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The Quest For Comfort: The Story of the Heidelberg Catechism download epub

by Evan Hughes,William Boekestein


Epub Book: 1527 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1574 kb.

In The Quest for Comfort, William Boekestein and Evan Hughes . The basic themes of the Heidelberg Catechism are as simple as the gospel it explains.

In The Quest for Comfort, William Boekestein and Evan Hughes combine history and art to retell the events that led to making the catechism. By sharing the stories of Caspar Olevianus, Zacharias Ursinus, and Frederick III and how they came to Heidelberg, children will gain a greater appreciation of the Christian faith as it is expressed in the Heidelberg Catechism. Altogether, the Heidelberg Catechism is more than a book, it is an institution, and will live as long as the Reformed Church. For this reason it remains the most influential of the several Reformation catechisms.

An Illustrated Children's book on the Heidelberg Catechism by Willliam. Pastor Boekestein introduces a year-long study into the basics of Christian doctrine. The study guide for this biblical study will be the Heidelberg Catechism (1563) The Quest for Comfort: The Story of the Heidelberg Catechism is with Evan Hughes. 21 July 2011 ·. Here's the trailer for our previous book, "Faithfulness under Fire: The Story of Guido de Bres. Thanks to Asher for the vocals

The Quest For Comfort book. But how did this catechism get written? In The Quest for Comfort, William Boekestein and Evan Hughes combine history and art to retell the events that led to making the catechism.

The Quest For Comfort book. By sharing the stories of Caspar Olevianus, Zacharias Ursinus, The Heidelberg Catechism has been taught to children for hundreds of years, encouraging them to seek Christ as their true source of comfort. But how did this catechism get written?

The Quest For Comfort book. But how did this catechism get written?

Simply written by William Boekestein and attractively illustrated by Evan Hughes, this little book tells the story of how the Heidelberg Catechism came . Third, Boekestein offers an appetizer to the Heidelberg Catechism.

Simply written by William Boekestein and attractively illustrated by Evan Hughes, this little book tells the story of how the Heidelberg Catechism came to be written. I won’t retell that story here: Boekestein does a wonderful job of it. I do want to note a few highlights from Boekestein’s narrative that are worth passing on to your family. He introduces young readers to the alliterative outline, Sin, Salvation, Service as a way for them to grasp the catechism’s basic structure. He also points out that this outline is most importantly an outline of the Scripture’s teaching about salvation.

The Quest For Comfort: The Story of the Heidelberg Catechism. Each book is illustrated by Evan Hughes and looks at the historical background to one of the confessional statements that make up the "Three Forms of Unity" treasured for centuries by the Reformed Church. The book is bright and colorful and provides a thorough backdrop to the Synod of Dort. The battle for Dutch independence and the Catholic inquisition are touched on, as well as the Protestant Reformation.

That's why I was glad to receive William Boekestein's newest release, The Quest for Comfort.

Years ago, as I was teaching Question 1 of the Heidelberg Catechism to my Sunday school class of first- through third-grade students, I wished for a book written specifically for their age about the rich history behind this important document, imparting the passion and urgency with which it was originally composed. That's why I was glad to receive William Boekestein's newest release, The Quest for Comfort Part.

The quest for comfort. the story of the Heidelberg catechism. by William Boekestein.

The Heidelberg Catechism has been taught to children for hundreds of years, encouraging them to seek Christ as their true source of comfort. But how did this catechism get written? In The Quest for Comfort, William Boekestein and Evan Hughes combine history and art to retell the events that led to making the catechism. By sharing the stories of Caspar Olevianus, Zacharias Ursinus, and Frederick III and how they came to Heidelberg, children will gain a greater appreciation of the Christian faith as it is expressed in the Heidelberg Catechism.

Comments: (7)

Black_Hawk_Down
This is a very good short history of how the Heidelberg Catechism came to be written and of the men who contributed to its publication. It is easy to read by a child, but also interesting to an adult.
Uafrmaine
Perfect
Fonceiah
Baptist do not tend to do catechisms. I don't know why. We should. One particular catechism that is well written and quite helpful (though perhaps with a few baptistic tweaks) is the Heidelberg Catechism. I knew very little about the catechism until I read The Good News We Almost Forgot by Kevin DeYoung. Reading through this made me consider going through such a catechism. As of now we are using Children's Desiring God material for weekly Bible studies. But that catechism remains in the back of my mind.

The Heidelberg Catechism and it's benefits were brought to forefront of my mind again when I received a copy of William Boekestein's latest children's book The Quest for Comfort. This children's book chronicles the lives of the three men instrumental in writing the Heidelberg Catechism: Caspar Olevianus, Zacharias Ursinus, and Frederick III.

