» » The Book of J

The Book of J download epub

by Harold Bloom


Epub Book: 1990 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1652 kb.

My interest in this book was from a textual comparison point of view; I have been fascinated by the differences, often glaringly contradictory, in many translations of the Bible (as well as other books).

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). My interest in this book was from a textual comparison point of view; I have been fascinated by the differences, often glaringly contradictory, in many translations of the Bible (as well as other books). This is evidence that translations do indeed usually signify interpretation. Therefore, no translation can be 100% accurate, as even the original is open to interpretation.

Harold Bloom, the prodigious literary critic who championed and defended the Western canon in an outpouring of. .

Harold Bloom, the prodigious literary critic who championed and defended the Western canon in an outpouring of influential books that appeared not only on college syllabuses but also - unusual for an academic - on best-seller lists, died on Monday at a hospital in New Haven. The Book of J became a best seller.

Harold Bloom (July 11, 1930 – October 14, 2019) was an American literary critic and the Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University. Following the publication of his first book in 1959, Bloom wrote more than fifty books, including twenty books of literary criticism, several books discussing religion, and a novel.

The book of j. translated by David Rosenberg & by Harold Bloom.

In The Book of J, accompanying David Rosenberg's startling new translation, America's greatest literary critic, Harold Bloom, asserts that J was a writer of the stature of Homer, Shakespeare, and Tolstoy and puts forth the revolutionary idea that J was very likely a woman

In The Book of J, accompanying David Rosenberg's startling new translation, America's greatest literary critic, Harold Bloom, asserts that J was a writer of the stature of Homer, Shakespeare, and Tolstoy and puts forth the revolutionary idea that J was very likely a woman. J was a genius with unmatched powers of irony and characterization, as shown in her unforgettable and. very human portraits of Abram and Sarai, Rebecca, Jacob and Rachel, Joseph, Tamar, and Moses - and, above all, God, or Yahweh.

Although ostensibly a book of literary criticism, Bloom’s Book Of J, does more than stake out a claim for the J writer as one of the giants in Western literary . The Book of J By Harold Bloom, translated by David Rosenberg

Although ostensibly a book of literary criticism, Bloom’s Book Of J, does more than stake out a claim for the J writer as one of the giants in Western literary history, he also uses hi. The Book of J By Harold Bloom, translated by David Rosenberg. Appendix - Book of J Chronology.

In The Book of J, accompanying David Rosenberg's startling new translation, America's greatest literary critic, Harold Bloom . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

In The Book of J, accompanying David Rosenberg's startling new translation, America's greatest literary critic, Harold Bloom, asserts that J was a writer of the stature of Homer, Shakespeare, and Tolstoy and puts forth the revolutionary idea that J was very likely a woman.

Bloom concludes this provocative, trenchant work with a complete list of essential writers and books - his vision of the Canon.

He argues against ideology in literary criticism; he laments the loss of intellectual and aesthetic standards; he deplores multiculturalism, Marxism, feminism, neoconservatism, Afrocentrism, and the New Historicism. Insisting instead upon "the autonomy of the aesthetic, " Bloom places Shakespeare at the center of the Western Canon. Bloom concludes this provocative, trenchant work with a complete list of essential writers and books - his vision of the Canon.

J is the title that scholars ascribe to the nameless writer they believe is responsible for the text, written between 950 and 900 BCE, on which Genesis, Exodus and Numbers is based. In The Book of J, Bloom and Rosenberg draw the J text out of the surrounding material and present it as the seminal classic that it is.In addition to Rosenberg's original translations, Bloom argues in several essays that "J" was not a religious writer but a fierce ironist and a woman living in the court of King Solomon. He also argues that J is a writer on par with Homer, Shakespeare and Tolstoy.Bloom also offers historical context, a discussion of the theory of how the different texts came together to create the Bible, and translation notes. Rosenberg's translations from the Hebrew bring J's stories to life and reveal her towering originality and grasp of humanity.

Comments: (7)

Nikohn
Bloom shares his interesting ideas about the parts of the Torah/Pentateuch which were written by the Yahwist, whom he calls J. Rosenberg's translations of these parts is amazing; really bringing out the irony that Bloom mentions so often in this book.

