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I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage download epub

by Mary-Ann Kirkby


Epub Book: 1837 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1438 kb.

Mary-Ann Kirkby is a gifted storyteller. I am with her in Kindergarten, which she started, as all other Hutterite children at age two and a half, when they began their religious training.

Mary-Ann Kirkby is a gifted storyteller. She describes the soft, fresh buns after dipping them into "Schmond Wacken" (cream) with generous dollops of jam that she enjoyed for breakfast, and the stories, songs and games she participated in. I am with her when she and the other children went on outings to see the geese or visit the colony gardens.

I Am Hutterite chronicles her quest to reinvent herself as she comes to terms with the painful circumstances . I first met Mary-Ann Kirkby in 1999 when she spoke at a women’s conference that I helped to organize called Women Connecting Women.

I Am Hutterite chronicles her quest to reinvent herself as she comes to terms with the painful circumstances that led her family to leave community life. Rich with memorable characters and vivid descriptions, this ground-breaking narrative shines a light on intolerance, illuminating the simple truth that beneath every human exterior beats a heart longing for understanding and acceptance.

Kirkby describes her journey from burying her past to fit in as a child with her peers to finding acceptance of her heritage as an adult while writing this book. Interlaced throughout are descriptions of Hutterite cuisine and fashion, and explanations of religious practices and politics within these groups. Originally published: Nashville, Tenn. Thomas Nelson, c2010. Includes bibliographical references. obscured text on back cover. 2. I love the first 198 pages of this book, but then Kirkby "summarizes" the rest of her story and wraps up loose ends much too quickly.

I Am Hutterite is the fasinating, true story of a young woman's journey to. .Winner of the 2007 Saskatchewan Book Award for Non-fiction.

I Am Hutterite is the fasinating, true story of a young woman's journey to reclaim her heritage. In 1969, Ann-Marie's parents left the Hutterite community in southern Manitoba with their seven children. Overnight Ann-Marie entered a world she didn't understand where mac & cheese, bicycles, rock-n-roll, and Walt Disney were commonplace. Your mother and father are running away," said a voice piercing the warm air.

Mary-Ann Kirkby spent her childhood in a Hutterite colony in Canada. Without warning her parents uprooted their 7 children to begin a new life in the outside world. Mary-Ann's difficult transition into popular culture led her to an award-winning career in television as a gifted storyteller. Библиографические данные. I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage.

Books about Hutterite Life ~ Sarah's Country Kitchen ~ I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of.

Books about Hutterite Life ~ Sarah's Country Kitchen ~ I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of One Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage. tw: We have hutterites in mt. Fantastic, spell-binding book that looks inside a colony from an insider. This is the shocking true story of an innocent girl abused by the very people who said they would take good care of her. Lily's family began the path to her destruction, they used and abused her, but they never ever wanted or loved her. The site for Free & Bargain Kindle Books.

I Am Hutterite chronicles her quest to reinvent herself as she comes to terms with the . Books related to I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage.

Mary-Ann Kirkby (born 1959) is a Canadian author who has written two .

Mary-Ann Kirkby (born 1959) is a Canadian author who has written two memoirs about her upbringing in the Hutterite tradition. Kirkby was born on a Hutterite colony in Manitoba to Ronald and Mary Dornn.

In 1969, Ann-Marie’s parents did the unthinkable. They left a Hutterite colony inCanada with seven children, and little else, to start a new life. Overnight, the familywas thrust into a society they did not understand and which knew little of theirunique culture. The transition was overwhelming.Desperate to be accepted, ten-year-old Ann-Marie was forced to deny her heritagein order to fit in with her peers.

Winner of the 2007 Saskatchewan Book Award for Non-fiction.

“Your mother and father are running away,"said a voice piercing the warm air.I froze and turned toward home.To a Hutterite, nothing is more shamefulthan that word, running away, Weglaufen...”

In 1969, Ann-Marie’s parents did the unthinkable. They left a Hutterite colony inCanada with seven children, and little else, to start a new life. Overnight, the familywas thrust into a society they did not understand and which knew little of theirunique culture. The transition was overwhelming.Desperate to be accepted, ten-year-old Ann-Marie was forced to deny her heritagein order to fit in with her peers. I Am Hutterite chronicles her quest to reinventherself as she comes to terms with the painful circumstances that led her family toleave community life.Rich with memorable characters and vivid descriptions, this ground-breaking narrativeshines a light on intolerance, illuminating the simple truth that beneath everyhuman exterior beats a heart longing for understanding and acceptance.


