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Three Views on the Rapture: Pretribulation, Prewrath, or Posttribulation (Counterpoints: Bible and Theology) download epub

by Craig A. Blaising,Douglas J. Moo,Stanley N. Gundry,Alan Hultberg


Epub Book: 1395 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1340 kb.

The book is composed of three authors (Craig Blaising, Alan Hultberg, and Douglas Moo), one of them returning . Craig represents Pre-trib, Hultberg Pre-wrath, and Moo Post-trib

The book is composed of three authors (Craig Blaising, Alan Hultberg, and Douglas Moo), one of them returning from the previous book of three views (Pre, Mid, and Post). Craig represents Pre-trib, Hultberg Pre-wrath, and Moo Post-trib. All authors had a significant amount of room to flesh out their views and positions, then the other authors brought out their objects in a short response, and then (different from all over perspectives books I have read) the original author is allowed a rejoinder (a response to the criticism received). 1) Layout/Format – These books are designed perfectly.

Series: Counterpoints: Bible & Theology Categories: End Times/Eschatology. The rapture, or the belief that, at some point, Jesus’ living followers will join him forever while others do not, is an important but contested doctrine among evangelicals. Scholars generally hold one of three perspectives on the timing of and circumstances surrounding the rapture, all of which are presented in Three Views on the Rapture. The recent prominence of a Pre-Wrath understanding of the rapture calls for a fresh examination of this important but contested Christian belief.

He is author of numerous books and a contributor to Zondervan’s Three Views on the Millennium and Beyond (1999) and Three .

He is author of numerous books and a contributor to Zondervan’s Three Views on the Millennium and Beyond (1999) and Three Views on the Rapture (2010). Douglas J. Moo (PhD, University of St. Andrews) is the Kenneth T. Wessner Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College.

Blaising, Craig, Alan Hultberg, and Douglas Moo, Three Views on the Rapture . 2nd ed. Counterpoints.

Blaising, Craig, Alan Hultberg, and Douglas Moo, Three Views on the Rapture: Pretribulation, Prewrath, or Posttribulation. The quality of argumentation in this book is also high.

Three Views on the Rapture: Pre-tribulation, Pre-wrath, or Post-tribulation (9780310277200) by Craig Blaising, Alan Hultberg, Douglas Mo. Alan D. Hultberg (PhD, Trinity International University and professor of New Testament at Talbot School of Theology) explains the Pre-Wrath view; Craig Blaising (PhD, Dallas Theological Seminary and president of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) defends the Pre-Tribulation view; and Douglas Moo (PhD, University of St. Andrews and professor of New Testament at Wheaton College) sets forth the Post-Tribulation view.

This book explores three views on the Rapture-Pre; Mid; and Post-Tribulation. Download (pdf, 1. 6 Mb) Donate Read.

Craig Alan Blaising (born 1949) is the former Executive Vice President and Provost of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Blaising earned a Doctor of Theology from Dallas Theological Seminary and a Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, a Master of Theology Dallas Theological Seminary, and a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

by Craig A. Blaising, Alan Hultberg, Douglas J. Mo. The rapture is a contested doctrine among evangelicals. Moo. Format: Digital. Alan Hultberg explains the pre-wrath view; Craig Blaising defends the pre-Tribulation view; and Douglas Moo sets forth the post-Tribulation view.

This book explores three views on the Rapture-Pre; Mid; and . Categories: Religion. You may be interested in. Four Views on the Book of Revelation (Counterpoints Series). Andreas J. Kostenberger.

The rapture, or the belief that, at some point, Jesus’ living followers will join him forever while others do not, is an important but contested doctrine among evangelicals. Scholars generally hold one of three perspectives on the timing of and circumstances surrounding the rapture, all of which are presented in Three Views on the Rapture. The recent prominence of a Pre-Wrath understanding of the rapture calls for a fresh examination of this important but contested Christian belief. Alan D. Hultberg (PhD, Trinity International University and professor of New Testament at Talbot School of Theology) explains the Pre-Wrath view; Craig Blaising (PhD, Dallas Theological Seminary and president of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) defends the Pre-Tribulation view; and Douglas Moo (PhD, University of St. Andrews and professor of New Testament at Wheaton College) sets forth the Post-Tribulation view. Each author provides a substantive explanation of his position, which is critiqued by the other two authors. A thorough introduction gives a historical overview of the doctrine of the rapture and its effects on the church. The interactive and fair-minded format of the Counterpoints series allows readers to consider the strengths and weaknesses of each view and draw informed, personal conclusions.


Comments: (7)

Charyoll
Overview

I picked this book up for the purpose of gaining perspective and an adequate representation of each view on the rapture. While many evangelicals consider the issue of the rapture to be clearly [insert your view here], this book makes it clear that there are multiple possibilities. The book is composed of three authors (Craig Blaising, Alan Hultberg, and Douglas Moo), one of them returning from the previous book of three views (Pre, Mid, and Post). Craig represents Pre-trib, Hultberg Pre-wrath, and Moo Post-trib. All authors had a significant amount of room to flesh out their views and positions, then the other authors brought out their objects in a short response, and then (different from all over perspectives books I have read) the original author is allowed a rejoinder (a response to the criticism received).

Pros

1) Layout/Format – These books are designed perfectly in my opinion. I don’t believe in just copy and pasting another theologians views (as many do unfortunately), but instead gaining perspective on interpretation and thinking through prayerfully what the Bible says. These books offer a layout that is perfect for this.

