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Life Story download epub

by Virginia Lee Burton


Epub Book: 1493 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1309 kb.

Virginia Lee Burton (1909-1968) was the talented author and illustrator of some of the most enduring books ever written for children.

Virginia Lee Burton (1909-1968) was the talented author and illustrator of some of the most enduring books ever written for children. The winner of the 1942 Caldecott Medal for THE LITTLE HOUSE, Burton's books include heroes and happy endings, lively illustrations, and a dash of nostalgia. She lived with her two sons, Aristides and Michael, and her husband George Demetrios, the sculptor, in a section of Gloucester, Massachusetts, called Folly Cove.

Virginia Lee Burton (August 30, 1909 – October 15, 1968), also known by her married name, Virginia Demetrios, was an American illustrator and children's book author

Virginia Lee Burton (August 30, 1909 – October 15, 1968), also known by her married name, Virginia Demetrios, was an American illustrator and children's book author. She wrote and illustrated seven children's books, including The Little House (1943), which won the Caldecott Medal. She also illustrated six books by other authors. Burton founded the textile collective, Folly Cove Designers, in Cape Ann, Massachusetts, which had numerous museum exhibitions

Sarah Larson writes about Virginia Lee Burton’s Life Story, a picture book that traces the beginning of the universe to your own neighborhood.

Sarah Larson writes about Virginia Lee Burton’s Life Story, a picture book that traces the beginning of the universe to your own neighborhood. In 1962, Virginia Lee Burton, the Gloucester, Massachusetts, writer and illustrator of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, and the Caldecott Award-winning The Little House, among others, published her final picture book, Life Story, a hardy, quiet work of genius that starts with the birth of the sun, proceeds through fires and ferns and glaciers, and ends. with you, the reader, living your life in the present day.

Virginia Lee Burton (1909-1968) was the talented author and illustrator of some of the most enduring books ever written for children

Virginia Lee Burton (1909-1968) was the talented author and illustrator of some of the most enduring books ever written for children.

Virginia Lee Burton won the Caldecott Medal in 1943 for her memorable picture book The Little House, a poignant story of a cute .

Virginia Lee Burton won the Caldecott Medal in 1943 for her memorable picture book The Little House, a poignant story of a cute country cottage that becomes engulfed by the city that grows up around it. The house has an expressive face of windows and doors, and even the feelings of a person, so she’s sad when she’s surrounded by the dirty, noisy city’s hustle and bustle: She missed the field of daisies, and the apple trees dancing in the moonlight. In comic-strip format, this action-packed western drama is complete with cattle rustling and kidnapping, a stampede, a holdup, and a thrilling chase.

Life Story is Virginia Lee Burton's seventh and final book, published in 1962. In a prologue and five acts, Burton traces the story of life on earth, beginning with the birth of the sun and the formation of our planet, and highlighting major periods of the paleozoic, mesozoic, cenozoic, and recent eras, before concluding with a section on the seasons of the year and times of the day. Illustrated with full-color paintings and black-and-white diagrams, this book helps young children place Life Story is Virginia Lee Burton's seventh and final book, published in 1962

Earth takes center stage in this updated version of Virginia Lee Burton’s 1962 classic Life Story.

Earth takes center stage in this updated version of Virginia Lee Burton’s 1962 classic Life Story  .

Katy and the Big Snow by Virginia Lee Burton.

A beautifully designed book set up as a play in five acts. The passage of time is shown visually on each page.

Earth takes centre stage in this updated version of Virginia Lee Burton's 1962 classic "Life Story". Told through five acts, Burton's art and text tell the history of earth from beginning to present day. Readers will gain an in-depth understanding of the planet's history and their leading roles in it today. The book has been updated with cutting-edge science, including up-to-the-minute information on fossil records and the geologic principles.

A beautifully designed book set up as a play in five acts. The passage of time is shown visually on each page.

Comments: (7)

Kegal
This edition is a little different from the one I knew as a kid, but the science is updated (such as modern period or epoch names) but Virginia Lee Burton's art is the same, as magical as is always was, and the updated text preserves the tone of her original. A real treat for Burton fans and geology/paleontology lovers alike, of all ages.
BlessСhild
This book is an unexpected hit with our kids. Beginning several billion years ago with the formation of the Earth and carrying through the major eras in the evolution of life and Earth, before finally zooming in on a modern house and its family. It's heavy on the science but the information is delivered through gorgeous illustrations with some whimsy as the narrator stands on stage and each is presented as an act in a play.