Comments: (7)

The Sinners from Mitar
I was interested in this book as I have worked around and with Amish and Mennonite people for several years, but Hutterites are not common in America (at least in my area). Hutterites differ from the Amish in several ways. #1, personal property is eschewed: no one owns a car, a tv, etc...although like the Amish, this is often done under wraps. I think the Hutterite seem more joyful in their everyday life than the Amish. But the Hutterites lead a much more communal life than the Amish. All food and animal production is for the community. What is NOT different from the Amish is that one or two MEN hold ABSOLUTE POWER over the rest. Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely, and the Hutterite community is not immune from this.

This book is about Mary Ann Kirkby's childhood. Unlike many of these types of story, it was not all moonbeams and lollipops. It was a hard life, and she described it in such a way that made me become attached to many of the people in the story. I want to thank Mary Ann for writing this book. It was well written and insightful, and I had a hard time putting it down. Do yourself a favor and read this book.
DrayLOVE
A Hutterite Story

It was several years after I left the Amish that I first heard about Hutterites through a magazine article. At the time I was astonished that there could be a third branch of Anabaptists that I had never heard about during my 23 years of living in an Amish community. (The other two are Amish and Mennonites). Since then I have read more articles about Hutterites, but I was always left wanting for more information, which left an air of mystery and intrigue around them -- I imagine much the same way most people feel about the Amish. (Except maybe even more so, for unlike the Amish, the Hutterites live on cloistered colonies, which does not include anyone who is not Hutterite.) After learning about this culture, I wished I knew someone who grew up on a Hutterite colony, or at least that I'd have the opportunity to read a story by a Hutterite.

I found just such a story when I recently read "I Am Hutterite" by Mary-Ann Kirkby. In this beautifully rendered story, she serves her readers a slice of life on the colony from her perspective of a young child after her mother had given birth to a younger sibling:

"As soon as she arrived home from the hospital, Mother entered "die Wuchen," a six-week period of special treatment extended to women after the birth of each child. This included a nine-week exemption from colony duty. Peterana was the cook for nursing mothers, and she delivered delicacies to our house every day. Rich foods like "Nukkela Suppen" (buttery dumplings), waffles soaked in whiskey, and plump cuts of chicken were carried over from the community kitchen in bowls and stainless-steel pails. While the rest of the colony ate regular fare at the long tables in the community kitchen, Mother had the privilege of inviting family and friends to dine with her at home. Most often, her guest of choice was my father."

Mary-Ann Kirkby is a gifted storyteller. I am with her in Kindergarten, which she started, as all other Hutterite children at age two and a half, when they began their religious training. She describes the soft, fresh buns after dipping them into "Schmond Wacken" (cream) with generous dollops of jam that she enjoyed for breakfast, and the stories, songs and games she participated in. I am with her when she and the other children went on outings to see the geese or visit the colony gardens. I feel as though her memories and mine meld when she describes opening the pods in the pea patch and pulling baby carrots from the ground.

Kirkby's childhood was as nearly idyllic as a child's can be. I love the way she sets the background for the day her life was to change forever when she was ten years old:

"Across the western sky, the rich red, orange, and gold tones of a spectacular Manitoba sunset were bringing the soft summer day to a close. We felt spoiled by its beauty in Fairholme, for over and over again, even in the harshest of winters, we were treated to its splendor. Against this magic expanse of space, I was playing dodgeball with the children from the Essenschul. We all had the giggles, and our laughter infected a group of adults who had come to watch... I, as wide as was tall, kept eluding the ball....

"Above the merriment, a voice pierced the warm air..."

I won't spoil the story, but I will say that life on the colony was less than idyllic for Mary-Ann's father. And here is where I actually identify with Mary-Ann's parents for the tough choice they had to make, even though I know that life for Mary-Ann and her siblings was about to change... and not necessarily for the better.

I Am Hutterite is a wonderfully sensual story about Hutterite life, which did exactly what I thought such a story would... it brings Hutterites down to earth and puts a human face on them.

