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Not the End of the World download epub

by Geraldine Mccaughrean


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Not the End of the World is a young adult novel by Geraldine McCaughrean. It retells the Biblical story of Noah's Ark. The main character is Noah's thirteen-year-old daughter, Timna.

Not the End of the World is a young adult novel by Geraldine McCaughrean. The story is also relayed from the points of view of the animals. The novel was first published in 2004 and was the winner of the 2004 Whitbread Children's Book Award.

This article is about Christopher Brookmyre's crime novel. For Geraldine McCaughrean's young adult novel, see Not the End of the World (young adult novel); for Kate Atkinson's book of short stories, see Not the End of the World (short story collection). Not the End of the World is Christopher Brookmyre's third novel, and the first not to feature Jack Parlabane, Christopher Brookmyre's most used character.

Geraldine McCaughrean. What was it really like when the heavens opened and the world drowned? Everyone knows the story of the Flood: The man called on by God to build an ark. The animals that came on board two by two. The.

Geraldine McCaughrean has taken one such narrative fable, Noah's flood, and told a different, darker, more imaginatively real . The sensory world engulfs us.

Geraldine McCaughrean has taken one such narrative fable, Noah's flood, and told a different, darker, more imaginatively real version of what this might have been like. Just as Grimm's fairy stories were prettified by Perrault, and Angela Carter unlayered a darker version of those stories, it is as if the Biblical version of those two by two animals and the sainted little family of Noah was an airbrushed story, without much real gristle and sinew, and McCaughrean has really imagined inside this story, and given a version which.

This adventure story asks what it was really like when the heavens opened and the world drowned - and what might have . Everyone knows the story of the Flood, the men God chose to survive, the animals that went in two by two.

This adventure story asks what it was really like when the heavens opened and the world drowned - and what might have happened in the days that followed. With a frighteningly zealous and single-minded Noah; Japheth and his young wife, Zillah, concerned for the welfare of the animals; the stowaway boy and baby found by Noah's daughter Timna; and the animals themselves, continuing to act as animals do, whatever their surroundings, this is an extremely compelling and at times very frightening story, beautifully written as ever by Geraldine McCaughrean. Geraldine McCaughrean. The inspiration for this book was the tradition of carved Jesse trees and stained glass windows used in medieval times to tell people Bible stories. Rusti is a Mongol warrior, fighting for the bloodthirsty Tamburlaine, Conqueror of the World. until he comes face-to-face with his first elephant. Kavi is the elephant's rider. Captured by the terrifying Mongol Horde, he fears for his life. Using her skills as a storyteller and her love of the Bible, the author has written a compelling story about the creation of a modern-day Jesse tree.

by Geraldine McCaughrean. Every teenager raised in a religious world, whether you're christian, jewish, or anything for that matter, should take a day to sit down and read this book

by Geraldine McCaughrean.

Praise for Geraldine McCaughrean How can you write about a bunch of boys stranded for months on a lonely . Surely nothing but the end of the world can explain why they have been abandoned to endure storms, starvation and terror.

Praise for Geraldine McCaughrean How can you write about a bunch of boys stranded for months on a lonely sea stac and make it surprising, tragic, funny and page-turningly exciting? Geraldine. And how can they survive, housed in stone and imprisoned on every side by the ocean? For Ailsa and Andy, who introduced me to Kilda. Praise for geraldine mccaughrean.

What was it really like when the heavens opened and the world drowned?

Everyone knows the story of the Flood: The man called on by God to build an ark. The animals that came on board two by two. The rain that fell for forty days and forty nights.

But what about the rest of the story? What about Noah's wife and daughters-in-law? And what if there was a daughter as well? How would it feel to head into the unknown, with only each other and all those animals? What would it be like to turn away friends and neighbors struggling in the water? Could all of it really be part of God's Plan -- the hunger and pain and fear?

Carnegie Medalist Geraldine McCaughrean transforms the familiar story into a provocative new tale that is told through the voices of Noah's family, and even the animals. At the heart is a daughter who questions her father when no one else will.


Comments: (7)

Kison
I had bought this book for my grand-daughter (13), but after reading it and giving it to her, I also recommended it to her mother and my friends. It is the story of Noah and his family during the Flood, told by his daughter. She asks the questions that we want to be able to ask; and, throughout the book, runs a thread of "mother knew best" that is delightfully impertinent to the men of the family. LRG
Knights from Bernin
A book like this makes a reader awed at our species amazing capacity to weave narrative fable, connecting events through patterns, giving them the shape of a story.

