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Deuteronomy (Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible) download epub

by Telford Work


Epub Book: 1762 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1492 kb.

Bible Study & Reference. Each passage of the texts receives a four-fold reflection: plain, faith, hope, and love. These four reflections are usually about a paragraph long.

Leithart's work stimulating in its unabashedly theological interpretive stance. Such a starting point for the exegetical task inquires differently of the text and renders fresh applications and observations.

Deuteronomy by Telford Work. 1 Samuel by Francesca Aran Murphy. 1 & 2 Kings by Peter J. Leithart. Wells and Sumner offer readings of Esther and Daniel that display their insights as careful, thoughtful readers, while also revealing their roles as contemporary tradents passing on insights from their historic predecessors to their contemporary community.

In the eighth volume in the series, Telford Work presents a theological exegesis of Deuteronomy.

Leading theologians read and interpret scripture for today's church, providing guidance for reading the Bible under the rule of faith.

Modern interpreters of the Bible questioned this premise. In the eighth volume in the series, Telford Work presents a theological exegesis of Deuteronomy. But in recent decades, a critical mass of theologians and biblical scholars has begun to reassert the priority of a theological reading of Scripture. In the eighth volume in the series, Telford Work presents a theological exegesis of Deuteronomy

In the eighth volume in the series, Telford Work presents a theological exegesis of Deuteronomy.

In this addition to the series, highly acclaimed author, speaker, and theologian Robert Barron offers a theological exegesis of 2 Samuel. He highlights three major themes: God's non-competitive transcendence, the play between divine and non-divine causality, and the role of Old Testament kingship. As with other volumes in the series, this book is ideal for those called to ministry, serving as a rich resource for preachers, teachers, students, and study groups. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The guiding theological framework for the perspective of the series is the Nicene Creed, which is arguably the most important doctrinal statement in the history of the church.

Telford Work’s winsome theological exegesis of Deuteronomy will be of. .Telford Work insightfully guides the reader through this important book.

Telford Work’s winsome theological exegesis of Deuteronomy will be of use to professors and students in Old Testament, Deuteronomy, Pentateuch, and theological interpretation courses as well as pastors and lay readers. Telford Work insightfully guides the reader through this important book and displays its significance to today's community of faith.

Pastors and leaders of the classical church--such as Augustine, Calvin, Luther, and Wesley--interpreted the Bible theologically, believing Scripture as a whole witnessed to the gospel of Jesus Christ. Modern interpreters of the Bible questioned this premise. But in recent decades, a critical mass of theologians and biblical scholars has begun to reassert the priority of a theological reading of Scripture.The Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible enlists leading theologians to read and interpret Scripture for the twenty-first century, just as the church fathers, the Reformers, and other orthodox Christians did for their times and places. In the eighth volume in the series, Telford Work presents a theological exegesis of Deuteronomy.

Comments: (5)

Dalarin
The first commentary I used in this series by Brazos, Jonah, was an incredibly thoughtful and faithful work. It didn't fit neatly into a category of verse-by-verse, exegetical commentary, but I already had a couple of those and wanted a work to handle, idea-by-idea, what the text was talking about. In light of that experience I was looking forward to Telford Work's commentary on Deuteronomy.

Its uniqueness was a pleasant, if not semi-expected, experience. While Work does take the text in chunks of verses he does not primarily treat the grammatical or literary/critical aspects of the book. In fact, he rarely does. Instead, his stated goal is, "to form and discipline a contemporary apostolic imagination by reading every passage of Deuteronomy according to the sensibilities of the New Testament church." (pg. 18) To a pastor looking for ways to read and expound on Deuteronomy that would energize believers, this was an exciting goal.

To that end, Work took some cues from early church theological categories and the structure of the Talmud and ended up with a work that comments on each passage through a combination of lenses he labels as: Plain, Faith, Hope, and Love.

It takes some getting used to. With each scripture commented on, the reader has to grow accustomed to what each category conveys and how each leads you through the passage in Deuteronomy to New Testament Scriptures and Christ. But once that learning curve is met, there are some very thoughtful and valuable things to be gained.

In every commentary that attempts to "apply" a passage of Scripture there are moments of hit and miss. And it is probably up to each reader to determine what exactly hits and misses. I found several moments of "hits" in which Work communicated the truths in Deuteronomy through the lens of Jesus Christ and the NT church in such a way that impacted the people I taught. I was especially caught early in the commentary about his comment that "revision is rebellion," and his thoughts on how we are rebellious in light of forgetting the cultural soil tilled by the law of God.

Beyond the issues of application, there were a few (but very few) sections in which I believe the movement from Deuteronomy to the New Testament was colored more by certain sociological (and possibly political?) points of view smuggled into the text more than standard New Testament theological categories.

One more point of personal frustration came with the inclusion of an abbreviation unique to this commentary. The author used "+" to indicate "a term that could or should be translated inclusively to allow the reader to judge whether and how to respect gender inclusivity." (pg. 15) I am a supporter of so-called "gender-neutral" translations in which the modern languages translate the original inclusive pronouns as inclusive. But Work noted more than that in his commentary; he used "+" at every pronoun usage for God. Not only did this become distracting, it became frustrating to me. If the original languages use inclusive language, then we have good reason to do the same. When they don't, as they don't in reference to God, then I believe we do not have good reason to "judge whether and how to respect gender inclusivity."

In the end, these two criticisms were enough for me to put the commentary down several times. And eventually, the promise of the positives caused me to pick it up again and again. My ultimate suggestion with this commentary would be as a useful tool alongside some verse-by-verse exegetical works, and even with a strong grasp on New Testament theology.
Sharpmane
In keeping with Brazos stated goal of offering theological commentaries, Telford Work offers a meditative commentary on Deuteronomy. Each passage of the texts receives a four-fold reflection: plain, faith, hope, and love. These four reflections are usually about a paragraph long. In the plain section, Work offers a straightforward sense of the text, drawing up literal understanding as well as literary or historical meaning. Then he proceeds to introduce three other historical approaches to Biblical texts: allegorical and focused primarily upon the fulfillment in Christ and his Church (faith), anagogical or eschatological (hope), and tropological or moral (love). I use this commentary for a slow, prayerful reading of the various passages.
Vikus
I welcome Work's attempt to use the pre-critical four-fold hermeneutic. However, the publisher really needed to think through the formatting for printing purposes as this current format is extremely cumbersome.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
great
Brick my own
A mildly bizarre and experimental commentary. Almost a thought experiment. Just how much can I annoy my readers by noting every time I use male pronouns for God? Here's a page showing what my commentary would look like if it was organized like the Talmud.

Might be helpful as vacation reading or a supplemental reading along with stodgy academic and straight theological commentaries. There are some interesting and even edifying insights scattered about, but think supplemental, entertainment, or personal edification and not the backbone of sermon preparation. Intriguing but not finally satisfying.

Sent to me by a book seller by accident.
Deuteronomy (Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible) download epub
Bible Study & Reference
Author: Telford Work
ISBN: 1587430983
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Brazos Press (February 1, 2009)
Pages: 336 pages