The same way that Kirkby's childhood story is nearly idyllic, so is this book nearly perfect. But I have three criticisms.

1. There is a subtitle on this book, "The fascinating true story of a young woman's journey to reclaim her heritage." There was only a very small portion of Kirkby's story that pertained to this, so I feel like this subtitle is not very accurate. And to that end, I wonder if Kirkby isn't trying to have it both ways... claim she is Hutterite, while still enjoying the personal freedom she would have to sacrifice if she were to actually rejoin life on the colony. Perhaps it comes of those good memories of her Hutterite childhood.

2. I love the first 198 pages of this book, but then Kirkby "summarizes" the rest of her story and wraps up loose ends much too quickly. I would have preferred that she save this part of her story for a sequel, so that she could tell the story in the same sensual details with which she had told her story thus far.

3. I read somewhere on Kirkby's website that she learned the art of telling stories from life on the colony. I felt I missed something, because I would have loved to have "been there" during a story-telling session.

Perhaps Kirkby did learn how to fashion a good story from her people, but I cannot believe that all her talent comes from observing the masters -- I am willing to bet that she was born with her gift for storytelling that was then nurtured in her original community. Either way, I am glad she used her talent to bring us the story, "I Am Hutterite." It carries an important message about a little-known culture in North America.

Note: The spell checker recognizes "Amish" or "Mennonite," but it doesn't recognize "Hutterite." I know there is much intrigue about foreign "exotic" cultures, but I find it interesting that we in North America don't know the Hutterites well enough to have the name of their culture show up as a valid word in our lexicon.
Alsalar
I didn't know much about Hutterites before this book. Their simple life is build on community and German traditions. Unlike Amish and Mennonite communities, property is held in common, making Hutterite colonies one of the few successful attempts at pure communism (not to be confused with "Communism" practiced in Russia or China, etc).

The author had a very secure and comfortable childhood within the colony. I'm not convinced it was so easy for her parents. At age ten, her parents were compelled to leave the colony, a serious step away from family, with little to start over. The Kirkby family's entrance into the world of the "English" was difficult, though they eventually assimilated.

Spoilers:

Her story, written to share her Hutterite background with her son, recounts her rosy memories of childhood. True, for children life often seems simple and marvelous. Also true, the Hutterites are a society that values community harmony and is not terribly expressive with emotions. Yet in this close-knit colony not all is a bed of roses. Mary Ann's uncle Jake (mother's brother) never accepts her father and since Jake is the colony's leader, this creates serious problems. The author's father is the only colony member to stand up to Jake, arguing for what he considers fair play and the Hutterite ideals. Jake seems devious is finding ways to get even, denying them use of the colony's only car to rush their children to the hospital and eventually costing the family the life of one of their children. Jake is the only person the author singles out as creating problems within the colony. Is this the memory of a child whose parents can only speak humbly and graciously about others? Long after the family has left the colony, as Jake is dying of cancer, the sister and brother-in-law both try to make peace with Jake, only to rebuffed. After Jake dies, it is discovered just how devious he was, not only with the Kirkby's family, but with the entire colony.

While this book is full of interesting background on the Hutterites,I ended up giving it three stars because I felt the book was like a thin watercolor. The writing style is simple and unpolished, though it is easy reading. Mary Ann never probed her parents about emotions and painful memories. We are giving examples of when things are hard but these stories are always balanced with hardy resilience. There was little looking back at colony life except from a young child's viewpoint.

I would have been especially interested in her mother's story. What makes her mother turn from the Hutterite religion to a Bible-thumping, revival-tent conversion? How did she feel about her role within the colony? How did she emotionally survive the move outside the colony? I would have been interested in why so many other colony members left, especially the young people.

The close knit community has many strengths that we miss in our isolated lifestyle. If you ever yearn for a peaceful lifestyle, this book will make you wish you could have grown up Hutterite. Yet with the closeness of community there is also restriction. I feel the author is glossing over the flaws to give her son a positive image of his family background. That's fine. It still is an interesting book. It just becomes a short look into Hutterite culture, not a piercing evaluation.
I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage download epub
Christian Living
Author: Mary-Ann Kirkby
ISBN: 0849946433
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Christian Living
Language: English
Publisher: Thomas Nelson; Updated edition (May 9, 2011)
Pages: 272 pages