Religion doesn't play a part in this project, in fact, Bloom makes the argument that J should be considered blasphemous when taken in conjunction with the orthodox views of God, Yahweh, or whatever one happens to call this character; that is what Yahweh is to J: a character.

Knowing something of the Bible is more than helpful; and actually, I can't imagine anyone who doesn't know the Bible fairly well being interested in this book. Even lit geeks, if a knowledge of the Bible is lacking, may have trouble with most of what Bloom says about the sections which scholars believe were written by J.

Bloom discusses J, E, P, D and R: writers and redactors who had a hand in what we now call the Torah or the Pentateuch. Some religious believers don't like this, because the Bible itself says that Moses is the author. However, scholars have been able to recognize different styles, and certain aspects of an earlier writer which were missed inadvertently by a later one.

I will spare the details, because Bloom does a much better job of expounding them. But, he doesn't go into depth with any writer, except J.

My interest in this book was from a textual comparison point of view; I have been fascinated by the differences, often glaringly contradictory, in many translations of the Bible (as well as other books). This is evidence that translations do indeed usually signify interpretation. Therefore, no translation can be 100% accurate, as even the original is open to interpretation. This can become a thorny mess and has led to many arguments, which thankfully, Bloom doesn't spend too much time on. His interest is mostly literary, so he avoids much of the theological/philosophical arguments concerning the meanings, etc. This also gives him freedom to take off the "rose colored glasses" of religious interpretation, which often blind readers to what is actually written.

If you are at all interested in the history of the text of the Tanakh/Old Testament, specifically the Torah/Pentateuch/Books of Moses; or in textual comparison, interpretation, criticism, etc.; then, I recommend this book. It does lack a scholarly apparatus, as many of Bloom's books do, making it difficult to do further research, etc. from this text. It is, however, a good place to begin, and (as it was meant to be) to be enjoyed by the lay reader/general public.
Laizel
The blurb for this book puts J's story, as Rosenberg translates it, right up there with Homer, Shakespeare, and Tolstoy. Tolstoy never comes to mind whenever I read J--heavy bloke--for J has a genius for merry lilt of diction which we must suppose she really put there and Rosenberg has faithfully captured. A great read, and Bloom's exegesis is so informative and compelling. Truly, it falls fairly on the ear when read aloud (as I some-
times do even just to myself) as was the original intent no doubt, especially if the reader can fancy the sound of it as read in a Celtic lilt.
Bukelv
I have have spent many hours with the Book of J. I find Bloom at his best here, he says and I think that it is true that, " millions over the centuries have misread Genesis." If you know the Old Testament, read this with an open mind and you may discover that you didn't know it at all.
Ucantia
Awesome background reading before the actual J text..I'm very much captured by J....where has this text been my whole life ? Its real, very real reading....
unmasked
Interesting book. Some knowledge before hand of Old Testament both in the Jewish and Christian tradition is helpful.
Quttaro
This book is like an introduction or, even, an initiation to the real Scripture. Be ready to read it more than once - and keep as a reference forever.
Fog
I always felt that there was something amiss with a god that demanded "blood and guts", that out of one side of his mouth said, "Don't kill" and from the other said, "Kill all the people in that town." Now I get it - the blood and guts were edited in by humans with a political agenda. This is what Jesus railed against. And it is reassuring to know that the 'scary' stories have nothing to do with the power that breathes us, which is what I call God.

Very specifically, I was researching the strange custom of circumcision for a book I was writing about having been circumcised as a little girl in Kansas. I could accept that maybe tribes in Africa who modified other body parts, for entertainment or as an art form - would do something like that - perhaps because they were bored!... But doctors? In the 20th Century? I was mystified.

I already knew that there were no medical benefits of circumcision - other than the money involved for the MD and the hospital. Fortunately, "The Book of J" made it clear to me that circumcision had nothing to do with Abraham or the original Hebrew people, and everything to do with some invading force that wanted to control the Hebrews - what better way to prove that you are the boss than to terrify infants (and their parents, of course). Circumcision is a step beyond having them "by the short and curlies".

And so it continues even today... unfortunately.
Fascinating
The Book of J download epub
Bible Study & Reference
Author: Harold Bloom
ISBN: 0802141919
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Grove Press (November 30, 2004)
Pages: 352 pages