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An Introduction to the Gospel of John (Anchor Bible Reference Library) download epub

by Raymond E. Brown,Francis J. Moloney


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Raymond Brown was a top-notch Catholic biblical scholar and has written a plethora of books that can attest to this. Moloney detects a shift in Brown's position, who now gives more attention to studying the Gospel as it stands.

Raymond Brown was a top-notch Catholic biblical scholar and has written a plethora of books that can attest to this. In this book, Brown has put together an invaluable tool for better understanding all of the facets of the Gospel of John. Keeping up with the times, Brown was not afraid to revise and reconsider information he earlier espoused. This book can be read by a layperson or a serious biblical scholar.

When Raymond E. Brown died in 1998, less than .

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library . He was the author of three books in the Anchor Bible series on the Gospels and Epistles of John and wrote the classic Anchor Bible Reference Library volumes The Birth of the Messiah, The Death of the Messiah, and An Introduction to the New Testament.

Start by marking An Introduction to the Gospel of John as Want to Read . Anchor Bible Reference Library (1 - 10 of 36 books). Books by Raymond E. Brown

Start by marking An Introduction to the Gospel of John as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Brown (and Moloney) also contrast John with the synoptic gospels, contemplate the relationship of ideas to Gnosticism, Hellenism, Jewish Wisdom motifs, and other popular strains of thought, consider the role of John the Baptist and his followers, the role and definition of "the Jews" as mentioned in the text, the possible place of composition (Brown puts his best bet on the Ephesus region. Brown

Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library. By (author) Raymond E. Brown, By (author) Francis J. Moloney

Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library. Moloney.

Series: Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library Categories: Special Studies in John.

Francis J. Moloney, Raymond E. Brown. Place of Publication

Francis J. Place of Publication. Francis J. Maloney, . is Katherine Drexel Chair for Religious Studies at the Catholic University of America in Washington, . Among his many distinguished books are The Gospel of John, A Hard Saying: The Gospel and Culture, and The Gospel of Mark. Country of Publication.

of John, Series: Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library, Author: Raymond E. Brown, Publisher: Yale University Press (2003).

An Introduction to the Gospel of John, Series: Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library, Author: Raymond E. An Introduction to the Gospel of John represents the culmination of Brown’s long and intense examination of part of the New Testament.

Raymond Edward Brown. Brown University Library. John - Introductions. Moloney, The Anchor Bible. Reference Library (New York: Doubleday, 2003), 234-48. 3 F. J. Moloney, Raymond Brown’s new introduction to the gospel of John: A presentation and some. 2 R. E. Brown, The Pater Noster as an Eschatological Prayer, Theological Studies (May 1961) vol. 22. no. 2, 175-208. questions, in The Biblical Quarterly, Jan 1989 (Vol. 51, no 1). It should be noted that in the final. to the Gospel of John

When Raymond E. Brown died in 1998, less than a year after the publication of his masterpiece, An Introduction to the New Testament, he left behind a nearly completed revision of his acclaimed two-volume commentary on the Gospel of John. The manuscript, skillfully edited by Francis J. Moloney, displays the rare combination of meticulous scholarship and clear, engaging writing that made Father Brown’s books consistently outsell other works of biblical scholarship. An Introduction to the Gospel of John represents the culmination of Brown’s long and intense examination of part of the New Testament. One of the most important aspects of this new book, particularly to the scholarly community, is how it differs from the original commentary in several important ways. It presents, for example, a new perspective on the historical development of the Gospels, and shows how Brown decided to open his work to literary readings of the text, rather than relying primarily on the historical, which informed the original volumes. In addition, there is an entire section devoted to Christology, absent in the original, as well as a magisterial new section on the representation of Jews in the Gospel of John.


Comments: (7)

Vikus
Raymond Brown was a top-notch Catholic biblical scholar and has written a plethora of books that can attest to this. In this book, Brown has put together an invaluable tool for better understanding all of the facets of the Gospel of John. Keeping up with the times, Brown was not afraid to revise and reconsider information he earlier espoused. This book can be read by a layperson or a serious biblical scholar.
Kajishakar
Before his sudden death in 1998 Raymond Brown was working on a revision of his widely acclaimed two-volume commentary on the Gospel of John (Anchor 29, 29A). What he left behind was a nearly completed new Introduction which, however, needed to be edited before publishing. The job fell to the highly qualified Francis Moloney, himself the author of several well-received publications on John. The result is a very valuable updating supplement to Brown's earlier work. My attempt to give something of the content and flavor of this book is of necessity selective.

