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All's Well That Ends Well (The Pelican Shakespeare) download epub

by Claire McEachern,William Shakespeare


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There is a consistent theme regarding men and women in Shakespeare's comedies and "All's Well That Ends Well" is no exception

Each book includes an essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare’s time. There is a consistent theme regarding men and women in Shakespeare's comedies and "All's Well That Ends Well" is no exception. Shakespeare adored women, and praised the marriage covenant as the very cement holding civilization together. He portrayed a good marriage as not merely romantic but as heroic.

All's Well That Ends Well is a play by William Shakespeare, published in the First Folio in 1623, where it is listed among the comedies. There is a debate regarding the dating of the composition of the play, with possible dates ranging from 1598 to 1608. The play is considered one of Shakespeare’s "problem plays"; a play that poses complex ethical dilemmas that require more than typically simple solutions. Bertram, Count of Roussillon.

In her they are the better for their simpleness; she derives her honesty, and achieves her goodness. The remembrance of her father never approaches her heart but the tyranny of her sorrows takes all livelihood from her cheek. Your commendations, madam, get from her tears. Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise in. No more of this, Helena; go to, no more, lest it be rather thought you affect a sorrow than to haveHELENA. I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too.

In the early plays, Shakespeare frequently seems to be showing off through bold displays of his verbal dexterity. All's Well, on the other hand, has a more mature, subtle, and complicated feeling to it. The imagery is more delicate and nuanced. To put it simply, the play sounds so different from the early comedies, and feels much more connected in tone to the great tragedies and problem plays that Shakespeare wrote in the middle and later.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines

Part of The Pelican Shakespeare. Part of The Pelican Shakespeare. Category: Literary Criticism. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. About All’s Well That Ends Well.

A complete summary of William Shakespeare's Play, All's Well That Ends Well Judi Dench in All's Well That Ends Well, RSC, 2003

A complete summary of William Shakespeare's Play, All's Well That Ends Well. Find out more about the lengths a scorned bride will go to win the love of her husband. Judi Dench in All's Well That Ends Well, RSC, 2003. Act II. The Countess allows Helen to go to court and try her hand at curing the King's illness.

A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book. 1. Hamlet by. William Shakespeare. score: 55,963, and 566 people voted.

There is no evidence that All's Well was popular in Shakespeare's own lifetime and it has remained one of his lesser-known plays .

There is no evidence that All's Well was popular in Shakespeare's own lifetime and it has remained one of his lesser-known plays ever since, in part due to its odd mixture of fairy tale logic, gender role reversals and cynical realism. Though originally the play was classified as one of Shakespeare's comedies, the play is now considered by some critics to be one of his problem plays, so named because they cannot be neatly classified as tragedy or comedy.

The first page of All's Well that Ends Well from the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, published in 1623. All's Well That Ends Well is a play by William Shakespeare. It is believed to have been written between 1604 and 1605, and was originally published in the First Folio in 1623. He tries to marry a local lord’s daughter, but Diana shows up and breaks up the engagement. Helena appears and explains the ring swap, announcing that she has fulfilled Bertram’s challenge; Bertram, impressed by all she has done to win him, swears his love to her. Thus all ends well. There is a subplot about Parolles, a disloyal associate of Bertram’s.

The acclaimed Pelican Shakespeare series edited by A. R. Braunmuller and Stephen Orgel   The legendary Pelican Shakespeare series features authoritative and meticulously researched texts paired with scholarship by renowned Shakespeareans. Each book includes an essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare’s time, an introduction to the individual play, and a detailed note on the text used. Updated by general editors Stephen Orgel and A. R. Braunmuller, these easy-to-read editions incorporate over thirty years of Shakespeare scholarship undertaken since the original series, edited by Alfred Harbage, appeared between 1956 and 1967. With definitive texts and illuminating essays, the Pelican Shakespeare will remain a valued resource for students, teachers, and theater professionals for many years to come.   For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.  

Comments: (5)

Nirad
"All's Well That Ends Well" is one of Shakespeare's "problem comedies" because the conventional workings of comedy are stretched to the breaking point. We wonder what Helena sees in snobbish, ungracious and stiff-necked Bertram. Helena is pure-hearted, resourceful, and not easily defeated. Bertram is high-born and a louse. He disdains her obvious virtue and beauty, and finds her ludicrous as a prospective mate, due to her lowly birth as a poor physician's daughter. So, what is it that Helena sees in him? Shakespeare never gives us a satisfactory answer, and we are left with what amounts to a cliche: love is blind.

"All's Well that Ends Well" may have originally been titled "Love's Labor's Won," a play thought to have been lost, and a companion play to "Love's Labor's Lost," written around 1590-92. Some critics think so, and point to a line in the play as evidence, uttered by Helena: "This is done; Will you be mine, now you are doubly won?"

