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The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness download epub

by Kevin DeYoung,Adam Verner


Epub Book: 1309 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1532 kb.

DeYoung issues a stern warning to Christians who ignore the pursuit of holiness for whatever reason they may cite. He further seems to caution against the stream of the current "gospel centered" movement that says that if we truly understand the gospel, we will by extension grow in holiness represented by writers like Tullian Tchvidjian, Michael Horton, Paul Tripp (and I would say Martin Luther).

Kevin DeYoung covers these topics and more in his new book, The Hole In Our Holiness. Kevin does a great job of making that point clear. There is an excellent chapter on sexual immorality that seems random at first but very necessary in the end. Pastor DeYoung makes an important point when he states that we must confirm that holiness is possible.

Kevin DeYoung (PhD, University of Leicester) is the senior pastor at Christ . He is the author of several books, including Just Do Something; Crazy Busy; and Th. .

Kevin DeYoung (PhD, University of Leicester) is the senior pastor at Christ Covenant Church in Matthews, North Carolina, and assistant professor of systematic theology at Reformed Theological Seminary (Charlotte). He serves as board chairman of the Gospel Coalition and blogs at DeYoung, Restless, and Reformed. He is the author of several books, including Just Do Something; Crazy Busy; and The Biggest Story. Kevin and his wife, Trisha, have eight children.

If there is a hole in our holiness, Pastor DeYoung believes it's that . 160 pages, softcover from Crossway.

If there is a hole in our holiness, Pastor DeYoung believes it's that evangelicals don't look particularly holy! Looking to right the balance between grace and legalism, he presents an engaging exploration of sanctification and union with Christ. The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap Between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness (9781433541353) by Kevin DeYoung.

And we all have our reasons too: Maybe the pursuit of holiness seems legalistic So I make no claim to have scientifically proven that Christians are neglecting the pursuit of holiness

And we all have our reasons too: Maybe the pursuit of holiness seems legalistic. Maybe it feels like one more thing to worry about in your already overwhelming life. Maybe the emphasis on effort in the Christian life appears unspiritual. So I make no claim to have scientifically proven that Christians are neglecting the pursuit of holiness. But I’m not the first to think there is something missing in the contemporary church scene.

And we all have our reasons too: Maybe the pursuit of holiness seems legalistic. Books related to The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness.

DeYoung believes there is a hole in our holiness, a gap between gospel passion and the pursuit of holiness. The hole is simply this: that we don’t really care much about holiness. Passionate exhortation to pursue gospel-driven holiness is barely heard in most of our churches. While Ryle, Sproul and Bridges have written books that are almost timeless, DeYoung’s humor and references to culture keep it bound in the here and now. But this is exactly what makes it such a great complement to those other works. It does not replace them, but stands beside them.

Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the . The hole in our holiness is that we dont seem to care much about holiness.

The hole in our holiness is that we dont seem to care much about holiness. Or, at the very least, we dont understand it.

Kevin Deyoung The market is ready for DeYoung’s timely book, ready to avoid legalism an.

The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness. Looking to right the balances, Kevin DeYoung presents a popular-level treatment of sanctification and union with Christ, helping readers to see what matters most-being like Jesus. He shows how one can be like Christ in being joined to Christ. The market is ready for DeYoung’s timely book, ready to avoid legalism and ambivalence, and they are ready for someone to articulate the inextricable relationship between grace and holiness.

The "hole in our holiness" is that evangelicals don't look particularly holy, and, despite the flood of gospel-centered discussions, there seems to be a greater focus on personal depravity than on the pursuit of holiness. Looking to right the balances, Kevin DeYoung presents a popular-level treatment of sanctification and union with Christ, helping readers to see what matters most--being like Jesus. He shows how one can be like Christ in being joined to Christ. The market is ready for DeYoung's timely book, ready to avoid legalism and ambivalence, and they are ready for someone to articulate the inextricable relationship between grace and holiness.

