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Messianic Judaism: The First Study of Messianic Judaism by a Non-Adherent download epub

by Dan Cohn Sherbok


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In this pioneering study, Dan Cohn-Sherbok traces the development of the Messianic movement from ancient time . The book then goes on to consider the place of Messianic Judaism within the contemporary Jewish community.

In this pioneering study, Dan Cohn-Sherbok traces the development of the Messianic movement from ancient time to its transformation after World War II. Focusing on the nature of Messianic Judaism today, the volume continues with a detailed examination of Messianic practices, including the celebration of the Sabbath, Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot, festivals of joy, and life cycle events.

Messianic Judaism book. An almost shockingly objective perspective on Messianic Judaism by a Reform rabbi and scholar. Cohn-Sherbok concludes that Messianic Judaism (as well as secular and Buddhist Judaism) can be considered valid expressions of Judaism.

Voices of Messianic Judaism is a book of substantive articles compiled to focus discussion on some weighty matters facing the Messianic Jewish movement. Reform rabbi, Dr. Dan Cohn-Sherbok, himself not a Messianic Jew, is a friend of the movement. He believes that Messianic Judaism may be considered a branch of Judaism in the 21st century, especially if it wrestles with these Jewish issues. Professor of Judaism at the University of Wales, author of over 30 books, Rabbi Cohn-Sherbok guided the systematic selection of the thirteen topics addressed in this book

In this pioneering study, Dan Cohn-Sherbok traces the development of the Messianic movement from ancient times to its transformation after World War II. Focusing on the nature of the movement today, the volume continues with.

In this pioneering study, Dan Cohn-Sherbok traces the development of the Messianic movement from ancient times to its transformation after World War II. Focusing on the nature of the movement today, the volume continues with a detailed examination of Messianic practices, and the place of Messianic Judaism within the contemporary Jewish community. Who are the Messianic Jews? What do they believe and practice? What is the Jewish community's reaction to the development of Messianic Judaism?

Who are the Messianic Jews? What do they believe and practice? What is the Jewish community's reaction to Messianic .

Who are the Messianic Jews? What do they believe and practice? What is the Jewish community's reaction to Messianic Judaism? In this pioneering study, Dan Cohn-Sherbok traces the development of the Messianic movement from its origins in the early part of the Nineteenth Century and its transformation in the post World War years. Focusing on the nature of Messianic Judaism today, the volume continues with a detailed examination of Messianic practices including the celebration of the Sabbath, Passover, Shavuot, and Sukkot, festivals of joy, and life cycle events.

Messianic Judaism by Dan Cohn-Sherbok - 2001 - 248 pages. Seek Ye First the Kingdom of God by Nathaniel Max Rock - 2005 - 80 pages. Studies in the history of religion by Shlomo Pines - 1996 - 519 pages. Messianic Judaism is Not Christianity by Stan Telchin - 2004 - 176 pages. Messiasbelijdende joden, vroeger en nu by C. den Boer - 1989 - 232 pages. Mishpochah Matters by David Brickner - 1996 - 159 pages. My Sons are Jewish by Paula Clayman - 2011 - 192 pages. Supernatural Experiences by Sid Roth - 2012 - 195 pages. The Emergence of the Hebrew Christian Movement in Nineteenth-Century Britain by Michael R. Darby - 2010 - 285 pages. Who are the Messianic Jews? What do they believe and practice? What is the Jewish community's reaction to the development of Messianic Judaism?

Who are the Messianic Jews? What do they believe and practice? What is the Jewish community's reaction to this movement? This study traces the development of the movement from its origins in the early part of the 19th century and its transformation in the post-World War years. Focusing on the nature of Hebrew Christianity today, the volume continues with a sociological analysis of its adherents and theological exploration of its central tenets. It also pays attention to the tensions within Messianic Judaism and the central dilemmas it faces in the future.

