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Cult of the Saints (its rise and function in Latin Christianity) download epub

by P. Brown


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Brown challenges the long-held two-tier idea of religion that separated the religious practices of the sophisticated elites from those of the superstitious masses, instead arguing that the cult of the saints crossed boundaries an. .

Brown challenges the long-held two-tier idea of religion that separated the religious practices of the sophisticated elites from those of the superstitious masses, instead arguing that the cult of the saints crossed boundaries and played a dynamic part in both the Christian faith and the larger world of late antiquity. He shows how men and women living in harsh and sometimes barbaric times relied upon the holy dead to obtain justice, forgiveness, and power, and how a single sainted hair could inspire great thinkers and great artists. University of Chicago Press, 12 нояб.

Brown has an international reputation for his fine style, a style he here turns on to illuminate the cult of the saints. Christianity was born without such a cult; it took rise and that rise needs chronicling. Brown has a gift for the memorable phrase and sees what the passersby have often overlooked. An eye-opener on an important but neglected phase of Western development. â?”The Christian Century. Brilliantly original and highly sophisticated.

Christianity was born without such a cult; it took rise and that rise needs chronicling

Christianity was born without such a cult; it took rise and that rise needs chronicling. -The Christian Century. Jul 09, 2013 Charlie rated it it was amazing. Through this book our understanding of elements in Latin Christianity such as the logic behind being the patron to a dead man, and others ideas are more developed.

Following the fall of the Roman Empire in the West, the cult of the saints was the dominant form of religion in Christian Europe. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader.

We know that the cult of saints and its specific practices satisfied diverse . Brown’s book had two essential merits. Why did the former, when alive, function in a similar way to the latter, but cease to do so after death?

We know that the cult of saints and its specific practices satisfied diverse needs, and, for instance, common people, feast- ing on the saints’ laetitiae, did not necessarily follow the theological ideas of the bishops. Why did the former, when alive, function in a similar way to the latter, but cease to do so after death?

The term Christianized calendar refers to feast days which are Christianized reformulations of feasts from pre-Christian times. Historian Peter Brown, in his The Cult of the Saints: Its Rise and Function in Latin Christianity, argued that one cannot.

The term Christianized calendar refers to feast days which are Christianized reformulations of feasts from pre-Christian times. Historian Peter Brown, in his The Cult of the Saints: Its Rise and Function in Latin Christianity, argued that one cannot equate the ancient cults of pagan gods with the later cults of the saints.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Brown challenges the long-held two-tier idea of religion that separated the religious practices of the sophisticated elites from those of the superstitious masses, instead arguing that the cult of the saints crossed boundaries and played a dynamic part in both the Christian faith and the larger world of late antiquity.

Brown challenges the long-held "two-tier" idea of religion that separated the religious practices of the sophisticated elites from those of the superstitious masses, instead arguing that the cult of the saints crossed boundaries and played a dynamic part in both the Christian faith and the larger.

Brown challenges the long-held "two-tier" idea of religion that separated the religious practices of the sophisticated elites from those of the superstitious masses, instead arguing that the cult of the saints crossed boundaries and played a dynamic part in both the Christian faith and the larger world of late antiquity.

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Comments: (7)