Comments: (6)

Saithi
Great book on a subject that not a lot of people want to think about. Highly recommend it!
Visonima
J. I. Packer recently said in an interview with Desiring God,

There are writers who think that simply by crisp, orthodox formulations of Bible truth and wisdom--without any searching application to the reader--they are fulfilling the full role of a Christian writer and that nothing more is required of them.... There are enough people around already who can verbalize orthodoxy on paper. What we haven't got is writers who can join truth and wisdom about God from the Scriptures with personal communication; that is, communication that hits the heart, that makes you realize that this writer is a person talking to other persons and that this writer is trying to search me in order to help me and I must let him do it... There is a certain art and craft in writing in such a way that it gets to the reader's heart.

That quote kept coming back to me as I listened* to Kevin DeYoung's book The Hole in Our Holiness. This is a timely book targeting a large group of American Christians who, in their rush to embrace grace and avoid legalism, have swung the pendulum a bit too far. DeYoung is calling people in his own (YRR) movement to take the Bible seriously--not only in its invitations to revel in God's grace but in its commands to mimic God's holiness. In my view, DeYoung did an excellent job targeting my own heart and bringing his reader back to the scriptural "plumb."

DeYoung's thesis is simple: "A concern for holiness is not obvious in our lives like it is obvious in the pages of Scripture." If you don't think such a book is for you, if it sounds legalistic, then ask yourself DeYoung's three diagnostic questions:

1. Paul commends the Roman believers by saying "your obedience is known to all". Could that be said about us?
2. Is your heaven a holy place? Or is it a place of perpetual divine affirmation for us? Some Christians have never been taught that sorcerers, adulterers, and everyone who loves falsehood will be left outside the gates of heaven.
3. In our evangelism are we teaching people to do all that the Lord commanded?

For some Christians, DeYoung says, holiness is a lot like camping. It's great for those people who for some reason want to make life harder on themselves, but it's unclear why I should feel any obligation to try it. But you won't find such a view of holiness in the Bible, as DeYoung's book abundantly proves.

And his book is full of Bible, full of good theology applied searchingly to you and me. If DeYoung's exhortations sound more than a little fundamentalist, the problem doesn't lie with him. With some careful work through conservative doctrinal themes--union with Christ preeminent among them--DeYoung faithfully expounds the Bible's teaching on holiness.

But as Packer said, many people know these doctrines and can explain them accurately. What DeYoung adds is skilfull, heart-felt writing. He has many well-formed phrases that, for me, stuck.

* "When it comes to growth in godliness, trusting does not put an end to trying."
* "It's one thing to graduate from college ready to change the world; it's another thing to be resolute in praying that God would change you."
* "There is a gap between our love for the Gospel and our love for godliness. This must change. It's not pietism, legalism, or fundamentalism to take holiness seriously. it's the way of all those who have been called to a holy calling by a holy God."
* "To find acquittal from God at the last day, there must be evidence flowing out of us that grace has flowed into us."
* "Don't be so scared of works righteousness that you make pale what the Bible writes in bold colors. We are saved by grace through faith--Ephesians 2:8-9. We were created in Christ Jesus for good works--verse 10. Any gospel which purports to save people without changing them is inviting easy-believism."
* "[Sometimes biblical] imperatives hit us like a ton of study Bibles."

One of the most helpful things DeYoung did for me was to note that Jesus is a great physician who can writes different prescriptions for different maladies or different patients. Gratitude and duty are not the only appropriate motivations for holiness. Sometimes people are told to do right simply because it is right--for example, Ephesians 6:1. But compare Ephesians 4:32. "Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you." DeYoung put together a whole list of verses offering different motivations to do right. This was excessively valuable, because we all need as many inducements to holiness as we could possibly and righteously and biblically get.

THE SITUATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
One reviewer of DeYoung's book on The Gospel Coalition blog issued a mild criticism of it, saying that while some people may be too liberated by their (mis)understandings of grace, he still knows plenty of people who need to catch the gospel-centered wave. I could echo this criticism, but I wouldn't call it a criticism, only a suggestion to book-recommenders. This may not be the book to give to a legalist (try Milton Vincen'ts Gospel Primer for that), and that's okay. DeYoung witnessed a problem in his circles, one I've seen in my own heart, and he offered the Bible's answer to it. The question of legalism, though DeYoung does bring it up several times and though it is a significant problem, simply wasn't the situation DeYoung was addressing.