Comments: (7)

Wnex
Overall a great look at all sides of this issue. The jumping back and forth of the dates in the beginning was a little hard to follow and left me wishing the editor had suggested a more chronological order. But the information was extremely thorough and well researched. The latter half of the book, dealing with beliefs and practices, as well as supporting and opposing ideas and movements, was terrific. Well done!
Ndyardin
This book is a very sensitively written and well informed one. I would go so far as to say that all religious Jews should read it in order to come to a truthful, just and hesedik (kind) relationship to Messianic Jews.
Gavinranara
This is a profoundly interesting book. There is no doubt the Jewish community detests Messianic Judaism and puts it about on a par with holocaust denial. Sadly, this is a knee-jerk reaction. Rabbi Cohn-Sherbok who is himself a Reform Jew and, from the evidence of his other books shares none of the beliefs of the Messianic community, has done an excellent job in presenting the history, beliefs and practices of the group objectively. It is an important piece of research and he has talked to critics of the movement as well as adherents. From his account, it is hard to imagine why any rational person would want to join the movement, but nonetheless it does appeart to be growing. If this is the case then it is important that the mainstream Jewish community voices its objections from the basis of secure knowledge. This book is an informed and fascinating piece of work and as such should be part of the library of every yeshiva, rabbinical college and synagogue. If the mainstream community were only secure enough to learn from fringe movements and make some attempt to understand their appeal to the more vulnerable members of our community, our synagogues might be fuller and our young people less turned off. Instead, the community prefers blanket condemnation and unreasoned abuse. No wonder the educated youth of today are disaffected. Rabbi Cohn-Sherbok is to be congratulated on his single-handed attempt to redress the balance; it is splendid to find someone in this day and age who takes Milton's defence of a free press seriously; as the great seventeenth century poet put it in his 'Areopagitica', 'Whoever knew Truth put to the worst in free and open discussion.' The Jewish community has nothing to fear from the Messianics; we simply need to be more confident in what we ourselves have to offer.
Anardred
Dan Cohn-Sherbok is a Reform rabbi, as well as Professor of Judaism at the University of Wales, and a prolific author/editor (e.g., Voices of Messianic Judaism: Confronting Critical Issues Facing a Maturing Movement). He wrote this book in 2000 because "I was convinced of the need for an objective account of this important development in modern Jewish life." (He mentions listening to a "Jews for Judaism" seminar "where we were lectured on the iniquities of the Messianic movement," whereby "Messianic Jews are evangelical Christians deceiving innocent Jewish people away from their ancestral heritage," versus a "Messianic rabbi" who "harangued his audience with quotations from Scripture...")

Cohn-Sherbok notes that "Despite the criticisms made by 'Jews for Judaism' and others, this new movement has captured the hearts and minds of thousands of pious individuals from the Jewish community, as well as Gentiles who have accepted Yeshua as their Lord and Saviour."

He begins with a survey of the "History and Beliefs of Messianic Judaism" (noting that "following the Six Day War, a major shift took place among Hebrew Christians. Increasingly, Jewish believers were anxious to form Messianic Jewish congregations where they worshipped Yeshua in a Jewish manner." But he then gives a detailed history of earlier movements (such as the "Hebrew Christian Alliance of America," the 19th and 20th century "missions to the Jews" movements, etc.) and the evolution of the movement "from Hebrew Christian Alliance to Messianic Judaism" in the 1960s. He provides a detailed survey of the practices and "Messianic Jewish observance" of MJs, including Sabbath, festivals, life cycle events, dietary laws, head coverings, etc.

The final section of the book is a thoughtful examination of the question of "The authenticity of Messianic Judaism," dealing not only with critics of the movement, but also with Israeli law (e.g., the Law of Return and the "Brother Daniel" case, and the Beresford case). The book concludes with a discussion of three "models of Messianic Judaism": Orthodox exclusivism, Non-Orthodox exclusivism, and the "Pluralist" model.

This book is by far the best and most objective overview of the Messianic movement I have found. For persons interested in such matters, it is "must reading."
Messianic Judaism: The First Study of Messianic Judaism by a Non-Adherent download epub
Christian Denominations & Sects
Author: Dan Cohn Sherbok
ISBN: 0304707309
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Christian Denominations & Sects
Language: English
Publisher: Continuum Intl Pub Group (September 2000)
Pages: 256 pages