes for a thrilling tale. It is perhaps not by accident that the two most tragic figures in Arthur lore are Arthur himself and his son Mordred. In the final pages of this book their tragic relationship is brought to a head with high drama and grace.

Arthur lore and revisions aside, since all of these stories are tales of wonder, and can be woven, picked apart, and rewoven at will, I guess the main question is how has Springer done with all of this familiar material? I for one very much enjoyed and appreciated her portrayal of Mordred, and found new sympathy for his place in the Arthur canon. And, in any event, simply as a ripping tale of towering figures drawn from a lost era, this was a well written, tightly structured, fast paced, often touching, and always interesting story for anyone with a taste for Arthur tales.
Shazel
Originally posted at FanLit.

Almost all the modern stories derived from Arthurian legends focus on King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, Sir Lancelot, Sir Gawain, and Merlin. Why does Mordred, the man who eventually brings down the whole shebang, get such short shrift? There's plenty of source material, most notably Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae and Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Maybe it's that Mordred isn't very romantic. Or maybe we just don't like reading about people who are hard to root for.

In her novel I Am Mordred, Nancy Springer flips the legend, brings the traitorous Mordred to tragic life, and makes him easy to sympathize with. When we meet Mordred he's a happy child being raised in a loving home by hard-working fisherfolk. His life changes when he's discovered and taken away. Now he lives with a cold mother, a heavy burden (Merlin has publicly prophesied that Mordred will kill King Arthur) and a huge helping of guilt (King Arthur killed all the babies in the realm when he found out about Mordred's birth).

But Mordred doesn't want to kill anybody. He's a sensitive child who just wants to be loved and accepted by his scheming mother and the kind father who refuses to acknowledge him as son. Can Mordred find love? Can he defy his fate, or is he destined to fulfill it?

I Am Mordred is a short sad novel with a sympathetic anti-hero. Nancy Springer's prose is pretty and she brings a little piece of Arthurian Legend to life as Mordred gives his candid impressions of Arthur, Morgause, Morgan Le Fay, and others. In addition Springer explores such subjects as the nature of family, love, loneliness, original sin, self-determinism, fate and free will, honor, shame and guilt, and the function of the soul.

I Am Mordred is marketed to children aged 10 and up. As far as children's literature goes, the tale is rather somber and dark, dealing with incest, adultery, murder, and death, but it's tastefully done and none of it is graphic or glorifying. Nancy Springer succeeds in illustrating the lesson that we should always try to look at events from other people's perspectives. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend I Am Mordred to children, but keep in mind that it's dark and sad. Springer doesn't change the legendary ending.

I listened to Steven Crossley narrate Recorded Book's version of I Am Mordred. I enjoyed this production.
I Am Mordred download epub
Literature & Fiction
Author: Nancy Springer
ISBN: 0340749598
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Philomel (1998)
Pages: 192 pages