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The Theology of the Gospel of Matthew (New Testament Theology) download epub

by J. Bradford Robinson,Ulrich Luz


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Luz states that Matthew rejects the Pharisees because the Pharisees had rejected his community without giving any verifiable proof of this happening

Series: New Testament Theology. Ulrich Luz. Translated by J. Bradford Robinson. Matthew's Gospel is the most significant Jewish-Christian document of the New Testament

Series: New Testament Theology. Recommend to librarian. Matthew's Gospel is the most significant Jewish-Christian document of the New Testament. For Matthew, the story of Jesus is the underlying tale of his own community, summoned from Israel by the living Jesus and now, following Israel's rejection, sent to the Gentiles. Matthew's Jesus story bears much the same relation to the Matthean community as does the Pentateuch to Israel, hence the profoundly Jewish basis of his theology.

Matthew's Gospel is the most significant Jewish-Christian document of the New Testament.

A New Testament Biblical Theology: The Unfolding of the Old Testament in the Ne. In this comprehensive exposition, a leading New Testament scholar explores the unfolding.

A New Testament Biblical Theology: The Unfolding of the Old Testament in the New. 1,072 Pages·2011·9. 79 MB·14,446 Downloads·New! In this comprehensive exposition, a leading New Testament scholar explores the unfolding. When the Moon Split: A biography of Prophet Muhammad. 57 MB·64,357 Downloads. Title: When the Moon Split: A biography of Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) Author: Safiur-Rahman al-Mubarkpuri Subj.

Publication: Cambridge, . Cambridge University Press, 1995Description: 166 . SBN: 0-521-43576-5. Dewey: 22. L979tSubject: Библия. Матфея - Критицический анализ, толкование, Bible. Matthew - Criticism, interpretation, etc Библия. Матфея- Теология, Bible. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. For Matthew, the story of Jesus is the underlying tale of his own community, from its initial convocation by the living Jesus to its espousal of the Gentile mission following Israel's rejection. Particular attention is drawn to Matthew's theology of judgment by works, an idea at once challenging and burdensome to Christians today and a direct outgrowth of the traumatic cleavage between the Matthean community and the Israelite majority. The Theology of the Gospel of Matthew (9780521435765) by Ulrich Luz.

HowardInterVarsity, Downers Grove, 2004. Frank J. Matera - 2006 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 60 (1):84-86.

The significance of the new testament canon Matthew, Mark, and Luke structure the ministry of Jesus according to a general geographic sequence: ministry in Galilee, withdrawal to the North (with Peter’s.

The significance of the new testament canon. Matthew, Mark, and Luke structure the ministry of Jesus according to a general geographic sequence: ministry in Galilee, withdrawal to the North (with Peter’s confession as a climax and point of transition), ministry in Judea and Perea while Jesus is on his way to Jerusalem (less clear in Luke), and final ministry in Jerusalem.

This thought-provoking book examines the origins of the New Testament: the test of canonicity in the early days of. .

This thought-provoking book examines the origins of the New Testament: the test of canonicity in the early days of the church, the process by which the canon was formed, and the close relationship between the content of the gospel and the concept of an apostle. Faith's Framework shows how, rather than being a dead part of church history, the question of the canon is a live question for Christians today, especially as they re-examine their own faith in the light of the original New Testament writings.

the New Testament 123. 9 Women in Early Christianity: the Challenge t. The theology of the New Testament’ has a potentially central, if con-

the New Testament 123. 9 Women in Early Christianity: the Challenge to. a New Testament Theology 13. 15 The Gospel of John and New Testament Theology 248. Francis Watson. 16 The Theology of the Cross and the Quest for. a Doctrinal Norm 263. Michael Wolter. The theology of the New Testament’ has a potentially central, if con-. tested, position in the discipline, as Bob Morgan has demonstrated in a. lifetime of immersion in the subject. The debate over its character, and. what exactly is – or should be – constituted by a ‘theology of the New. Testament’, can indeed go to the very heart of the nature of theology and.

Matthew's Gospel is the most significant Jewish-Christian document of the New Testament. Ulrich Luz both outlines and elucidates the story told in the Gospel, emphasizing its focal points: the Sermon on the Mount, the miracles, the renunciation of possessions, and particularly the theology of judgment by works, an idea that represents both a challenge, in its quest for a church set apart from non-Christians by deeds alone, and a burden, through its traumatic origin in the breach between Matthew's community and the Israelite majority.

Comments: (4)

Kulafyn
Ulrich Luz gives full weight to the idea that Matthew wrote his Gospel as a *story* of Jesus, with the purpose of conveying a theological message to its intended readers. The story has a developing plot, inviting us to read it as a whole, not in isolated parts. Luz traces the story and its implications from beginning to end, rather than attempt to organize it systematically by topic. Here are a few glimpses into the study:

Luz does not apply the categories of literary criticism (implied author, narrator, etc.), but his narrative approach accommodates theological statements such as, "The Immanuel motif shows that Matthew's Christology is narrative in character. The presence of God can only be related and testified, not captured in concepts." And, "[I]n the *story* of the man Jesus, God *acts* [author's emphases]."

Reading the Gospel in its entirety uncovers signals, key words and other textual clues that enable Luz to propose, for example, a history of the Matthean community, a hypothetical outline whose "function is to kindle the historical imagination and elicit further outlines." Matthew's story, he tells us, is "inclusive", meaning the experiences of the historical Jesus as narrated in the Gospel mirror and include the experiences of the contemporary community. This applies not only to the narrative as a whole, but also to its particular elements, such as the miracle stories: Luz cites the calming of the storm (8:18-27) as a story that in itself is inclusive. "Its concern is not only the historical Jesus, but at the same time the present 'Lord', who will accompany the community to the end of time."