It's a bit of a struggle for me to read to them, but they ask for it so I've learned to summarize and keep things moving. Hopefully as they grow older the girls will get more out of this book.
Impala Frozen
I was searching for a really good book about dinosaurs for my almost 4 year old daughter who has just developed an interest in prehistoric creatures, when I stumbled onto this book.

We own other titles by Burton, The Little House, Katy and the Big Snow, and Calico the Wonder Horse, and love them all. But I think this book is the best. Why? Because, for my daughter, who demands daily readings, it has cracked the world of science wide open, spurring question after question about everything from meteors to the different types of rock, volcanoes, weather, the solar system, and on and on. Using the format of an engaging story, Burton has managed to touch on each of these subjects, and more, and pack so much information into a mere 80-pages. But it's not just rote information, it is a story, it is a play, and it is presented in such an entertaining way that it paves the path for a young child begin a journey of discovery that is integral to a life-long love and understanding of natural history and of the composition of the world around them.

Burton's story begins 'eons and eons ago' when 'our sun was born.' Each page is laid out with the left side containing a one-paragraph description of the period of time being sampled. This is paired with a tri-color visual narrative of what is happening, be it a 5-sketch demonstration of lava erupting from the Earth's core or the evolutionary progression of invertebrate organisms, plants, or animals. The drawings create almost a (slow) motion picture to accompany the words. The left page is dedicated to a full-color scene, set behind a stage, complete with drawn-aside red velvet curtain, and a curious little man examining the different goings-on. He, too, becomes more modern as the story progresses.

Something that I love about the format of this book is that the book begins by capturing snapshots of different periods of time that are very far apart; the first two documented time periods are 560,000,000 years apart. Mid-way through the book, the scenes are only 3,200,000 apart, and finally, by the end of the book, time slows down to 100 years, then 25, then 15, then each of the four seasons, then it is slowed to days, hours, and finally the final dark minutes before the sun rises and a new dawn is upon us. Early on, as time slows, Burton introduces her family into the story, and you find that this is her life story. On the final pages, as the story she has to tell draws to a close, Burton turns the story over to you, the reader, because it is your life story too. That last poetic touch is so beautiful, so perfect, that it leaves me in awe of the woman who wrote this book.

I don't think that this book could have been written, presented, and illustrated better. Every part just 'fits.' The ending, I believe in time, will help my child to understand where she fits into this story, and perhaps she, as I do, will feel that warm swell of love toward our home, our Earth, and all the life that has walked upon it, and gratitude that she has a place among such a brilliant history.
Cashoutmaster
Burton makes the origins of life into pure poetry. She beautifully blends non-fiction with prose and stunning artwork. We have incorporated this lovely book into our homeschool Pre-History studies and the kids act out the scenes if they like. More often than not, they are thrilled to try each scene out. A new favorite for us!
Aurizar
This is an awesome story that covers the the topics of evolution and prehistory. It has great illustrations and the concept is simplified enough for elementary children. I highly recommend it. It's a quality book with a quality subject and it's definitely worth it for you to have it.
Nenayally
Full of wisdom and information. This is a lovely work with wonderful art. The final page is profound and made me cry. But I want to add something that I found obvious but I can't find a review that mentions it so I will. This book points out to children that they are the end result of millions of years of evolution and because of that, the are worthwhile and have a destiny to fulfill. I wish someone had told me that when I was little and I hope that the children get the message and realize that their life is a gift and should be used to the fullest.
Malodred
I read this book almost 20 years ago in the first grade and was immediately hooked on natural history, dinosaurs, life sciences, and the like, not to mention storytelling itself. The illustrations are entrancing and the format--the history of life as a play in several acts on a world stage--is enthralling. It's highly informative, too, for a young reader (or even an old one), and it was one of the most memorable and entertaining "educational" books I read as a child.

Now out of college, I have recently repurchased it for nostalgia and read it again. It remains a wonderful work. Being from 1961, it is slightly dated in spots. For example, it says that there is no record of life 2 billion years ago, whereas today we have found lifeforms dating back twice that far. Also, the dinosaurs' extinction is attributed to a cooling climate, because at the time the meteor theory was not widely accepted.

But this of course is nitpicking. The ultimate point of the book is that it's an introduction to the history of our planet and everything on it, including us. The central message--that our own life stories fit into the grand tapestry of life's history--remains. This is a remarkable book, and paticularly if you have a young child, I highly recommend picking up a copy.
The illustrations are more muted than expected...but wonderful style/story.
Life Story download epub
Science Nature & How It Works
Author: Virginia Lee Burton
ISBN: 0395160308
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Nature & How It Works
Language: English
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (September 9, 1962)
Pages: 80 pages