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The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity download epub

by Michael Joseph Brown


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Michael Brown is one of the most creative scholars of early Christian studies around. Better yet, Brown locates a germinal core to the Lord's Prayer that sustains faith in situ.

Michael Brown is one of the most creative scholars of early Christian studies around. His book opens new and profound perspectives on the most famous Christian prayer. Adela Yarbro Collins, Buckingham Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation, Yale University Divinity School). Certainly less burdened by what some readers consider "dry" dogma, Brown's project presents an enigmatic transformation, which North African Christians discovered by way of communal identification through the Prayer that Jesus taught.

Start by marking The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes: A. .

Start by marking The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Beginning with an imagined Graeco-Roman auditor of the Lord's Prayer, Brown demonstrates how a Graeco-Roman's understanding of the prayer would have been different from that of a Hellenized Jew in Palestine. Brown takes the reader into discu Michael Brown's book helps to explain why Christians throughout the ages have interpreted texts differently, especially cultic texts.

Brown’s focus for his scholarship is the development of Christianity in North Africa, and more specifically the development of Christian practices. He has written extensively on prayer in early church, including his most recent book, The Lord’s Prayer through North African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity (2005). He says, Only through understanding its practices can we understand the genius of Christianity.

by Michael Joseph Brown. Michael Brown's book helps to explain why Christians throughout the ages have interpreted texts differently, especially cultic texts.

Title: The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity

Title: The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity. Publication Date: 2004. Pages: 312. About Michael Joseph Brown. Michael Joseph Brown is Assistant Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins, Candler School of Theology, Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. He is the author of What They Don’t Tell You: A Survivor’s Guide to Academic Biblical Studies.

Are you sure you want to remove The Lord's Prayer Through North African Eyes from your list? . A Window Into Early Christianity.

Are you sure you want to remove The Lord's Prayer Through North African Eyes from your list? The Lord's Prayer Through North African Eyes. by Michael Joseph Brown. Published January 9, 2005 by T. & T. Clark Publishers.

Similar books and articles. Early Libyan Christianity: Uncovering a North African Tradition. Becoming an Exemplar for God: Three Early Interpretations of Forgiveness in the Lord’s Prayer. Roman and North African Christianity. Geoffrey Dunn - 2009 - In D. Jeffrey Bingham (e., The Routledge Companion to Early Christian Thought. David E. Wilhite - 2013 - Augustinian Studies 44 (1):127-130. Origen and Gregory of Nyssa on The Lord’s Prayer. Sj John Gavin - 2013 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 16 (3):126-146. Prayer and Morality in the Sermon on the Mount.

Maureen A. Tilley, "Michael Joseph Brown, The Lord’s Prayer through African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity," The Journal of Religion 87, no. 2 (April 2007): 273-274.

Michael Joseph Brown is Assistant Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins, Candler School of Theology, Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. He is the author of What They Don't Tell You: A Survivor's Guide to Academic Biblical Studies. Библиографические данные. Blackening of the Bible: The Aims of African American Biblical Scholarship African American Religious Thought and Life. Michael Joseph Brown.

Michael Brown's book helps to explain why Christians throughout the ages have interpreted texts differently, especially cultic texts.

Michael Brown's book helps to explain why Christians throughout the ages have interpreted texts differently, especially cultic texts. Beginning with an imagined Graeco-Roman auditor of the Lord's Prayer, Brown demonstrates how a Graeco-Roman's understanding of the prayer would have been different from that of a Hellenized Jew in Palestine. Brown takes the reader into discussions of early Graeco-Roman Christians regarding prayer in general and the Lord's Prayer in particular. Focusing on cultic didachai of Clement of Alexandria and Tertullian of Carthage, The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes is a window into the turbulent and sometimes confusing world of second-century Christianity in Africa.


Comments: (2)

Antuiserum
Michael Joseph Brown is Associate Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins and Director of the Graduate Division of Religion, Candler School of Theology, Emory University. His dual research interests in ancient Roman Christian artifacts and contemporary communal liberation in the Gospel converge in this 2005 text.