The holiness DeYoung is urging on his readers is one that makes worldly entertainment a serious issue. It's one that isn't flippant about dating standards (and here DeYoung gives a memorable personal illustration). And it's a holiness for which there are no performance-enhancing drugs. He argues that "the only way to extraordinary holiness is through ordinary means:" church, prayer, Bible reading, the ordinances.

His book is one of those means. It is an example of a Christian teacher exercising his gifts for the good of the whole body of Christ (Eph. 4:11ff.). And in the end it does not pit grace against holiness. Both the indicatives of scripture and its imperatives are from God for our good, given in grace, DeYoung says.

*I received this review book from christianaudio, but was not required to say anything positive. Because I listened to the book rather than reading it, direct quotations may vary slightly in punctuation from the printed book.
Yannara
The Hole in Our Holiness by Kevin DeYoung is a quality book on an old fashioned value that is largely overlooked in today's church. As a consequence he points out that holiness is lacking the church as the focus is on other areas such as grace.

He rightly asserts that grace does not mean no more law, it means that through Christ's perfect life we have fulfilled the law but Jesus still mentions several times that we are to keep His commandments. The chapter on sexual immorality is also a telling one in a world that sex is used to sell everything and sex outside of marriage is common place how do Christians keep themselves free from this moral pollution.

The last part of the book focuses on the difference between union with God and being in communion with God, which is the deeper level of intimacy that Christians should achieve. Also the importance of repentance is focused on as we are bound to mess up and need forgiveness from God or others we have hurt.

The narration was very good, it seemed to flow along at a nice pace and it was easy to understand.

This book is a wakeup call for Christians who have been drifting along with their personal holiness expecting the grace of God to cover all their wilful sinning. Also it is a great book Christians who really want a more intimate relationship with Jesus.

This audio book was gifted as a part of the christianaudio Reviewers Program in exchange for my unbiased review of this work. More information can be found about this and other Christian audio books at christianaudio.com.
Trex
I just finished the Christian Audio version of The Hole in our Holiness by Kevin DeYoung and read by Adam Verner. The full title of the book is The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness.

The Amazon.com Description:
The "hole in our holiness" is that evangelicals don't look particularly holy, and, despite the flood of gospel-centered discussions, there seems to be a greater focus on personal depravity than on the pursuit of holiness. Looking to right the balances, Kevin DeYoung presents a popular-level treatment of sanctification and union with Christ, helping readers to see what matters most--being like Jesus. He shows how one can be like Christ in being joined to Christ. The market is ready for DeYoung's timely book, ready to avoid legalism and ambivalence, and they are ready for someone to articulate the inextricable relationship between grace and holiness.
I absolutely agree with the basis of this book. In my own circles of friendships and acquaintances, I have seen this consistent slide towards a relaxed view of holiness. With many it has even been a, "We can continue in sin so grace may abound!" sort of view. Though most wouldn't admit this truth, their lives proclaim it day by day.

I have seen this tendency in my own life as well. The "big-bad" sins are gone, but those lingering ones tend to remain for a long time. It has been through great conviction, and some trials and tribulations, that God has begun to work those out of my life as well. It has now moved to the forefront of my mind that this is essential to all Christians. And the critical nature of personal holiness has also shown itself in my study of Ephesians at Edgewood.

The thing that I really enjoyed about this book, that moved it up to an "excellent" number of stars on my ratings, is that it is full (to the brim) with scripture. And not just references, I love it when an author includes whole verses and passages of scripture in their book. It isn't just "filler" for a book, it becomes the book's spinal cord.

I also appreciated how Kevin DeYoung starts by showing us the "why" of holiness, but he also tells us the "how" from more than one perspective. There were huge applicational points throughout the book, but he really zoned in on the marriage between God and his Grace in Jesus Christ and the effort that is exerted in a pursuit of holiness.

I highly recommend this book. I really enjoyed the voice talent as well. Adam Verner was a new name for me, but he really reminded me of the times that I have heard Kevin DeYoung speak. There was such a personal feel to the reading that I thought that it was actually the author reading the book through most of it.
The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness download epub
Christian Living
Author: Kevin DeYoung,Adam Verner
ISBN: 1610454715
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Christian Living
Language: English
Publisher: christianaudio; Unabridged edition (August 31, 2012)