2) Two responses – I like the fact they allowed for a response to the responses. It adds another dimension that you always want form these books. (What would he have said to that critique? Now you know)

3) Clarity on the subject – If the reader pays attention to the line of argumentation in this book for each view, I believe they can come away with a very clear perspective and idea of the subject of the rapture. Whether the reader lands at a particular view or not is irrelevant, they should be able to walk away with an idea of the strengths and weaknesses of each position

4) Clear Winner/Loser – I believe in this book there was a clear winner and a clear loser. Not that any view failed to deliver an argument, but I believe one view stood out as having the least holes and another stood out as having too many holes.

Cons

1) Underlying theology – This is a long one, but very important. As anybody who studies eschatology knows, there is more behind your eschatological view than just reading Revelation a bunch of times. In reality the view one has of the Church/Israel and the hermeneutical approach taken has a dramatically larger effect on where the reader lands. In this book the Pre-trib author seems to be Progressive-Dispensational, but at times comes across as a classic-dispensational. The Pre-wrath author takes an eclectic approach to Revelation and a “throughout history” approach to the early part of the Olivet discourse. He also maintains that he is a Progressive-Dispensational, but clearly stated in the book that Matthew presented the church as having replaced Israel as one of his arguments for the Olivet Discourse being for the Church. (I feel like he didn’t have to do this for an argument, rather unfortunate and leaves himself open to criticism from the Pre-trib guy) Lastly, the Post-trib author seems to be a type of Historic-Premil. He views Daniels 70th week as being the entire period of time from the first advent of Christ on, which in my opinion is the hermeneutically disastrous and nearly impossible to prove in Daniel 9 such an exegetical case. He also clearly ascribes to replacement theology and in so doing opens himself up for odd interpretations and avenues for attack.

a. What is worse, or what this first “Con” leads to, is that while each rapture position stands as a type of representation of each position, I feel like there is great differences even WITHIN the positions themselves because of these differences in ecclesiology and hermeneutics.

My favorite part of the book

It may seem like the large “CON” means I didn’t like the book, but that is far from the truth. I just figured I would note the problem with the different authors in the event that anybody actually gets this book after reading this. It is very important to keep that in mind when reading, so as not to deny a view based on a straw man or a false broadbrushing.

The best part of this book is the perspective, depth, and resource that it brings to the Pre-mil theology student’s library. It is a helpful source, with errors in each view, but tons of good conversation and points made on each side.

This Book should be read by…

Everybody should read this book. It is not hard to understand. (I felt the pre-trib guy was at times convoluted, but that is because pre-tribulationism isn’t found in the Bible and convoluted arguments must be made to get there) Aside from the periods of brief linguistic analysis I feel like this book is well served to give each lay person a solid perspective to this doctrine and to understand that it isn’t as simple as your preacher may have told you it was.

The theologian/scholar/teacher/pastor should get this book in order to challenge their view and understanding of the key texts involved. An Amil/Postmil person will probably giggle at this book and mock the idea. That is okay, I do the same with their hermeneutical approach to the Old Testament and Revelation.
Saberdragon
My original copy was falling apart. This copy was in good shape. Many mistakenly place this book under eschatology. This is a fine, easily understandable book on soteriology or salvation. It is simply a book for young Christians which leans a bit toward Calvanism, but is really pretty balanced between free will and predestination. The book was written at the time when Lindsey was working/traveling with Walter Martin and John Warwick Montgomery. The three had differing viewpoints and I'm relatively certain helped Lindsey keep a rather balanced book on Christian salvation ... excellent read.
Zetadda
This concept of having opposing views state their position and then give an opportunity to the others to rebut works well for me. Personally weary of being spoon fed so much poor theology I am of the mind this format should be used more often. Its also an opportunity to hear from people you may not previously have been aware of. I especially enjoyed Douglas Moo's honesty and all the three writers mutual treating of the others with respect was refreshing. You cannot help but learn from this book and the format!
Gianni_Giant
Best book ever for explaining the Christian faith.
Vutaur
This book was never a best seller because it wasn't contraversial or sensational. Sound doctrine is never sensational, and it is never a best seller! And that is what this book is: an outstanding presentation of salvation and fundamental Biblical doctrine in an easy to follow format. Hal Lindsey develops an understanding of what is wrong with the world (the sin nature of man), and he then develops an understanding of how Jesus Christ provided the remedy for what is wrong with the world. He builds four walls between man and God, and then shows how Jesus tears the walls down.

To this day, I still present the Gospel using the outline provided in this book. Rather than going out of print, this book should be required reading in every Bible college in the country, and required reading by every Christian who speaks English.
Kemath
This is a re-publication of an earlier work. The added time has allowed the authors (2 returning and 1 new) to bring new research and fresh thinking to an age-old question: "When will the Lord return and establish justice on Earth and what is the Church's role?" The format allows the authors to not only present their cases for pre-tribulation rapture, pre-wrath rapture, and post-trib rapture, but also to interact with each other's arguments providing ample data for interested readers to develop their own belief in regard to End Times.
RUsich155
This book has excellent authors and a newer perspective and teaching on the Book of Revelation topics. I got this for an extra credit project in Seminary, and it is perfect for my need.
The best book Hal Lindsey ever wrote. One of my all-time favorites of thousands of books in my library.
Three Views on the Rapture: Pretribulation, Prewrath, or Posttribulation (Counterpoints: Bible and Theology) download epub
Bible Study & Reference
Author: Craig A. Blaising,Douglas J. Moo,Stanley N. Gundry,Alan Hultberg
ISBN: 0310277205
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Zondervan; 2 edition (December 25, 2010)
Pages: 304 pages