The window that he depicts in the subtitle for the book ("A window into Early Christianity") pertains to how second-century Christians in the Sinai and Egypt might have experienced their own perspective of faith when repeating the Lord's Prayer. Dr. Brown's thesis is equally how North African Christians differed in communal identity with the Lord's Prayer from the diaspora of Hellenic Christians around the time of the Bar Kochba Rebellion.

The author's project creates an imagined Christian auditor from 2nd-century Alexandria. Influenced by Hellenic associates of his imagined auditor, who included two North African apologists Tertullian (c.160-220) and Clement of Alexandria (c.150-215), the auditor is a composite of Greek, Roman, and Egyptian Christians of the area. The risk of such an amalgam in the auditor herein is equating the cultic repetition of the Lord's Prayer among North Africans with the practice of equality among members of the ekklesia in North Africa. While the hypothesis to draw such an equation appeals to a post-modern audience, contravening evidence is either ignored or glossed over.

Yet, the text presents an appeal to ethno-religious inquiry that deserves a lasting dialogue, and I thank Dr. Brown and others for avoiding cant to advance the dialogue. On the other hand, the author's critical vision to employ comparisons and differences among prevailing cultures on this southeastern margin of the Empire's receding shores in the second century casts a jaundiced view of leadership exercised by first-century witnesses of Christ. For this reason alone, readers must identify bias favoring marginalized members of Christ's Body, among whom was Brown's imaginary auditor.

To avoid skimping on details in this review, I want to commend the author for providing an excellent Preface, in which he summarizes chapters and progression of argument in the book. The first three chapters deliver an ethno-religious method that refreshes and energizes the reader for more dense, interpretive chapters concerning Clement and Tertullian to follow. A stellar bibliography and precise index complete 272 pages of text. It is my opinion that Brown has accomplished far more than entertain the intersections of culture, ethnicity and comparative religions in this extension of his doctoral thesis from Chicago.

Better yet, Brown locates a germinal core to the Lord's Prayer that sustains faith in situ. Certainly less burdened by what some readers consider "dry" dogma, Brown's project presents an enigmatic transformation, which North African Christians discovered by way of communal identification through the Prayer that Jesus taught.

This book has earned a respected place on the shelves of archaeologists, historical philosophers, hermeneutic philologists and theologians, historians of art, and ecumenical dialogians. More than cursory knowledge of the synoptic Gospels and the Book of Acts from the Christian Scriptures would help anyone inclined to read this book. But the task of critical reading is an excellent investment, as I found.
Nicearad
In The Lord's Prayer Through North African Eyes, Michael J. Brown demonstrates that the dominical pater noster of Matthew 6:9ff is a distinctive invocation since it does not contain any sacred epithets (cognomina) that describe the God and Father of Jesus Christ. He suggests that the invocation, when heard by a "typical" Greco-Roman, would probably have evoked notions of a Roman household head (paterfamilias) or called to mind the ancient patron-client relationship in aRome as well as similar types of divine prayers incorporated in then contemporary Greco-Roman literature. Moreover, the famous and venerable prayer may have reminded some Roman citizens of the emperor, whom Romans considered father of their homeland (pater patriae). The early Christian apologist Tertullian himself probably viewed "Father" as a divine cognomen and metaphor. His exegesis of the dominical oration indicates as much since he linguistically parallels "Father" and "God," at times indicating that he believes the former nomen is an integral designation for the maximally excellent being: "Moreover, in saying 'Father,' we also call Him 'God.' That appellation is one both of filial duty and of power" (Tertullian, De oratione 2.10-11).

Michael Joseph Brown's point is that we do not interpret texts in abstracto. An imagined "Greco-Roman auditor" would not have heard the prayer in the same way that a Hellenized Jew or modern-day denizen would have heard or perceived it. Moreover, Brown wants to construct a thought-world in order to help us understand the contextual dynamics of the pater noster. The evidence that he summons is impressive and his book held my attention throughout my reading of the work.
The Lord's Prayer through North African Eyes: A Window into Early Christianity download epub
Bible Study & Reference
Author: Michael Joseph Brown
ISBN: 0567026701
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: T&T Clark; First Edition edition (November 22, 2004)
Pages: 312 pages