Marilace
Everything that Peter Brown writes is worth reading. As always this short book is marked by his lucid prose. Brown treats this subject with a sympathy and understanding that is often missing in works touching on religious beliefs out of touch with contemporary western thought. He presents a very convincing exposition of why the cult of the saints was so prevalent and enduring in Late Antiquity and in the development of western Christendom.
Highly recommended.
Rocksmith
Brown's plunge into exploring the socio-cultural-spiritual conditions that not only engendered but gave burgeoning life to the cult of the Christian dead in Late Antiquity is a curiously succinct but often astonishing work. It remains, over 30 years since its publication, something of a benchmark for many scholars in terms of encapsulating this particular aspect of the nascent veneration of saints, and it's still easy to see why. With probative insights expressed in confident, often elegant prose, Brown overturned many of the long-held --and fundamentally flawed-- theses upon which general scholarly understanding of the origin of the cult of the saints had been predicated. Chief among these errant ideas was the notion that the so-called "worship" of the holy departed was directly borrowed from and/or patterned after the ancient Roman cults of gods and of deified heroes, in particular. Brown marshals lucid and nearly incontrovertible evidence demonstrating that veneration of the saints emerged instead from religious impulses and environments that were distinctly and uniquely Christian, and very much at odds with popular pagan practices and imperial theological predilections -- particularly in view of the symbiotic relationship that existed between the cultic celebration of an individual saint's hagiography and the organized reverence for their physical remains. Again, Brown is focused here upon the various factors that first occasioned and then nourished early saint-cults, so the reader will encounter no treatment of the much more complex and convoluted saga of the later medieval relic-trade. Look elsewhere for that fascinating story. Brown also does not assemble exhaustive historical details and examples that one might expect to find in a work that seeks to provide comprehensive scientific data for every theory proffered. Readers who desire meticulous information about which saints were venerated where by which churches and at what specific dates may be disappointed. This is not a documentary work --much less a proof-textual endeavor-- as much as it is a theoretical one. Brown seeks to enter the genuine spiritual and cultural mindsets of those who first felt compelled to gather sacred remains and bring "the living dead" from ostracized realms at the margins of Late Ancient society and make a prominent place for them in the increasingly flabbergasted pagan cities and towns, indeed at the very nexus of civilization. Though Brown's work in this matter might come across as too impressionistic and ponderous at times for the average lay reader, the book should not be too dense or arid for university-level researchers, and Brown's conclusions are powerful and compelling. They resonate even today for those interested in this fascinating and controversial element of Christian history and practice. For any serious student of Late Antiquity, this concise and penetrating little classic remains a "must."
Livina
Peter Brown is an outstanding example of a scholar who has deep knowledge of his subject and writes in a clear and accessible style. I am finding the new additions of Peter Brown's books (with updated bibliographic etc.) very useful.
Rivik
I read this on an on-line subscription library (ScribD), then decided to keep a copy in my own e-library for reference. The author provided a focus by having a hypothesis of his own, and this means neglect of some alternative explanations, but the historical account seems pretty complete. Also, supporting a hypothesis makes the data more interesting and easier to evaluate than an allegedly impartial story-telling.
Jode
Peter Brown's style is exquisite. He has imbibed the ethos of the late-antique nobility he writes about. There are (from our perspective) gains and losses as the invisible patrons (the saints) supplant visible ones. And while the loss of "horizontal" power in paganism is replaced with vertical authority, we ought to be broad-minded enough to see the gains as well as the losses there. Reconciliation between eternally warring strata of society is a real accomplishment, and is somewhat achieved through the cult of the saints. Not to be missed is Brown's description of demon-possession. Again, we carry our prejudices with us if we think that one labelled as possessed is thereby ostracized or oppressed. The very opposite is the case.
Amerikan_Volga
The Cult of the Saints is a scholarly look into how the saints, who were after all only human, came to occupy such exalted places in the minds of Catholics. The entire Christian world, it must be remembered, was nothing but Catholic for centuries. Peter Browns series of essays shows how, far from being a pagan holdover, the use of saints as mediators between earth and heaven became so popular and so accepted.

This is not a book to breeze through; rather, it requires careful, line by line reading. Recommended for readers who have the patience necessary to glean understanding from this scholarly material.
Zainian
This might be considered a a great primer for those who wish to introduce themselves to the world of historical theory as pertains to the classical world. While Mr. Brown does feel that it is better to approach this world before submersing oneself in the traditional mode of learning through Greek and Latin, he does manage to be a scamp in his unique approach to this field. Begone Gibbons.

Of course some may find that while his approach in unconventional, many of his theories have been advanced by Christian apologists throughout the past century. They have come to many of his conclusions be different.That said there is little to quibble about and the the notes alone are worth the price of the book.

The style of writing is at times pedestrian and may feel daunting to those readers who have not attuned their ear to the sounds of academia. SInce this book was written for the general, or thereabouts, public, it is a drawback. The reader must truly want to delve into this period. Let us be thankful that there are still scholars who find merit in studying the world of "dead white males" or females.
Any Peter Brown book is gripping, as I found this one. Anyone curious about the aspect and role of Saints in Christianity will enjoy this read.
Cult of the Saints (its rise and function in Latin Christianity) download epub
Catholicism
Author: P. Brown
ISBN: 0226076210
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Catholicism
Language: English
Publisher: SCM Press; First Edition edition (1981)
Pages: 187 pages