Although Luz conforms to the sequence of Matthew's story, he does include from time to time a "systematic" section. An excellent example occurs in Chapter 4, where he interpolates a section on the Son of David, the Messiah, as a worker of miracles accepted by the simple people but rejected by the Pharisees. Yet even here, he concludes by pointing out that this serves to advance the story's plot of conflict with Israel.

Among the distinguishing marks of Matthew's theology is the theme of judgment, which makes its first appearance in the Sermon on the Mount, then threads its way through the rest of the narrative. Although it is tempered by God's mercy and generosity, Luz has no inhibitions calling it a judgment of works. "Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down." To his credit, Luz does not try to harmonize Matthew with Paul. He does not claim that it was a matter of "by works" vs. "by grace alone," yet senses "a profound tension ... perhaps even an abyss" between the writings of these two figures of the New Testament. Other scholars have written of "diversity within the unity" of the NT.

Luz is compelling in his discussions of mission and discipleship, callings that are of the essence of Matthew's community. He also examines the parables ("they ask to be lived, not to be grasped by the intellect"), the Church (in Matthew's understanding, the disciples with whom his community identifies), eschatology, turning to the Gentiles and other topics as they occur in the narrative. The final chapter includes sections on "Matthew and Jesus", "Matthew and Paul", "Matthew and Church History", and "Matthew and Christians Today". The book is thought provoking and worthy of its eminent author, but rather brief. Luz discusses some of the topics in more detail in his excellent collection of papers, Studies In Matthew.
Forcestalker
Unexpectedly good content. I had no previous expectations when getting the book and knew nothing about the author. I have many other commentaries from many authors. I think Luz's analyses and observations are excellent. Logical and well thought out.
Hucama
Luz' produces his theology of Matthew via examination of the "story" of Matthew. His first chapter explains the overall coherency of Matthew focusing on Matthew's use of signals, prophecies, key words, repetition, and inclusions as story-telling technique. He suggests how Matthew used the sources available to him - Mark, Q, and a "sayings source" and he speaks about the Matthean community. Next he identifies the Prologue (1:1-4:22) which sets up who Jesus is by His birth story, then a developing Christology through fulfillment of the scriptures.

chapter 3 does a good job on the Sermon on the Mount and chapter 4 deals with the inclusiveness that Jesus intended but the conflict that Jesus found with Israel. Luz believes that Matthew creates this because it is really his community who is in conflict with Jewish leaders causing Matthew to lose coherency. 12:1-16:20 covers the origin of the discipleship community caused by Israel's rejection of Jesus and the disciples' acceptance of Christ. In chapter 6, Luz sees Matthew describing discipleship life including suffering, self-denial, and new rules.

Chapter 7 focuses on judgment that will go badly for the nation of Israel including its leaders, with whom Luz assumes Matthew is already at conflict. Luz determines Matthew's theology of the Passion Week reemphasizes the rejection of Israel (chapter 8) and adds some final concluding thoughts in chapter 9.

Luz interprets Matthew in light of Matthew's supposed community and its rejection by Jewish leadership, often overstating what is in Matthew's mind (105, 123, 142-144). Luz states that Matthew rejects the Pharisees because the Pharisees had rejected his community without giving any verifiable proof of this happening.

Luz has good theology throughout - on the Sermon on the Mount, on the importance of prayer, discipleship, and when he points out that obedience is the key to understanding Matthew. However, his theology is not up to this standard on many other occasions. His teaching about righteousness of works has Christians at the judgment, foreshadowing his contradictory comparison of Matthew and Paul. He puts Paul's concept of grace at odds with Matthew's depiction of righteousness by works, concluding that the two have a theological "abyss" between them. Yet, immediately following, he offers 5 reasons why they are not really that far apart! So, is there an abyss or are they not really that far apart?

He presents controversial ideas with a sense of certainty without always giving adequate support, such as, "It is highly conceivable that there were many houses churches in Antioch with little contact between them," (147) in order to support his theory that Matthew had little contact with Paul. He is unable to offer any data to support this theory.

I like his thought provoking and well written approach to narrative theology. This is clearly a major strength of the book. It is too bad that he was unable to sufficiently support all of his ideas. The fact that much of his theology is based on his sure understanding of what constituted the Matthean community is unfortunate because he seems to be able to say much about this reconstructed community, one he created based on Matthew's writing. Obviously, this becomes a circular argument. Beyond this though, the book is definitely worth the read. It is a solid theological approach by a serious theologian.
Tebei
A much better treatment than this series' respective book on Mark, this book on Matthew succeeds in grasping an essence of Matthew's thought-patterns and setting.
While most books in this series have a very contrived structure - introduction and backgroud, theology of, book and NT, book and today - Luz instead presents Matthew's theology in the context of its plot, realizing the necessity of integrating the story to the theology. As becomes clear, Matthew's focus is on discipleship and what it means to be a true disciple of Jesus (according to him). The grapplings of Jewish Christians with the Gentile mission, of observance to and relevance of the law for their life, and the importance of "works" are all themes elucidated clearly by Luz.
In the end, Luz tackles the problem of relating Matthew's works orientation to Paul's justification by faith in more than an adequate manner, although any such "solution" is always incomplete.
Overall, the book is well written and thought out and clearly followed. The only difficulty with the book was sometimes trying to follow the somewhat awkward wording of the author as it has been translated from German into English. But don't let this dissuade you - this book is worth buying.
The Theology of the Gospel of Matthew (New Testament Theology) download epub
Bible Study & Reference
Author: J. Bradford Robinson,Ulrich Luz
ISBN: 0521435765
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (June 30, 1995)
Pages: 182 pages