The major effort is Brown's, but the contribution of Moloney is substantial. He supplies (1) a helpful editor's introduction, (2) a speculative conclusion, (3) an excursus on narrative-critical approaches to the Gospel of John (adapted, mostly word for word, from a similar excursus in his Sacra Pagina commentary), (4) an excursus on the history of the Johannine community, (5) editor's notes to clarify or add to Brown's text, (6) the outline and major themes of chapters 13-21 that Brown did not get around to writing, and (7) updates of Brown's bibliographies. Not least interesting are those instances where the two scholars differ. Thus, in his Introduction Moloney debates the Johannine use of Son of Man, and again in an extended note where Brown first dismisses Moloney's 1976 exegesis of two relevant verses (p. 257, n.87). He objects to Brown's references to the replacement of Jewish institutions and is much happier when Brown, rather, speaks of their fulfillment. Whereas, had Brown written the outline and themes of chapters 13-21, he would (presumably) have approached what appears to be contradictions and repetitions in 13-17 in terms of the historical development of the Gospel, Moloney looks at the text as we have it and sees unified themes and careful structure in a reverse A-B-B'-A' pattern.

The question inevitably comes up: How does the new Introduction differ from the original one of 1966? The subjects covered are the same and arranged in the same order. Some of the changes, where they occur, are purely stylistic (unnecessary words unloaded, all Brown's "we" references to himself replaced by "I"). Yet the rewriting can be incisive, too. The ending of the section dealing with influences on the religious thought of the Gospel is similar in both editions; but what was almost a casual statement in 1966 has been turned into a most thought-provoking question: "The Fourth Gospel claims to be dependent on the testimony of a disciple who was particularly loved by Jesus ... Is this not also a claim to a certain connaturality of thought between Jesus and those responsible for the development and writing of John?"

Other changes are more far-reaching. In 1966 Brown proposed five stages in the composition of the Gospel. These have been collapsed into three, partly because some critics found the original theory too complex. With less than innocent humor he remarks that "a number of reviewers found counting up to five very difficult ..." (!) The modified theory corresponds to what is generally accepted for the composition of the synoptic gospels. Brown's exposition of apologetic motifs covers the same groups as before (adherents of John the Baptist, etc.) but he is now clear in the belief that the apologetics "pertain to the context out of which the Gospel developed [referring to the Johannine community's controversies with other groups] rather than to its purpose." He does not think the purpose of the Gospel was to refute or to persuade non-believers but to strengthen the faith of those who already believed. Moloney concurs. The section dealing with apologetics against the Jews has been completely rewritten and expanded. Previously Brown considered that "the Jews" designated the Jewish authorities, but now recognizes that it refers broadly to all such Jews whose role in the narrative is to oppose Jesus. He candidly admits, "I did not wrestle with this issue sufficiently in my first edition, and the flood of writing on the subject since that time has caused me to be more careful." Under Crucial Questions in Johannine Theology a new section on Christology has been added, with Son of Man and Wisdom motifs treated in detail. (Wisdom Motifs was a sub-section of Theology in the original Introduction.)

Moloney detects a shift in Brown's position, who now gives more attention to studying the Gospel as it stands. How much this would have influenced Brown's projected revision of the commentary is a matter of speculation. One may conclude that Brown would not have given up the historical-critical method at which he excelled, but in addition to it would have benefited from the scholarly work of others in developing new approaches to the Gospel of John.

Anyone who has followed the writings of Raymond Brown, admired his analytical prowess, and perceived that his lucid prose is as much a tribute to his clear thinking as it is to his writing skill, would not want to miss this final gift from one who has justly been called a great scholar and a master interpreter.
Llanonte
If you enjoy the Johannine scholarship of the late Father Raymond Brown, this book must be on your shelf. Francis Moloney, S.D.B., has edited this work from his papers, one of the last efforts by Father Brown, and by doing so preserved his final insights into the Johannine community, the mysteries surrounding John's identity, and the Gospel's theology.
Qiahmagha
Good commentary for everybody. Probably one of the best works for the Gospel of John. I am interested in he other works by him.
Daigami
This is a must read for anyone delving into the "love" gospel. And who is a better guide (although I often wish that someone would come out with the 'Reader's Digest' version of Ray Brown) than a scholar who is also obviously a lover. I don't need to hear all of the alternative theories, but I'm sure that some theology student's do.
Gogul
Fantastic and beautiful beyond description- what else can be said of the Word and about the Gospel of St John?
Qusserel
Good book, I recommend you read, came in good condition and on time. Thank You
Ray Brown is splendid in his explanations of how he developed his understanding of The Fourth Gospel. We will miss him.
An Introduction to the Gospel of John (Anchor Bible Reference Library) download epub
Bible Study & Reference
Author: Raymond E. Brown,Francis J. Moloney
ISBN: 0385507224
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Anchor Bible; 1 edition (August 19, 2003)
Pages: 384 pages