There is a consistent theme regarding men and women in Shakespeare's comedies and "All's Well That Ends Well" is no exception. Shakespeare adored women, and praised the marriage covenant as the very cement holding civilization together. He portrayed a good marriage as not merely romantic but as heroic. He created a series of female characters who were both passionate and pure, who gave their hearts spontaneously and remained true to the bargain in the face of tremendous odds. Men, on the other hand, are not nearly so good or so pure and require chastening before they are allowed to get the girl. Indeed, men are fickle and quick to shy away from commitment. They do not recognize true love when it stares them in the face. These are the very qualities that describe Helena and Bertram.

Helena overcomes great odds and in the end gets her man, but we are left wondering if Bertram has been sufficiently chastened as the play suggests, and will honor his marriage vows. And we can't help wondering: was he worth the effort?

"All's Well that Ends Well" is filled with marvelous characters. Bertram's mother, the Countess of Rousillon, is one of Shakespeare's great dames. And Parolles, Bertram's friend, is one of Shakespeare's great rats. And Helena is of course one of Shakespeare's great heroines, even if she has questionable taste in men. Finally, The Pelican Shakespeare Edition is highly worthwhile, because of the brilliant introduction by UCLA professor (and Shakespeare scholar) Claire McEachern. Five stars.
Varshav
This kindle version is not formatted properly. Makes it difficult to read when there are line numbers in the middle of words. I tried changing my reading style (columns, size font), but nothing helped.
Runeshaper
This is a bitter play with a happy ending. It's full of people deceiving and cheating each other but the title is fulfilled and all ends well. Or does it?

Is the happiness at the end of the play deserved? Do two wrongs make a right? The well-known proverb says they do not, so we would expect Shakespeare to agree but he doesn't. The hero and heroine, Bertram and Helena, wrong each other but in the end they get what they want, especially Helena, so two wrongs do seem to make a right. And yet, something feels off. The memory of deceit and trickery remains with the protagonists, so perhaps things don't end that well after all.

Helena is a sincere, loving, deserving woman. Her late father was the physician to the House of Rossillion. She is in love with Bertram, the young count, but as mere servant she cannot aspire to marry into nobility. She does have an ally however in the old Countess Rossillion and Bertram's mother. The countess thinks Helena's qualities outshine her low status and is happy at the thought of Helena as her daughter-in-law. But how to match the two?

Helena's father left her a secret cure with which she heals the dying King. As a reward, she asks that he gives her the husband of her choice. The King agrees and she chooses Bertram. Bertram is aghast and accepts only after the King threatens him. He cheats Helena however as he resolves to go abroad without ever consummating the marriage.

He makes his way to Florence and enters the service of the Duke. Much to everyone's surprise, not least the audience's, Bertram reveals himself a valiant warrior. He falls in love with a local woman, Diana, but knowing he is married she refuses his advances.

In the meantime, Helena follows Bertram to Italy in secret and meets Diana. She urges Diana to demand a token from Bertram, his ancestral ring, which he foolishly gives her as a love token. Diana tells Bertram to meet her in her bedroom, but Helena takes her place. In the dark, Bertram can't tell the difference and he makes love with Helena.

In the end all is resolved. Helena pretends to be dead only to be resurrected, revealing a ruse by which Bertram is threatened with execution. The King, as confused as we are, finally comes to understand everything when Bertram's old friend and reformed braggart Parolles gives a crucial testimony.

But what exactly happened here?

First, Helena forces herself upon a man who wants nothing to do with her. Is this right? Shakespeare has to present Helena has an exceptionally intelligent and sympathetic woman or else everyone naturally would take Bertram's side. We still feel Bertram shouldn't be forced. But why do we feel this? After all, no Shakespeare audience would feel anything was wrong in forcing an unwanted husband on a woman. Think of Kate in The Taming of the Shrew. Why does the reverse make us feel it's wrong?

Second, Bertram initially turns down Helena merely because she is of low status. Even in Shakespeare's day some regard was given to merit and ability. Bertram's refusal seems petty. Why would Helena want him after that?

Third, both Bertram and Helena lack empathy for the other; they resort to lies and tricks to get to their ends. We say all's fair in love and war, but how can we claim to love someone on whom we so readily play tricks?

A contrite Bertram marries a triumphant Helena, but Helena is wise enough to understand that her future is built upon a shaky foundation. When Bertram tells her he will love her dearly, she warns him that if "it prove untrue, deadly divorce step between me and you." (Act V, scene 3 lines 314-315)

In other words, we have a very grey play. We have good people doing bad things; Bertram and Helena trick each other, while the King and the countess take no heed of Bertram's feelings, and a host of minor characters participate in the various charades. We have bad things leading to good results; Bertram is forgiven and he and Helena marry. But the good ending is corrupted. Helena and Bertram will always live under the shadow of deceipt.

All's not so well after all...

Vincent Poirier, Montreal
All's Well That Ends Well (The Pelican Shakespeare) download epub
Literature & Fiction
Author: Claire McEachern,William Shakespeare
ISBN: 014071460X
Category: Christian Books & Bibles
Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Classics; 1st edition (August 1, 2001)
Pages: 113 pages