Geraldine McCaughrean has taken one such narrative fable, Noah's flood, and told a different, darker, more imaginatively real version of what this might have been like.

Just as Grimm's fairy stories were prettified by Perrault, and Angela Carter unlayered a darker version of those stories, it is as if the Biblical version of those two by two animals and the sainted little family of Noah was an airbrushed story, without much real gristle and sinew, and McCaughrean has really imagined inside this story, and given a version which feels both more mythical and more true.

Seen mainly through the eyes of a young daughter of Noah (funny that, as so often the Bible, written by men, neglects to record the females who were part of history and part of myth) this is textured and thoughtful, gruesome and funny. What might it have been like, all those two by two lions, worms, antelope, woodlice and dungbeetles cooped up together with a fanatical fundamentalist family believing itself to be the ones worthy of salvation, in a stinking hold of a ship? Did the sons who sorted the two by twos have the skills to ensure a male and a female of each - how DO you sex a tortoise? Think far less the nursery brightly coloured wooden two by two animals, clean and shiny, think of lice, fleas, blowflies et al. And less the sainted white bearded patriarch and his fine strapping named sons, Shem Ham and Japhet (and who were they to people the new world with, pray, why their wives, no more named than those two by two dungbeetles!), think more crazy end of world salvationists, Jonestown and the like.

McCaughrean is a childrens' writer, and this is a book for children. But like the best writers for children, she possesses a truthfulness in her understanding of, and memory of childhood. Most of us, as adults, forget how astonishingly thoughtful, truth-questing, pragmatic and imaginative childhood can be. Adults prettify the Grimm for their children. The best writers for children are also writing without patronising their readers, and what is suitable for the on-the-verge-of-puberty and beyond child, will also be suitable for an adult. Food here for thought for both child and adult.
AGAD
If you're looking for a slavish retelling of the Bible story about Noah and the Flood, this book isn't for you. If you're hoping to read a book about pretty rainbows and obedient doves, this isn't for you. But if you want a story that will grip you from the beginning to the end with a realistic cast of human and animal characters, a plot that will keep you on the edge of your chair, and a setting that is both horrific and fascinating, then you must read this masterful book. Timna, Noah's daughter, is the main character and hero. What? You've never heard of her? Was she just another invisible woman from the Bible? Timna herself realizes the truth: " `Shem, Ham, and Japheth: sons of Noah.' They are the only ones who will be mentioned a hundred years from now when people tell our story. I know I won't figure" (p. 2). You must read until the very end to discover Timna's fate.

Timna isn't the only narrator in this book. Her three brothers, their wives, her mother, and even some of the suffering animals tell the tale from their various points of view. Each voice is expressive; each voice has a different cadence and leads us to a deeper understanding of the catastrophe of the Flood. Interestingly, Noah does not tell his side of the story. The author portrays him as a religious fanatic, a monomaniac. She leads us to question whether he is as "blameless" as the Bible story would suggest. Almost all the people on the Ark are cast in an unflattering light. After all, Noah's family saved themselves while thousands of people drowned: "The water boiled with people. They were swimming, or clutching hold of logs, doors, cartwheels. Animals, too, were swimming among them--dogs and horses, cattle, goats. The sky was full of displaced birds, circling, circling, with nowhere to land" (p.11). However, the family's faults--large and small--make them seem more human. Not likeable, but human.

McCaughrean tells this story through powerful language and imagery. The sensory world engulfs us. "Below us, in the bowels of the ship, along its entire length, beasts squealed and shrieked and keened, scrabbling with claws and talons and tails for some purchase on the rolling world . . . . Huge mounds of hot dung slid about the decking, dislodging small creatures in their path" (p.6). What did we expect? That all these animals would quietly behave themselves during the forty days and nights and all the claustrophobic days thereafter while they waited for the waters to recede? The Flood was not a pretty sight. Touches of humor and irony occasionally relieve the tragic events. Timna states: "No shortage of jobs for any of us. The end of the world is a busy time if you mean to outlive it" (p. 5). Without giving away the ending, let us say that some small hope sustains the survivors (and the reader). And perhaps even a grain of faith. In our time of natural disasters--hurricanes, tidal waves, earthquakes--the ancient story of Noah and the flood hits uncomfortably close to home. Highly recommended for ages 12 - 18.

Reviewed by Anne Dublin
Not the End of the World download epub
Literature & Fiction
Author: Geraldine Mccaughrean
ISBN: 0060760303
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: HarperTeen (June 28, 2005)
Pages: 256 pages