You may be wondering who in their right mind would write a children's book about three guys hardly nobody has heard of that wrote a little book that few people use anymore. Boekestein offers a defense on the final page of the book saying, "this is no ordinary document, and the record of its birth is anything but boring". Boekestein then goes on to defend the importance of the Heidelberg Catechism.

Previously I had reviewed Boekestein's earlier children's book; Faithfulness Under Fire. In that review I noted that some of the material and some of the pictures might be a little too much for some children. In this particular book there is very little that might fall into that category. There is a picture of teenagers "drowning" but there isn't much else that would provide such a caution.

This book aims at teaching "us that deeply held beliefs and profound theological truths are worthy of the difficulties often faced defending them". Our children need to know that. They need to be brought up knowing that there are some truths that are so precious they are worth fighting and even dying for. This book helps children to discover that our "quest for comfort" often follows a road filled with suffering, but God is faithful and His gospel is worth it.

Should You Buy It?

I may encourage a few families in our church (myself included) to begin going through the Heidelberg Catechism with their children. If I do this I will certainly suggest that they read this children's book with their kids first. I know that my son would enjoy the book and would like to know the people behind the catechism that we are studying.
Blackbeard
Growing up, I was introduced to a wide assortment of "heroes of the Christian faith." But most of them were Americans -- pastors, or presidents, or missionaries -- and most were from the last two hundred years. As an adult, I came to a deeper appreciation of the Reformation, and I learned about a whole era of church history that was to some degree overlooked in my education. I now appreciate men like John Calvin and Martin Luther for their courage and tenacity, their faith and piety. As I continue to study the Reformation, it's lesser-known figures are also catching my eye. The work of men whom history has almost entirely forgotten, continues down to this day in such influential church documents as the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Heidelberg Catechism.

In a new book by William Boekestein, the story of the creation of the Heidelberg Catechism is told on a child's level. "The Quest for Comfort: The Story of The Heidelberg Catechism" traces the life stories of Caspar Olevianus, Zacharius Ursinus, and Frederick III. These three forgotten men, are the primary authors of the most enduring Reformation era Catechism: The Heidelberg Catechism.

The turbulent period of the Reformation and the fervent faith of these great men are captured well in this short book. Children will see preachers in jail, and Christians in exile -- and such realities are sure to encourage reflection and interaction with the story. The book also introduces the Heidelberg Catechism and would serve well as a book to be read alongside a family study of this important catechism.

Young readers will be enthralled by the names of these men, if not their tales. And the pages of this book are fully illustrated with a classic look and rich, full colors which will transport the reader to another age. The deluxe hardback binding will ensure the book stands up to the constant use young minds will make of it.

I would imagine that young readers in the 3rd - 6th grades would be able to read this independently. And children from Kindergarten and up will find the story fascinating. The color pictures make the book ideal even for younger children in a family devotions setting.

I wish as a child I had access to books like this that majored on the Reformation story, and the rich and varied history of the Christian faith. Author William Boekestein has written other tales for children, such as "Faithfulness Under Fire: The Story of Guido de Bres" (the author of the Belgic Confession). His simple and direct style is suitable for children and I hope he goes on to write many more wonderful tales such as these for children.

I highly recommend this book. I recommend purchasing this book as a special gift for a young person in your life. You'll be doing them a big favor and introducing them to the world of the Reformation.

Disclaimer: This book was provided by the author for review. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.
Ramsey`s
Here is the story, written for a child, of the creation of that great confession--the Heidelberg Catechism. I read it first for myself. I was impressed with the simplicity of the story, told with a gentle, fatherly tone. I mused on the fact that adults, too, can learn plenty from this simple retelling, and in turn explain the story to their children.
After I finished the story myself, I called for my 7 year old son. I wanted to see his reaction to the book. He loved the story. He loved the pictures. He understood everything. Then later, as we went to church I opened up the psalter hymnal and showed him the Heidelberg Catechism. His whole face lit up as he saw the names of the men he had already learned about--Casper Olevianus, Zacharius Ursinus and Fredrick III--in the introduction.
So I can say the most amazing things about this book all I want. The proof is in the reaction of my 7 year old son.
The Quest For Comfort: The Story of the Heidelberg Catechism download epub
Religions
Author: Evan Hughes,William Boekestein
ISBN: 1601781520
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Religions
Language: English
Publisher: Reformation Heritage Books (January 1, 2011)
Pages: 32 pages